The Michelangelo Foundation Presents
The Michelangelo Foundation Presents
Exhibition spaces Exhibitors Objects
Best of Europe

Best of Europe
Go on a journey through contemporary European craftsmanship and discover wonderful objects created by artist-artisans. Wander through a selection of over 300 objects including Spanish leatherwork, Italian ceramics, French porcelain, Irish basketmaking and German glassware.

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Switzerland  Müstair 6 Brass Metal vessel This handmade brass bowl with a number of bold, quasi-triangular geometric faces has been finished with a brass patina. Barbara Amstutz takes her inspiration from the vaulted ceilings of the Benedictine Convent of St John at Müstair, in the Swiss canton of Graubünden.
Barbara Amstutz
Silversmith
Brass bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

To Barbara Amstutz, accompanying an idea from its conception and first design sketch to the finished metal creation is a source of endless fascination and pleasure. As well as creating artistic metalwork and metalwork for liturgical purposes, Barbara restores antique silver and non-precious metal items. She sees antique pieces as a testimony of past everyday lives, their shapes, stamps, materials, marks and dents telling stories of their past creators, owners and passage through time. Silversmiths were an integral part of European life until the end of the 18th century, as much politically as economically. Barbara draws and transfers her inspiration from this historic craft to the creation of her contemporary silverworks.

Atelier

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Maison

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Biography

Barbara Amstutz

From her workshop in Basel, Switzerland, Barbara Amstutz creates silver objects for everyday use and liturgical purposes as well as works of art. These works are created in limited series or as one-off pieces. Barbara uses her knowledge of traditional silversmith techniques to produce innovative contemporary objects and takes great pleasure in pursuing ideas and carrying out elaborate designs. The unlimited malleability of silver as well as the wide variety of options for working with this precious metal fascinate her. As well as creating her own works, Barbara restores, repairs and conserves antique silver and other metal objects.

Switzerland  Müstair 6 Copper Metal vessel Inspired by the vaulted ceilings of the Benedictine Convent of St John at Müstair, in the Swiss canton of Graubünden, the flat geometric faces of this copper bowl reflect Barbara Amstutz’s juxtaposed vision of the ceiling and bowls as vessels of religious activities. This bowl has been finished with a copper patina, which gives it a matte colour.
Barbara Amstutz
Silversmith
Copper bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

To Barbara Amstutz, accompanying an idea from its conception and first design sketch to the finished metal creation is a source of endless fascination and pleasure. As well as creating artistic metalwork and metalwork for liturgical purposes, Barbara restores antique silver and non-precious metal items. She sees antique pieces as a testimony of past everyday lives, their shapes, stamps, materials, marks and dents telling stories of their past creators, owners and passage through time. Silversmiths were an integral part of European life until the end of the 18th century, as much politically as economically. Barbara draws and transfers her inspiration from this historic craft to the creation of her contemporary silverworks.

Atelier

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Maison

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Biography

Barbara Amstutz

From her workshop in Basel, Switzerland, Barbara Amstutz creates silver objects for everyday use and liturgical purposes as well as works of art. These works are created in limited series or as one-off pieces. Barbara uses her knowledge of traditional silversmith techniques to produce innovative contemporary objects and takes great pleasure in pursuing ideas and carrying out elaborate designs. The unlimited malleability of silver as well as the wide variety of options for working with this precious metal fascinate her. As well as creating her own works, Barbara restores, repairs and conserves antique silver and other metal objects.

Switzerland  Müstair 9 Metal vessel This handmade bowl has been made with 925 sterling silver. The vaulted ceilings of the Benedictine Convent of St John at Müstair, in the Swiss canton of Graubünden, are the origin of Barbara Amstutz's inspiration. She sees these painted ceilings as bowls, or vessels of religious activity.
Barbara Amstutz
Silversmith
Silver bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

To Barbara Amstutz, accompanying an idea from its conception and first design sketch to the finished metal creation is a source of endless fascination and pleasure. As well as creating artistic metalwork and metalwork for liturgical purposes, Barbara restores antique silver and non-precious metal items. She sees antique pieces as a testimony of past everyday lives, their shapes, stamps, materials, marks and dents telling stories of their past creators, owners and passage through time. Silversmiths were an integral part of European life until the end of the 18th century, as much politically as economically. Barbara draws and transfers her inspiration from this historic craft to the creation of her contemporary silverworks.

Atelier

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Maison

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Biography

Barbara Amstutz

From her workshop in Basel, Switzerland, Barbara Amstutz creates silver objects for everyday use and liturgical purposes as well as works of art. These works are created in limited series or as one-off pieces. Barbara uses her knowledge of traditional silversmith techniques to produce innovative contemporary objects and takes great pleasure in pursuing ideas and carrying out elaborate designs. The unlimited malleability of silver as well as the wide variety of options for working with this precious metal fascinate her. As well as creating her own works, Barbara restores, repairs and conserves antique silver and other metal objects.

Switzerland  Müstair 12 Metal vessel This handmade bowl has been made with 925 sterling silver. The vaulted ceilings of the Benedictine Convent of St John at Müstair, in the Swiss canton of Graubünden, are the origin of Barbara Amstutz’s inspiration. She sees these painted ceilings as bowls, or vessels of religious activity.
Barbara Amstutz
Silversmith
Silver Bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

To Barbara Amstutz, accompanying an idea from its conception and first design sketch to the finished metal creation is a source of endless fascination and pleasure. As well as creating artistic metalwork and metalwork for liturgical purposes, Barbara restores antique silver and non-precious metal items. She sees antique pieces as a testimony of past everyday lives, their shapes, stamps, materials, marks and dents telling stories of their past creators, owners and passage through time. Silversmiths were an integral part of European life until the end of the 18th century, as much politically as economically. Barbara draws and transfers her inspiration from this historic craft to the creation of her contemporary silverworks.

Atelier

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Maison

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Contact

Barbara Amstutz

Hohestrasse 134 4104 Oberwil
+41 61 301 18 62
info@barbaraamstutz.ch
www.barbaraamstutz.ch

Métier

Barbara Amstutz’s most important tools are hammers, irons and anvils of various shapes and sizes, plus fire for annealing and soldering silver. Using ancient techniques, she forges, drives and assembles metal.

Biography

Barbara Amstutz

From her workshop in Basel, Switzerland, Barbara Amstutz creates silver objects for everyday use and liturgical purposes as well as works of art. These works are created in limited series or as one-off pieces. Barbara uses her knowledge of traditional silversmith techniques to produce innovative contemporary objects and takes great pleasure in pursuing ideas and carrying out elaborate designs. The unlimited malleability of silver as well as the wide variety of options for working with this precious metal fascinate her. As well as creating her own works, Barbara restores, repairs and conserves antique silver and other metal objects.

Ireland  Grass Bowls Metal vessel These four silver bowls have each been finished with a different shade of vitreous enamel. Each bowl is glazed in a gradually darker colour, from yellow to green, representing different shades of grass.
Cara Murphy
Silversmith
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Challenging the established boundaries of functional silverware and silver-smithing techniques, Cara Murphy’s works address the concept of a silver landscape. Her works have a sculptural presence and interact with the table they are placed on, metaphorically “growing” from it. Through her sculptural silver forms, Cara aims to challenge our traditional view of this medium by not only creating functional works but also by creating works with which the viewer can interact. Working with a variety of materials, Cara investigates organic forms. Within the context of the dining table, her work aims to create a focus for the table that interacts with objects. The viewer therefore interacts with the piece and the piece with the viewer.

Atelier

Métier

Basse taille involves layers of vitreous enamel being applied wet onto the silver with a quill and fired in a kiln.

Maison

Contact

Cara Murphy

Blessington House, 18 Ballynahinch Street, BT26 6AW Hillsborough
+ 44 7811 958807
cara@caramurphy.com
www.caramurphy.com

Contact

Cara Murphy

Blessington House, 18 Ballynahinch Street, BT26 6AW Hillsborough
+ 44 7811 958807
cara@caramurphy.com
www.caramurphy.com

Métier

Basse taille involves layers of vitreous enamel being applied wet onto the silver with a quill and fired in a kiln.

Biography

Cara Murphy

Cara Murphy is a contemporary silversmith based in Northern Ireland. Trained at the Glasgow School of Art and the Royal College of Art, London, she applies traditional silversmith techniques to create innovative, functional and sculptural silver tableware. Cara takes her inspiration from the natural environment, creating silver landscapes for the dining table that metaphorically 'grow' from it. Her award-winning silverware has been exhibited in numerous applied art and silversmithing exhibitions, and her work is represented in many international collections.

Germany  Tree of Life Wood sculpture This sculpture has been turned from green (wet) oak. The wood grain is deliberately oriented so as to influence the final form of the object during the drying process. Fissures and cracks, produced through the natural deformation of the wood, are held together with wooden butterfly keys. The surface is treated with clay.
Ernst Gamperl
Wood turning
Turned Wood Métier Story Atelier
Story

After years of experimenting with different types of woods, Ernst Gamperl turned to exclusively turning “wet wood”, freshly cut wood that has not been dried. While his early works display highly precise craftsmanship, his later works have gone down an increasingly minimalistic path, bringing out old forms and surfaces that reveal the beauty of the wood. Ernst’s works do not simply start on the lathe, they are the result of more than twenty years of experimentation, toiling and studying wood, its drying properties and this impact on the final sculpture. He knows that this is a mutual dialogue and he cannot force a shape onto the material. This insight is a challenge that drives him further through this medium and work.

Atelier

Métier

A lathe quickly rotates a piece of wood. The form and texture is cut by hand with special turning tools, partly manufactured by the artist himself.

Maison

Contact

Ulrike Spengler

+49 8862 93 28 800
info@ernst-gamperl.de
www.ernst-gamperl.de

Contact

Ulrike Spengler

+49 8862 93 28 800
info@ernst-gamperl.de
www.ernst-gamperl.de

Métier

A lathe quickly rotates a piece of wood. The form and texture is cut by hand with special turning tools, partly manufactured by the artist himself.

Biography

Ernst Gamperl

Originally trained as a cabinetmaker, Munich born Ernst Gamperl stumbled on woodturning by chance. Equipped with a book on woodturning he starting training in this craft as an autodidact, unhampered by convention in his approach to turnery. After a few years, by means of patience, exercise and research, he perfected this technique and established his first workshop in 1990. Although Ernst used to prefer working with precious, exotic woods, he has since come to focus on working with European wood varieties like maple, beech, Italian olive tree and principally oak. After three years, he entered the design school in Hildesheim, Germany, and was awarded the title "Meister"(Master). Ernst exhibits his work extensively throughout Europe and internationally. His objects have earned him numerous prizes and are found in museum and private collections worldwide.

Netherlands  Wave – Purpur egg Glass Sculpture These egg-shaped blown glass sculptures stand on glass. Geir Nustad's exploration of colour, patterns and textures could trick the viewer into thinking these works are made from turned wood. The strong contrast between the brown exterior and purple interior of the sculpture, the dark and the colourful, challenges what is possible when working with glass, both technically and aesthetically.
Geir Nustad
Glassblowing
Freehand blown and cut glass. Stand from glass Métier Story Atelier
Story

Geir Nustad sees his works as reflections, objects that depict change over time. His main source of inspiration comes from nature in Norway and the mountains around Tromsø with their extreme elements that reflect the difference between winter and summer, dark and light. The thinking behind his “Waves” series is to explore form, patterns and colours and challenge the technical and aesthetic possibilities of glass. “Waves” focuses on the strong contrast between the exterior and interior, the dark and the colourful, exploring the limits of what is possible within the material of glass, creating a floating bridge between art, craft and design.

Atelier

Métier

Freehand blown glass in filigree with a heat treatment to change the exterior expression of the glass.

Maison

Métier

Freehand blown glass in filigree with a heat treatment to change the exterior expression of the glass.

Biography

Geir Nustad

Geir Nustad was born in Tromsø, in the north of Norway. He moved to Kosta, Sweden in 2006 to begin his studies to become a glassblower at the Kosta Glascenter (Kosta Boda) where he was taught the famous Grail technique and from which he graduated in 2009. He continued actively to search for his own expression with glass and the same year Geir started to study in the Glass Department at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and graduated in 2012. He now works from Amsterdam. Through his works, Geir intends to create a bridge between craft, design and fine arts in order to create a deeper connection between the object or sculpture and the spectator. His artistic practice stretches from drawing and painting to creation of objects, sculptures and installations, mainly made of glass.

Netherlands  Wave – celadon egg Glass Sculpture This egg-shaped blown glass sculpture stands on glass. Geir Nustad's exploration of colour, patterns and textures could trick the viewer into thinking this work is made from turned wood. The strong contrast between the exterior and interior of the sculpture, the dark and the colourful, challenges what is possible when working with glass, both technically and aesthetically.
Geir Nustad
Glassblowing
Freehand blown and cut glass. Stand from glass Métier Story Atelier
Story

Geir Nustad sees his works as reflections, objects that depict change over time. His main source of inspiration comes from nature in Norway and the mountains around Tromsø with their extreme elements that reflect the difference between winter and summer, dark and light. The thinking behind his “Waves” series is to explore form, patterns and colours and challenge the technical and aesthetic possibilities of glass. “Waves” focuses on the strong contrast between the exterior and interior, the dark and the colourful, exploring the limits of what is possible within the material of glass, creating a floating bridge between art, craft and design.

Atelier

Métier

Freehand blown glass in filigree with a heat treatment to change the exterior expression of the glass.

Maison

Métier

Freehand blown glass in filigree with a heat treatment to change the exterior expression of the glass.

Biography

Geir Nustad

Geir Nustad was born in Tromsø, in the north of Norway. He moved to Kosta, Sweden in 2006 to begin his studies to become a glassblower at the Kosta Glascenter (Kosta Boda) where he was taught the famous Grail technique and from which he graduated in 2009. He continued actively to search for his own expression with glass and the same year Geir started to study in the Glass Department at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and graduated in 2012. He now works from Amsterdam. Through his works, Geir intends to create a bridge between craft, design and fine arts in order to create a deeper connection between the object or sculpture and the spectator. His artistic practice stretches from drawing and painting to creation of objects, sculptures and installations, mainly made of glass.

Italy  Impressione d'Autunno
courtesy of: Courtesy Caterina Tognon , Venezia
Glass Sculpture A colourless cone-shaped borosilicate glass vase holds a blossoming Murano glass bouquet with dry looking stems. Peony kopper kettle flowers vary from light pink to brown shades and oak acorns hang from the end of branches flanked with dry leaves. Bright red berries contrast with the wilted autumn flowers and oak leaves.
Lilla Tabasso
Lampworking
Murano glass vase and lampworked bouquet Métier Story Atelier
Story

Thanks to her past studies in botany and her “golden-hands”, Lilla Tabasso’s works revert back to the “still life” genre, and give shape to an iper-verismo (hyper-realism) and an extreme naturalism. By placing itself on a scale of micro-detail within the forms and colours of every flower, this research analyses with lucidity and detachment how the expressive potentialities of nature exceed those of humankind.

Atelier

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Maison

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Biography

Lilla Tabasso

Lilla Tabasso was born in Milan in 1973, the city where she now lives and works. Following her studies at the Faculty of Biology at the University in Milan, she began working with Murano glass using the ancient techniques of blowing and modelling. Her initial studies in biology are a key component to her research, which focuses on botany. Her still life works of incredible realism depict vases with flowers and draw from the infinite palette of nature’s colours and translucency. Fundamental to Lilla’s depiction are shades, mutations and imperfections: dry branches, faded flowers and wilting leaves. By focusing in such micro-detail on the forms and colours of every flower, Lilla’s works analyse how the expressive potential of nature exceeds that of mankind.

Italy  Rosa Canina (dog-rose)
courtesy of: Courtesy Caterina Tognon , Venezia
Glass Sculpture White dog-rose petals have started to wilt. They maintain their white colour and orange pistil but contrast with the leaves and berries that have started to wither at the end of their green stems. The Murano glass bouquet stands upright inside a classically shaped borosilicate glass vase.
Lilla Tabasso
Lampworking
Murano glass vase and lampworked bouquet Métier Story Atelier
Story

Thanks to her past studies in botany and her “golden-hands”, Lilla Tabasso’s works revert back to the “still life” genre, and give shape to an iper-verismo (hyper-realism) and an extreme naturalism. By placing itself on a scale of micro-detail within the forms and colours of every flower, this research analyses with lucidity and detachment how the expressive potentialities of nature exceed those of humankind.

Atelier

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Maison

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Biography

Lilla Tabasso

Lilla Tabasso was born in Milan in 1973, the city where she now lives and works. Following her studies at the Faculty of Biology at the University in Milan, she began working with Murano glass using the ancient techniques of blowing and modelling. Her initial studies in biology are a key component to her research, which focuses on botany. Her still life works of incredible realism depict vases with flowers and draw from the infinite palette of nature’s colours and translucency. Fundamental to Lilla’s depiction are shades, mutations and imperfections: dry branches, faded flowers and wilting leaves. By focusing in such micro-detail on the forms and colours of every flower, Lilla’s works analyse how the expressive potential of nature exceeds that of mankind.

Italy  Vanitas (vanity)
courtesy of: Courtesy Caterina Tognon, Venezia
Glass Sculpture A bouquet of once beautiful purple and white flowers made from lampworked Murano glass stands wilted and rotting, falling over the edge of a colourless borosilicate glass vase. The stems of the bouquet stand in murky brown water. The work's title, Vanity, questions the ephemeral nature of beauty.
Lilla Tabasso
Lampworking
Glass vase and lampworked bouquet Métier Story Atelier
Story

Thanks to her past studies in botany and her “golden-hands”, Lilla Tabasso’s works revert back to the “still life” genre and give shape to an iper-verismo (hyper-realism) and an extreme naturalism. By placing itself on a scale of micro-detail within the forms and colours of every flower, this research analyses with lucidity and detachment how the expressive potentialities of nature exceed those of humankind.

Atelier

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Maison

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Biography

Lilla Tabasso

Lilla Tabasso was born in Milan in 1973, the city where she now lives and works. Following her studies at the Faculty of Biology at the University in Milan, she began working with Murano glass using the ancient techniques of blowing and modelling. Her initial studies in biology are a key component to her research, which focuses on botany. Her still life works of incredible realism depict vases with flowers and draw from the infinite palette of nature’s colours and translucency. Fundamental to Lilla’s depiction are shades, mutations and imperfections: dry branches, faded flowers and wilting leaves. By focusing in such micro-detail on the forms and colours of every flower, Lilla’s works analyse how the expressive potential of nature exceeds that of mankind.

Italy  Red and White Peonies
courtesy of: Courtesy Caterina Tognon , Venezia
Glass Sculpture A bunch of blossoming red and white lampworked Murano glass peonies is placed in a colourless borosilicate glass vase.
Lilla Tabasso
Lampworking
Glass vase with lampworked bouquet Métier Story Atelier
Story

Thanks to her past studies in botany and her “golden hands”, Lilla Tabasso’s works revert back to the still life genre and give shape to an iper-verismo (hyper-realism) and an extreme naturalism. By placing itself on a scale of micro-detail within the forms and colours of every flower, this research analyses with lucidity and detachment how the expressive potentialities of nature exceed those of humankind.

Atelier

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Maison

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Contact

Lilla Tabasso

via D.Cimarosa 10 20144 Milan
+39 3334963696
lillatabasso1@hotmail.it

Métier

Lampworked glass using rods of Murano glass. A torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state the glass can be shaped through movement or through blowing.

Biography

Lilla Tabasso

Lilla Tabasso was born in Milan in 1973, the city where she now lives and works. Following her studies at the Faculty of Biology at the University in Milan, she began working with Murano glass using the ancient techniques of blowing and modelling. Her initial studies in biology are a key component to her research, which focuses on botany. Her still life works of incredible realism depict vases with flowers and draw from the infinite palette of nature’s colours and translucency. Fundamental to Lilla’s depiction are shades, mutations and imperfections: dry branches, faded flowers and wilting leaves. By focusing in such micro-detail on the forms and colours of every flower, Lilla’s works analyse how the expressive potential of nature exceeds that of mankind.

United Kingdom  Two Leaning Vessels Ceramic sculpture These two handmade ochre yellow porcelain structures have been formed on a lathe, by removing material from previously thrown vessels. The juxtaposed discs that run down the two leaning vessels explore the ambiguous occupation and containment of space.
Nicholas Lees
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Through his sculptural works, Nicholas Lees interrogates the relationship between what is solid and material and what is mystical and ephemeral. His works explore uncertainties, objects that are contained within boundaries or across thresholds. This uncertainty is at the core of his research. How can he create a physical and special representation of a blurred and uncertain edge, the penumbra, half-light, of material? Within this body of work, edges can be seen and felt through cast shadows. The presence of the object on the surface floats and shifts according to perception.

Atelier

Métier

The objects are made from parian porcelain, first thrown on the wheel as thick walled vessels and then turned on a lathe. They are intensively hand crafted, before being carefully slow dried. Firing changes the morphology of the unfired shape, creating movement. Controlled imperfections arise through the action of heat.

Maison

Contact

Nicholas Lees Studio

The Plestor GU34 3JQ Selborne
+44 7875 704490
nicholas.lees@network.rca.ac.uk
www.nicholaslees.com

Contact

Nicholas Lees Studio

The Plestor GU34 3JQ Selborne
+44 7875 704490
nicholas.lees@network.rca.ac.uk
www.nicholaslees.com

Métier

The objects are made from parian porcelain, first thrown on the wheel as thick walled vessels and then turned on a lathe. They are intensively hand crafted, before being carefully slow dried. Firing changes the morphology of the unfired shape, creating movement. Controlled imperfections arise through the action of heat.

Biography

Nicholas Lees

Nicholas Lees’ materials for sculpture are porcelain, space and light. While Nicholas first studied English and History at the University of Kent, his interest quickly turned to ceramics and he undertook a second BA in Ceramics at Bristol Polytechnic and an MA in Ceramics at the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff. His works question the physical elements in the relationship between the object and the body of the viewer, which deal directly with perceptual phenomena. What is seen and understood of solidity and materials shifts according to the relationship between the object, space, light and the eye of the viewer. The presence of the object on the surface floats and shifts according to perception. Nicholas’ work can be found in several international museum collections.

Italy  Cocco Pesce (Coconut Fish) Metal sculpture This zoomorphic decorative silver object is made around one central varnished coconut placed on a sterling silver base. Silverwork and pink tourmaline stones ornament the coconut to create an animal-like object. The different parts can be dismantled using pins and screws.
Tommaso Pestelli
Silversmith
Decorative metal piece Métier Story Atelier
Story

Precious pieces created by Pestelli Creazioni reflect styles and atmospheres from the past and combine classical silverwork with contemporary designs. The workshop's creations are entirely made by hand. The design and the technical execution of these detailed pieces are the result of Tommaso Pestelli’s early encounter with classical silver and gold work in the family workshop. He grew up surrounded by beautiful and elegant objects as well as drawings of jewellery samples that reflected refined tastes of bygone times. Tommaso fell in love with this world, its techniques and designs, adding to them with his own acquired style as time passed. Tommaso has been joined in his studio and in his pursuit of beauty by Eva Aulmann, a graphic artist with innovative and inspirational ideas, who is also his wife.

Atelier

Pestelli Creazioni was established in Florence in 1908 by Edoardo Pestelli, who had previously worked for the jewellers Marchesini. This experience helped establish the new workshop, which became an immediate success with international nobility and affluent people. The Pestelli legacy has been passed down from father to son, and is now in the hands of his great-grandson, Tommaso Pestelli , and his wife Eva. Some of the Pestelli family’s creations are exhibited in the permanent collection of the Contemporary Jewellery collection in the Museo degli Argenti (Silver Museum), in Florence. In 2011, the Pestelli company was added to the Italian Historical Businesses Register.

Métier

Cocco Pesce was assembled using chiselled and engraved silver as well as the cire-perdu technique of casting.

Maison

Pestelli Creazioni was established in Florence in 1908 by Edoardo Pestelli, who had previously worked for the jewellers Marchesini. This experience helped establish the new workshop, which became an immediate success with international nobility and affluent people. The Pestelli legacy has been passed down from father to son, and is now in the hands of his great-grandson, Tommaso Pestelli , and his wife Eva. Some of the Pestelli family’s creations are exhibited in the permanent collection of the Contemporary Jewellery collection in the Museo degli Argenti (Silver Museum), in Florence. In 2011, the Pestelli company was added to the Italian Historical Businesses Register.

Contact

Tommaso Pestelli

Via Borgo SS. Apostoli, 20/r 50123 Florence
+39 552302488
info@pestelli.com
www.pestelli.com

Contact

Tommaso Pestelli

Via Borgo SS. Apostoli, 20/r 50123 Florence
+39 552302488
info@pestelli.com
www.pestelli.com

Métier

Cocco Pesce was assembled using chiselled and engraved silver as well as the cire-perdu technique of casting.

Biography

Tommaso Pestelli

Tommaso Pestelli’s career began in the family workshop. Here he absorbed knowledge though observation. Tommaso continued to work on the traditional artisanship he had learnt alongside masters of the trade when undertaking studies at the Florentine Academy of Fine Arts and at the "Opificio delle Pietre Dure". Here he qualified as a restorer in glyptic and goldsmith's art. Today, using traditional techniques and technical expertise, combined with originality and creativity, Tommaso and his wife Eva create fine jewellery, collectibles and home accessories made of gold, silver and semi-precious stones, inspired by the sense of style and atmosphere of the past. Some of Tommaso's jewellery is on display in the permanent collection at the Museo degli Argenti in Florence, at the Uffizi Gallery and international galleries.

Italy  Nautilus Drago Metal sculpture A carefully placed sliver dragon digs its claws into the sides of a mother of pearl Nautilus shell. The shell is held up by a silver stem connected to a silver scallop shell.
Tommaso Pestelli
Silversmith
Silver 925 object with decorated Nautilus shell Métier Story Atelier
Story

Precious pieces created by Pestelli Creazioni reflect styles and atmospheres from the past and combine classical silverwork with contemporary designs. The workshop's creations are entirely made by hand. The design and the technical execution of these detailed pieces are the result of Tommaso Pestelli’s early encounter with classical silver and gold work in the family workshop. He grew up surrounded by beautiful and elegant objects as well as drawings of jewellery samples that reflected refined tastes of bygone times. Tommaso fell in love with this world, its techniques and designs, adding to them with his own acquired style as time passed. Tommaso has been joined in his studio and in his pursuit of beauty by Eva Aulmann, a graphic artist with innovative and inspirational ideas, who is also his wife.

Atelier

Pestelli Creazioni was established in Florence in 1908 by Edoardo Pestelli, who had previously worked for the jewellers Marchesini. This experience helped establish the new workshop, which became an immediate success with international nobility and affluent people. The Pestelli legacy has been passed down from father to son, and is now in the hands of his great-grandson, Tommaso Pestelli , and his wife Eva. Some of the Pestelli family’s creations are exhibited in the permanent collection of the Contemporary Jewellery collection in the Museo degli Argenti (Silver Museum), in Florence. In 2011, the Pestelli company was added to the Italian Historical Businesses Register.

Métier

This piece was assembled using chiselled and engraved silver as well as the cire-perdu technique of casting.

Maison

Pestelli Creazioni was established in Florence in 1908 by Edoardo Pestelli, who had previously worked for the jewellers Marchesini. This experience helped establish the new workshop, which became an immediate success with international nobility and affluent people. The Pestelli legacy has been passed down from father to son, and is now in the hands of his great-grandson, Tommaso Pestelli , and his wife Eva. Some of the Pestelli family’s creations are exhibited in the permanent collection of the Contemporary Jewellery collection in the Museo degli Argenti (Silver Museum), in Florence. In 2011, the Pestelli company was added to the Italian Historical Businesses Register.

Contact

Tommaso Pestelli

Via Borgo SS. Apostoli, 20/r 50123 Florence
+39 552302488
info@pestelli.com
www.pestelli.com

Contact

Tommaso Pestelli

Via Borgo SS. Apostoli, 20/r 50123 Florence
+39 552302488
info@pestelli.com
www.pestelli.com

Métier

This piece was assembled using chiselled and engraved silver as well as the cire-perdu technique of casting.

Biography

Tommaso Pestelli

Tommaso Pestelli’s career began in the family workshop. Here he absorbed knowledge though observation. Tommaso continued to work on the traditional artisanship he had learnt alongside masters of the trade when undertaking studies at the Florentine Academy of Fine Arts and at the "Opificio delle Pietre Dure". Here he qualified as a restorer in glyptic and goldsmith's art. Today, using traditional techniques and technical expertise, combined with originality and creativity, Tommaso and his wife Eva create fine jewellery, collectibles and home accessories made of gold, silver and semi-precious stones, inspired by the sense of style and atmosphere of the past. Some of Tommaso's jewellery is on display in the permanent collection at the Museo degli Argenti in Florence, at the Uffizi Gallery and international galleries.

United Kingdom  Oncidium Cranberry
courtesy of: Vessel Gallery
Glass Sculpture This handmade fused glass South American “Oncidium Cranberry” orchid presents dotted pink and white petals and a light-pink dotted and white Labellum. The column of the orchid is made of yellow and white coloured glass. To capture the delicate detail of each orchid, these pieces are subjected to numerous firings to incorporate many hand cut fragments of glass.
Laura Hart
Glass fusing
Handmade fused and slumped glass orchid. Métier Story Atelier
Story

Laura Hart extends her knowledge and skills of 3D modelling to mould designs for glasswork. Laura’s work revolves around the conservation of endangered flora and fauna. Through her fine glass creations, Laura has developed a unique style of delicate naturalism, celebrating the sublime architecture of nature, while emphasising the fragility of each species. Her collections of fused and kiln formed glass orchids as well as wild flowers are strongly influenced by Georgia O’Keefe’s large-scale flower paintings.

Atelier

Métier

Kiln formed glass techniques use high temperatures in a kiln to shape glass. Laura Hart specialises in fused glass where in a basic fusing process, the object will start as multiple pieces of glass heated enough that they bond together. To capture the delicate detail of each orchid, these pieces are subjected to numerous firings to incorporate many hand cut fragments of glass.

Maison

Contact

Vessel Gallery

114 Kensington Park Road W11 2PW London
+44 207 727 8001
info@vesselgallery.com
hartglass.com

Contact

Vessel Gallery

114 Kensington Park Road W11 2PW London
+44 207 727 8001
info@vesselgallery.com
hartglass.com

Métier

Kiln formed glass techniques use high temperatures in a kiln to shape glass. Laura Hart specialises in fused glass where in a basic fusing process, the object will start as multiple pieces of glass heated enough that they bond together. To capture the delicate detail of each orchid, these pieces are subjected to numerous firings to incorporate many hand cut fragments of glass.

Biography

Laura Hart

Suffolk glass artist Laura Hart creates fine art glass sculpture and functional glass tableware from her studio in rural Cavendish. She specialises in fused and kiln formed glass orchids, glass wild flowers and meticulously detailed fused and cast glass butterflies. Laura’s work brings several traditional glass-making techniques together with the addition of sterling silver for anatomical detail. She specialises in fused glass production uniting 21st century 3D design applications with age-old traditional glass making techniques. From her well-equipped studio in Cavendish near Sudbury in Suffolk, Laura holds monthly two-day glass fusing workshops. The classes are open to all levels of experience from absolute beginners to veteran glass fusing fanatics.

United Kingdom  Miltonia Stectibilis Sunshine
courtesy of: Vessel Gallery
Glass Sculpture This handmade fused glass Miltonia Stectibilis Sunshine orchid presents light pink-yellow petals and a light pink-white labellum. The column of the orchid is made of yellow and white coloured glass. To capture the delicate detail of each orchid, these pieces are subjected to numerous firings to incorporate the many hand cut fragments of glass.
Laura Hart
Glass fusing
Handmade fused and slumped glass orchid. Métier Story Atelier
Story

Laura Hart extends her knowledge and skills of 3D modelling to mould designs for glasswork. Laura’s work revolves around the conservation of endangered flora and fauna. Through her fine glass creations, Laura has developed a unique style of delicate naturalism, celebrating the sublime architecture of nature, while emphasising the fragility of each species. Her collections of fused and kiln formed glass orchids as well as wild flowers are strongly influenced by Georgia O’Keefe’s large-scale flower paintings.

Atelier

Métier

Kiln formed glass techniques use high temperatures in a kiln to shape glass. Laura Hart specialises in fused glass where in a basic fusing process, the object will start as multiple pieces of glass heated enough that they bond together. To capture the delicate detail of each orchid, these pieces are subjected to numerous firings to incorporate many hand cut fragments of glass.

Maison

Contact

Vessel Gallery

114 Kensington Park Road W11 2PW London
+44 207 727 8001
info@vesselgallery.com
hartglass.com

Contact

Vessel Gallery

114 Kensington Park Road W11 2PW London
+44 207 727 8001
info@vesselgallery.com
hartglass.com

Métier

Kiln formed glass techniques use high temperatures in a kiln to shape glass. Laura Hart specialises in fused glass where in a basic fusing process, the object will start as multiple pieces of glass heated enough that they bond together. To capture the delicate detail of each orchid, these pieces are subjected to numerous firings to incorporate many hand cut fragments of glass.

Biography

Laura Hart

Suffolk glass artist Laura Hart creates fine art glass sculpture and functional glass tableware from her studio in rural Cavendish. She specialises in fused and kiln formed glass orchids, glass wild flowers and meticulously detailed fused and cast glass butterflies. Laura’s work brings several traditional glass-making techniques together with the addition of sterling silver for anatomical detail. She specialises in fused glass production uniting 21st century 3D design applications with age-old traditional glass making techniques. From her well-equipped studio in Cavendish near Sudbury in Suffolk, Laura holds monthly two-day glass fusing workshops. The classes are open to all levels of experience from absolute beginners to veteran glass fusing fanatics.

Italy  Spirale Bizantina Ceramic vessel This shallow yet wide terracotta plate is decorated with spiralling optical patterns that draw the viewer’s eye to the centre of the plate. The pattern is made from blue, green and red powdered metal oxides.
Saura Vignoli
Earthenware pottery
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Faenza was one of the central hubs of ceramics during the late Middle Ages, with ceramists of that time attempting to imitate the porcelain and painted ceramics imported from Asia and the Middle East. During the 16th century Faenza defined its own ceramic style by melding together Byzantine, Roman, Eastern and Islamic cultural elements. The decorative research that the Bottega Vignoli likes to call “Mediterranean” results from this tradition. In a similar manner to the 16th century, the clay used in the Bottega is extracted in lumps from the “calanchi” (badlands) and left outside to be exposed to the rain and cold in order to wash away the impurities. After being washed of organic residues the clay is chopped and bought back to the studio where it is shaped on a potter’s wheel.

Atelier

Ivana and Saura Vignoli opened Bottega Vignoli in 1976, following the historic tradition of the craft that has long been practised in the region of Faenza. The sisters combine rich traditions and training with contemporary innovations. Their research begins with the Renaissance tradition of majolica of Faenza. Spanish-Moorish, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic stylistic influences can be found separately or combined throughout their work. While some works clearly reflect the rich cultural tradition of the Mediterranean, others diverge from this, producing truly original and innovative pieces. The outcome of ceramics production is often unique but Ivana and Saura do not only aim to create exclusive works. They also dedicate themselves to large-scale homogenous series for clients with whom they work on a regular basis.

Métier

Shaped on a potter’s wheel, the pottery is fired in a kiln at 960°C producing red iron-oxide terracotta. A white surface is then created using a glass-based coating. Powdered metal oxides are then used to decorate the surface. Finally, the ceramic is re-fired at 920°C.

Maison

Ivana and Saura Vignoli opened Bottega Vignoli in 1976, following the historic tradition of the craft that has long been practised in the region of Faenza. The sisters combine rich traditions and training with contemporary innovations. Their research begins with the Renaissance tradition of majolica of Faenza. Spanish-Moorish, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic stylistic influences can be found separately or combined throughout their work. While some works clearly reflect the rich cultural tradition of the Mediterranean, others diverge from this, producing truly original and innovative pieces. The outcome of ceramics production is often unique but Ivana and Saura do not only aim to create exclusive works. They also dedicate themselves to large-scale homogenous series for clients with whom they work on a regular basis.

Contact

Bottega Vignoli - Laboratory & Showroom

Via Fermi, 30, 48018 Faenza RA
+39 0546 621076
info@ceramichevignoli.com
www.ceramichevignoli.com

Contact

Bottega Vignoli - Laboratory & Showroom

Via Fermi, 30, 48018 Faenza RA
+39 0546 621076
info@ceramichevignoli.com
www.ceramichevignoli.com

Métier

Shaped on a potter’s wheel, the pottery is fired in a kiln at 960°C producing red iron-oxide terracotta. A white surface is then created using a glass-based coating. Powdered metal oxides are then used to decorate the surface. Finally, the ceramic is re-fired at 920°C.

Biography

Saura Vignoli

Ivana and Saura Vignoli are sisters. They both graduated from the Ballardini Art School of Ceramics before opening their own workshop together in 1976, in Faenza. The sisters have regularly participated in international and national exhibitions and competitions.

Italy  Vaso Modanato Ceramic vessel A tall terracotta vase is decorated with a square pattern reminiscent of the square shapes on the interior underside of church domes. The vase has been decorated with powdered metal oxides.
Saura Vignoli
Earthenware pottery
Terracotta vase Métier Story Atelier
Story

Faenza was one of the central hubs of ceramics during the late Middle Ages, with ceramists of that time attempting to imitate the porcelain and painted ceramics imported from Asia and the Middle East. During the 16th century Faenza defined its own ceramic style by melding together Byzantine, Roman, Eastern and Islamic cultural elements. The decorative research that the Bottega Vignoli likes to call “Mediterranean” results from this tradition. In a similar manner to the 16th century, the clay used in the Bottega is extracted in lumps from the “calanchi” (badlands) and left outside to be exposed to the rain and cold in order to wash away the impurities. After being washed of organic residues the clay is chopped and bought back to the studio where it is shaped on a potter’s wheel.

Atelier

Ivana and Saura Vignoli opened Bottega Vignoli in 1976, following the historic tradition of the craft that has long been practised in the region of Faenza. The sisters combine rich traditions and training with contemporary innovations. Their research begins with the Renaissance tradition of majolica of Faenza. Spanish-Moorish, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic stylistic influences can be found separately or combined throughout their work. While some works clearly reflect the rich cultural tradition of the Mediterranean, others diverge from this, producing truly original and innovative pieces. The outcome of ceramics production is often unique but Ivana and Saura do not only aim to create exclusive works. They also dedicate themselves to large-scale homogenous series for clients with whom they work on a regular basis.

Métier

Shaped on a potter’s wheel, the pottery is fired in a kiln at 960°C producing red iron-oxide terracotta. A white surface is then created using a glass-based coating. Powdered metal oxides are then used to decorate the surface. Finally, the ceramic is re-fired at 920°C.

Maison

Ivana and Saura Vignoli opened Bottega Vignoli in 1976, following the historic tradition of the craft that has long been practised in the region of Faenza. The sisters combine rich traditions and training with contemporary innovations. Their research begins with the Renaissance tradition of majolica of Faenza. Spanish-Moorish, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic stylistic influences can be found separately or combined throughout their work. While some works clearly reflect the rich cultural tradition of the Mediterranean, others diverge from this, producing truly original and innovative pieces. The outcome of ceramics production is often unique but Ivana and Saura do not only aim to create exclusive works. They also dedicate themselves to large-scale homogenous series for clients with whom they work on a regular basis.

Contact

Bottega Vignoli - Laboratory & Showroom

Via Fermi, 30, 48018 Faenza RA
+39 0546 621076
info@ceramichevignoli.com
www.ceramichevignoli.com

Contact

Bottega Vignoli - Laboratory & Showroom

Via Fermi, 30, 48018 Faenza RA
+39 0546 621076
info@ceramichevignoli.com
www.ceramichevignoli.com

Métier

Shaped on a potter’s wheel, the pottery is fired in a kiln at 960°C producing red iron-oxide terracotta. A white surface is then created using a glass-based coating. Powdered metal oxides are then used to decorate the surface. Finally, the ceramic is re-fired at 920°C.

Biography

Saura Vignoli

Ivana and Saura Vignoli are sisters. They both graduated from the Ballardini Art School of Ceramics before opening their own workshop together in 1976, in Faenza. The sisters have regularly participated in international and national exhibitions and competitions.

Italy  Vaso Palla Ceramic vessel This fired earthenware vase is extensively decorated with an intricate blue shade fish design.
Ivana Vignoli
Earthenware pottery
Terracotta vase Métier Story Atelier
Story

Faenza was one of the central hubs of ceramics during the late Middle Ages, with ceramists of that time attempting to imitate the porcelain and painted ceramics imported from Asia and the Middle East. During the 16th century Faenza defined its own ceramic style by melding together Byzantine, Roman, Eastern and Islamic cultural elements. The decorative research that the Bottega Vignoli likes to call “Mediterranean” results from this tradition. In a similar manner to the 16th century, the clay used in the Bottega is extracted in lumps from the “calanchi” (badlands) and left outside to be exposed to the rain and cold in order to wash away the impurities. After being washed of organic residues the clay is chopped and bought back to the studio where it is shaped on a potter’s wheel.

Atelier

Ivana and Saura Vignoli opened Bottega Vignoli in 1976, following the historic tradition of the craft that has long been practised in the region of Faenza. The sisters combine rich traditions and training with contemporary innovations. Their research begins with the Renaissance tradition of majolica of Faenza. Spanish-Moorish, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic stylistic influences can be found separately or combined throughout their work. While some works clearly reflect the rich cultural tradition of the Mediterranean, others diverge from this, producing truly original and innovative pieces. The outcome of ceramics production is often unique but Ivana and Saura do not only aim to create exclusive works. They also dedicate themselves to large-scale homogenous series for clients with whom they work on a regular basis.

Métier

Shaped on a potter’s wheel, the pottery is fired in a kiln at 960°C producing red iron-oxide terracotta. A white surface is then created using a glass-based coating. Powdered metal oxides are then used to decorate the surface. Finally, the ceramic is re-fired at 920°C.

Maison

Ivana and Saura Vignoli opened Bottega Vignoli in 1976, following the historic tradition of the craft that has long been practised in the region of Faenza. The sisters combine rich traditions and training with contemporary innovations. Their research begins with the Renaissance tradition of majolica of Faenza. Spanish-Moorish, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic stylistic influences can be found separately or combined throughout their work. While some works clearly reflect the rich cultural tradition of the Mediterranean, others diverge from this, producing truly original and innovative pieces. The outcome of ceramics production is often unique but Ivana and Saura do not only aim to create exclusive works. They also dedicate themselves to large-scale homogenous series for clients with whom they work on a regular basis.

Contact

Bottega Vignoli - Laboratory & Showroom

Via Fermi, 30, 48018 Faenza RA
+39 0546 621076
info@ceramichevignoli.com
www.ceramichevignoli.com

Contact

Bottega Vignoli - Laboratory & Showroom

Via Fermi, 30, 48018 Faenza RA
+39 0546 621076
info@ceramichevignoli.com
www.ceramichevignoli.com

Métier

Shaped on a potter’s wheel, the pottery is fired in a kiln at 960°C producing red iron-oxide terracotta. A white surface is then created using a glass-based coating. Powdered metal oxides are then used to decorate the surface. Finally, the ceramic is re-fired at 920°C.

Biography

Ivana Vignoli

Ivana and Saura Vignoli are sisters. They both graduated from the Ballardini Art School of Ceramics before opening their own workshop together in 1976, in Faenza. The sisters have regularly participated in international and national exhibitions and competitions.

United Kingdom  Talk to Me Metal vessel Seven silver and mixed metal vessels with a patinated finish, stand on stainless steel stilts. Talk To Me proposes a playful interpretation of museum displays. It references ancient pots and amphorae supported by metal tripods. However, unlike robust museum stands, this series of vessels on stilts communicates gestures and fragility.
Adi Toch
Metal-work
Metal pots - seven pieces Métier Story Atelier
Story

Vessels and containers are an innate method of communication. They convey a story of gathering, holding and storing. Not only do they surround us in our daily lives, they shape our perception of the division between inside and out and the notion of moving from one framed space into another. The practice of making vessels enables Adi Toch to work with both metal and space as materials, thereby redefining these borders. Through texturing, mark making, colouring and patination Adi creates a unique visual language with metal. She explores the morphological qualities of vessels and the process of embedding objects from the domestic landscape with spirit. Her work communicates through its sensory qualities and invites the observer to pick it up or look closely before revealing its story.

Atelier

Métier

Beginning with a flat sheet, Adi Toch forms the metal into hollow forms using hammers and tools. She creates unique surfaces through texturing, mark making, colouring and patination.

Maison

Contact

Adi Toch

+44 7972 872769
hello@aditoch.com
aditoch.com

Contact

Adi Toch

+44 7972 872769
hello@aditoch.com
aditoch.com

Métier

Beginning with a flat sheet, Adi Toch forms the metal into hollow forms using hammers and tools. She creates unique surfaces through texturing, mark making, colouring and patination.

Biography

Adi Toch

Adi Toch explores the visual language of metal through colour, movement, sound and tactility. She creates engaging objects that investigate the embodiment of vessels and containers. Her work begins with a flat sheet of metal and is entirely shaped by hand by means of tools such as hammers. Her work communicates through its sensory qualities and invites the observer to pick it up or look closely before revealing its story. Adi graduated from The Cass, London in 2009 with a Masters in Art, Design & Visual Culture, following her BA from Bezalel Art Academy in Jerusalem, metalwork department. Her work is exhibited internationally and included in major public collections such as the V&A Museum, London, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, National Museums Scotland, National Museum of Wales and The Jewish Museum, New York.

United Kingdom  Vivid in Motion Metal vessel Vivid in Motion explores the relationship between form, colour, movement and sound. This double-layered vessel contains loose stainless steel balls that can be seen from the opening, felt and heard, but not emptied. The content is shifted as the vessel moves, producing compelling sound.
Adi Toch
Metal-work
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Vessels and containers are an innate method of communication. They convey a story of gathering, holding and storing. Not only do they surround us in our daily lives, they shape our perception of the division between inside and out and the notion of moving from one framed space into another. The practice of making vessels enables Adi Toch to work with both metal and space as materials, thereby redefining these borders. Through texturing, mark making, colouring and patination Adi creates a unique visual language with metal. She explores the morphological qualities of vessels and the process of embedding objects from the domestic landscape with spirit. Her work communicates through its sensory qualities and invites the observer to pick it up or look closely before revealing its story.

Atelier

Métier

Beginning with a flat sheet, Adi Toch forms the metal into hollow forms using hammers and other tools. She creates unique surfaces through texturing, mark making, colouring and patination.

Maison

Contact

Adi Toch

+44 7972 872769
hello@aditoch.com
aditoch.com

Contact

Adi Toch

+44 7972 872769
hello@aditoch.com
aditoch.com

Métier

Beginning with a flat sheet, Adi Toch forms the metal into hollow forms using hammers and other tools. She creates unique surfaces through texturing, mark making, colouring and patination.

Biography

Adi Toch

Adi Toch explores the visual language of metal through colour, movement, sound and tactility. She creates engaging objects that investigate the embodiment of vessels and containers. Her work begins with a flat sheet of metal and is entirely shaped by hand by means of tools such as hammers. Her work communicates through its sensory qualities and invites the observer to pick it up or look closely before revealing its story. Adi graduated from The Cass, London in 2009 with a Masters in Art, Design & Visual Culture, following her BA from Bezalel Art Academy in Jerusalem, metalwork department. Her work is exhibited internationally and included in major public collections such as the V&A Museum, London, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, National Museums Scotland, National Museum of Wales and The Jewish Museum, New York.

France  Lianes Ceramic sculpture This piece is part of a series of sculptures and wall installations depicting tree creepers. This white porcelain sculpture depicting the twisted leaves and stems of tree creepers stands on several delicate porcelain legs. The sculpture invites viewers to immerse themselves in a living and ambiguous tropical vegetation.
Alice Riehl
Ceramicist
Porcelain sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Alice Riehl embraces the heritage of French Decorative Art, ornamental and porcelain, and turns it into a sculptural material that spreads endlessly in her wall art installations. Each handmade detail is carefully contemplated, emphasising its lightness and sensuality. Nature, under a metaphorical and idealised shape, is at the heart of her porcelain sculptures. To fully and personally appropriate this medium, Alice has combined it with laces from the very beginning. This comes from her family inheritance. Moving beyond the memory of her grandmother crocheting lace, Alice masters this material, printing vibrant textile geometrical forms on the surface of her porcelain sculptures, building personal sculptural works.

Atelier

Métier

Porcelain is hand modelled without any mould. Lace is used to texture patterns on the wet porcelain, which is then covered with a tin oxide glaze. The clay is fired at a high temperature.

Maison

Contact

Alice Riehl

Paris
+33 6 09 43 08 51
contact@aliceriehl.com
www.aliceriehl.com

Contact

Alice Riehl

Paris
+33 6 09 43 08 51
contact@aliceriehl.com
www.aliceriehl.com

Métier

Porcelain is hand modelled without any mould. Lace is used to texture patterns on the wet porcelain, which is then covered with a tin oxide glaze. The clay is fired at a high temperature.

Biography

Alice Riehl

Nature comes to life and blooms in the intricate refinement of Alice Riehl’s work. Alice discovered porcelain while training at the French Ceramic Institute in Sèvres, France. It has since become her medium of predilection. Her family heritage being linked to that of lacework, it came as a natural choice to combine this medium with her porcelain production. The lace texture effect signs her work. Alice models her works entirely by hand without using any moulds. Each piece is therefore unique. She produces sculptures as well as porcelain wall installations. Nature is at the centre of Alice’s inspiration and work. Her work is found in private and public spaces in Europe, America, the Middle East and Asia.

France  Lignage Ceramic sculpture This white porcelain sculpture is inspired by the representation of family in genealogical trees and family portraits. Reflecting the hereditary characteristics of a lineage and its interactions, body and vegetation closely combine.
Alice Riehl
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Alice Riehl embraces the heritage of French Decorative Art, ornamental and porcelain, and turns it into a sculptural material that spreads endlessly in her wall art installations. Each handmade detail is carefully considered, emphasising its lightness and sensuality. Nature, under a metaphorical and idealised shape, is at the heart of her porcelain sculptures. To fully and personally appropriate this medium, Alice has from the very beginning combined it with lace. This idea is inspired by her family inheritance. Drawing on the memory of her grandmother crocheting lace, Alice prints vibrant textile geometrical forms on the surface of her porcelain sculptures, building personal sculptural works.

Atelier

Métier

Porcelain is hand modelled without any mould. Lace is used to texture patterns on the wet porcelain that is then covered with a tin oxide tainted glaze. The clay is fired at a high temperature.

Maison

Contact

Alice Riehl

Paris
+33 6 09 43 08 51
contact@aliceriehl.com
www.aliceriehl.com

Contact

Alice Riehl

Paris
+33 6 09 43 08 51
contact@aliceriehl.com
www.aliceriehl.com

Métier

Porcelain is hand modelled without any mould. Lace is used to texture patterns on the wet porcelain that is then covered with a tin oxide tainted glaze. The clay is fired at a high temperature.

Biography

Alice Riehl

Nature comes to life and blooms in the intricate refinement of Alice Riehl’s work. Alice discovered porcelain while training at the French Ceramic Institute in Sèvres, France. It has since become her medium of predilection. Her family heritage being linked to that of lacework, it came as a natural choice to combine this medium with her porcelain production. The lace texture effect signs her work. Alice models her works entirely by hand without using any moulds. Each piece is therefore unique. She produces sculptures as well as porcelain wall installations. Nature is at the centre of Alice’s inspiration and work. Her work is found in private and public spaces in Europe, America, the Middle East and Asia.

Spain  De objetos y de muros (Of objects and walls)
courtesy of: Officine Saffi
Ceramic sculpture Rafael Pérez creates a woven basket-like structure from black earthenware covered in white porcelain strips. Much of the surface of the porcelain is fissured, exposing the black earthenware below.
Rafael Pérez
Ceramicist
Porcelain and black earthenware sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Rafael Pérez’s works reflect a ceramic world of innovative, guided and controlled paradoxes. Rafael works with master materials that react to heat in different ways, producing ceramics in a controlled yet unpredictable symbiosis with the kiln. Rafael overlays black earthenware and white porcelain clay, two materials that react to heat in different ways when fired. Fired earthenware expands while white porcelain remains static, causing the black earthenware under-layer to tear through the static porcelain. Upon opening the kiln, Rafael takes pleasure in first discovering his works transformed by eruptions of black clay and jagged rifts in the white porcelain. He considers his works to be good when he opens the kiln and, not recognising the pieces as his, gets a surprise.

Atelier

White porcelain and black earthenware are combined and fired at 1150 degrees. The two clays react differently to heat. While earthenware expands, the other stays inert. The black earthenware therefore breaks through the ceramic.

Métier

White porcelain and black earthenware are combined and fired at 1150°C. The two clays react differently to heat. While earthenware expands, the other stays inert. The black earthenware therefore breaks through the ceramic.

Maison

Contact

​Rafa Perez​​

Breton Herreros 17 26200 Haro
+49 211.17 80 9 830
​​​​​​​​​​rafapharo@yahoo.es
rafaperez.es

Contact

​Rafa Perez​​

Breton Herreros 17 26200 Haro
+49 211.17 80 9 830
​​​​​​​​​​rafapharo@yahoo.es
rafaperez.es

Métier

White porcelain and black earthenware are combined and fired at 1150°C. The two clays react differently to heat. While earthenware expands, the other stays inert. The black earthenware therefore breaks through the ceramic.

Biography

Rafael Pérez

Rafael Perez was born in Haro, La Rioja, Spain in 1957. At first, he studied economics but quickly decided to leave these studies aside and dedicate himself to art. He has exhibited his work in Spain as well as internationally, and has received numerous awards.

Hungary  Untitled
courtesy of: Officine Saffi
Ceramic sculpture These porcelain shapes evoke the image of simple, microscopic beings. They are like the shells of diatoms which, in this size, display geometric traits of order evident in basic natural structures such as barren bones, or leaves. The white opaqueness highlights a bone-like nature.
Zsolt József Simon
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Simon Zsolt József would be saddened if viewers of his objects, which are “frozen in a motionless state”, would only see them as “dead”. These objects were given life and took shape through work, life and motion. These shapes evoke the image of simple, microscopic beings. Beings with a true medium of moisture, a lifelike, flowing world. They are like the shells of diatoms that in this size display the traits of order apparent in the kingdom of plants and animals, occasionally imitating the diffuse systems of barren skeletons, branches, or leaves. The white opaqueness highlights a bone-like nature, while the yellow colour moves our imagination towards a flower or fruit-like form. The grey colour tends to bring the interior darkness to the forefront.

Atelier

Métier

The starting point of Simon’s works has always been sketches from which he creates the basis for his mould. He makes multiple pieces of the mould. He cuts the moulds up and connects them together, loosely creating gaps between the individual plaster elements. He then pours the excess slip out of the mould. Removing the plaster from the delicate porcelain surface takes the most concentration.

Maison

Contact

Simon Zsolt József

szsjindian@gmail.com
simonart.carbonmade.com

Contact

Simon Zsolt József

szsjindian@gmail.com
simonart.carbonmade.com

Métier

The starting point of Simon’s works has always been sketches from which he creates the basis for his mould. He makes multiple pieces of the mould. He cuts the moulds up and connects them together, loosely creating gaps between the individual plaster elements. He then pours the excess slip out of the mould. Removing the plaster from the delicate porcelain surface takes the most concentration.

Biography

Zsolt József Simon

Simon Zsolt József is a Hungarian ceramicist, painter, sculptor and designer. Simon studied porcelain painting (1988-1991) at Fischer Mor Porcelain Industrial Vocational School, Herend. Movement in sports and dance are important to him and are an integral part of his works. Upon graduating, Simon travelled around the world. During this time, he drew a lot, experimenting with drawing and developing a style true to himself and his passion for movement. Upon returning to Hungary, Simon started to adapt this drawing style to his work as a porcelain painter. Over the years, he complemented his previous studies with numerous others in music, drama, painting, teaching and design of porcelain production. Simon considers his sculptures, drawings and paintings to be studies of movements without real forms.

Hungary  Untitled
courtesy of: Officine Saffi
Ceramic sculpture This porcelain shape evokes the image of simple, microscopic beings. It is like the shells of diatoms which, in this size, display geometric traits of order evident in basic natural structures such as barren bones, or leaves. The yellow colour moves our imagination towards a flower or fruit-like form.
Zsolt József Simon
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Simon Zsolt József would be saddened if viewers of his objects, which are “frozen in a motionless state”, would only see them as “dead”. These objects were given life and took shape through work, life and motion. These shapes evoke the image of simple, microscopic beings. Beings with a true medium of moisture, a lifelike, flowing world. They are like the shells of diatoms that in this size display the traits of order apparent in the kingdom of plants and animals, occasionally imitating the diffuse systems of barren skeletons, branches, or leaves. The white opaqueness highlights a bone-like nature, while the yellow colour moves our imagination towards a flower or fruit-like form. The grey colour tends to bring the interior darkness to the forefront.

Atelier

Métier

The starting point of Simon’s works has always been sketches from which he creates the basis for his mould. He makes multiple pieces of the mould. He cuts the moulds up and connects them together, loosely creating gaps between the individual plaster elements. He then pours the excess slip out of the mould. Removing the plaster from the delicate porcelain surface takes the most concentration.

Maison

Contact

Simon Zsolt József

szsjindian@gmail.com
simonart.carbonmade.com

Contact

Simon Zsolt József

szsjindian@gmail.com
simonart.carbonmade.com

Métier

The starting point of Simon’s works has always been sketches from which he creates the basis for his mould. He makes multiple pieces of the mould. He cuts the moulds up and connects them together, loosely creating gaps between the individual plaster elements. He then pours the excess slip out of the mould. Removing the plaster from the delicate porcelain surface takes the most concentration.

Biography

Zsolt József Simon

Simon Zsolt József is a Hungarian ceramicist, painter, sculptor and designer. Simon studied porcelain painting (1988-1991) at Fischer Mor Porcelain Industrial Vocational School, Herend. Movement in sports and dance are important to him and are an integral part of his works. Upon graduating, Simon travelled around the world. During this time, he drew a lot, experimenting with drawing and developing a style true to himself and his passion for movement. Upon returning to Hungary, Simon started to adapt this drawing style to his work as a porcelain painter. Over the years, he complemented his previous studies with numerous others in music, drama, painting, teaching and design of porcelain production. Simon considers his sculptures, drawings and paintings to be studies of movements without real forms.

Hungary  Untitled
courtesy of: Officine Saffi
Ceramic sculpture These porcelain shapes evoke the image of simple, microscopic beings. They are like the shells of diatoms which, in this size, display geometric traits of order evident in basic natural structures such as barren bones or leaves. The grey colour tends to bring the interior darkness to the forefront.
Zsolt József Simon
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Simon Zsolt József would be saddened if viewers of his objects, which are “frozen in a motionless state”, would only see them as “dead”. These objects were given life and took shape through work, life and motion. These shapes evoke the image of simple, microscopic beings. Beings with a true medium of moisture, a lifelike, flowing world. They are like the shells of diatoms that in this size display the traits of order apparent in the kingdom of plants and animals, occasionally imitating the diffuse systems of barren skeletons, branches, or leaves. The white opaqueness highlights a bone-like nature, while the yellow colour moves our imagination towards a flower or fruit-like form. The grey colour tends to bring the interior darkness to the forefront.

Atelier

Métier

The starting point of Simon’s works has always been sketches from which he creates the basis for his mould. He makes multiple pieces of the mould. He cuts the moulds up and connects them together, loosely creating gaps between the individual plaster elements. He then pours the excess slip out of the mould. Removing the plaster from the delicate porcelain surface takes the most concentration.

Maison

Contact

Simon Zsolt József

szsjindian@gmail.com
simonart.carbonmade.com

Contact

Simon Zsolt József

szsjindian@gmail.com
simonart.carbonmade.com

Métier

The starting point of Simon’s works has always been sketches from which he creates the basis for his mould. He makes multiple pieces of the mould. He cuts the moulds up and connects them together, loosely creating gaps between the individual plaster elements. He then pours the excess slip out of the mould. Removing the plaster from the delicate porcelain surface takes the most concentration.

Biography

Zsolt József Simon

Simon Zsolt József is a Hungarian ceramicist, painter, sculptor and designer. Simon studied porcelain painting (1988-1991) at Fischer Mor Porcelain Industrial Vocational School, Herend. Movement in sports and dance are important to him and are an integral part of his works. Upon graduating, Simon travelled around the world. During this time, he drew a lot, experimenting with drawing and developing a style true to himself and his passion for movement. Upon returning to Hungary, Simon started to adapt this drawing style to his work as a porcelain painter. Over the years, he complemented his previous studies with numerous others in music, drama, painting, teaching and design of porcelain production. Simon considers his sculptures, drawings and paintings to be studies of movements without real forms.

Italy  Talea (Small), Talea (Medium)
courtesy of: Dilmos Milano
Decorative Four red lamellar structures composed of fine, alternating layers of red sheet vinyl strips have been fitted over metal and glass cylinders. The lamella layers have been superimposed or slid under one another creating a highly sensorial experience.
Daniele Papuli
Paper sculptor
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Daniele Papuli chose this material, vinyl, as an elected matter for his artistic research due to its flexibility when in strips, much like paper. The individual components that make up the object – strips, lamellae, tapes – lend a dynamic structure that is expressed through an articulated and uninterrupted game consisting of superimposing and sliding the various components. When placed side by side, the strips create a large vase in the shape of a corolla, petals of a flower as a unit, Talea.

Atelier

Métier

Cut strips of red vinyl sheet have attached to one another around central metal and glass cylinders. One by one, the strips are placed on one another.

Maison

Contact

Daniele Papuli

Milan
+39 02 2841960
info@danielepapuli.net
www.danielepapuli.net

Contact

Daniele Papuli

Milan
+39 02 2841960
info@danielepapuli.net
www.danielepapuli.net

Métier

Cut strips of red vinyl sheet have attached to one another around central metal and glass cylinders. One by one, the strips are placed on one another.

Biography

Daniele Papuli

After graduating in sculpture from the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Daniel Papuli settled in Milan where he still lives and works. He first experimented with sculpture at the start of the 1990’s, working with stone, wood and plaster. During an international workshop held in Berlin in 1993, Daniel was first introduced to the methods of paper manufacturing. He experimented with paper over the next few years making this his principal medium of creation, and in 1997 created his first paper sculpture. Since, Daniel has worked with publishers creating handmade sheets of paper. He continues to experiment with materials with similar structures and tactile properties to paper. He has exhibited his works internationally and they are found in private and public collections in Italy and abroad and in publications of paper art.

United Kingdom  Ferrous Shift II, 2018 Wood sculpture This carved and hollowed vessel has been sculpted from a single piece of sequoia. Sequoia grows at a different density during different times of the year and this property of the material has been used to transform the texture of the piece. A lathe is used to turn the initial shape and to hollow it out. It is then chiselled and sand blasted to expose the sinuous pattern formed by the uneven growth of the wood.
Eleanor Lakelin
Wood turning
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Eleanor Lakelin’s distinctive forms are created in response to the passage of time etched into the fibres of wood. She explores her fascination with the natural properties of this material using a traditional woodworking lathe, centuries-old chisels and gouges alongside modern techniques and tools. Wood provenance is of particular importance to Eleanor who only uses wood from trees felled in the British Isles, in particular ash and horse chestnut burr. She loves the fact that wood is not inert, it is living and has been living for centuries before our lifetime. It is important to her to have a dialogue and relationship with the material in order to work with it properly. Her forms are born from ideas such as the exploration of texture. Eleanor will pick a wood with properties that permit her to develop her idea to its fullest. Her works express erosion, the rhythm of time and the layers and fissures between creation and decay.

Atelier

Métier

The initial shape is created by turning wood on a lathe. The shape is then sandblasted and chiselled. Finally, the wood is treated with an iron solution to react with the tannic acid content of the wood.

Maison

Contact

Eleanor Lakelin

Studio 011, Cockpit Arts, 18-22 Creekside, Deptford SE8 3DZ London
(+44) 7944811675
eleanor@eleanorlakelin.com
eleanorlakelin.com

Contact

Eleanor Lakelin

Studio 011, Cockpit Arts, 18-22 Creekside, Deptford SE8 3DZ London
(+44) 7944811675
eleanor@eleanorlakelin.com
eleanorlakelin.com

Métier

The initial shape is created by turning wood on a lathe. The shape is then sandblasted and chiselled. Finally, the wood is treated with an iron solution to react with the tannic acid content of the wood.

Biography

Eleanor Lakelin

Eleanor Lakelin is a London based artist who grew up in a rural area of Wales immersed in nature. This understanding and love of natural material has informed her artistic life. She loves wood, its history and provenance and the fact that it is a living material. She has spent many years perfecting form and experimenting with how the properties of wood can be used to express the rhythm of time and our relationship to the earth. Eleanor exhibits extensively internationally and her pieces have won many awards and commendations. Her work is held in numerous prestigious collections worldwide.

Italy  Tropical Fossil Furniture One side of this bronze screen evokes stately church doors and their detailed engravings. The other, purified and contemporary, has a layering of patinas that conveys the effect of extreme depth on the thin surface.
Gianluca Pacchioni
Metal-work
Bronze screen Métier Story Atelier
Story

The title of the work refers to the 1960s Brazilian "Tropicalia" artistic movement that combined local culture with western avant-gardism. An amalgamation that fittingly describes Gianluca Pacchioni’s world and works, which combine French Classicism, Italian Baroque and Japanese Ren with tropical imagery. This starts in his workshop, a tropical island in the heart of the Milanese industrial district, and his loft, where numerous bamboo, banana leaves and exotic flowers have been fossilised inside his works. His works eternalise ephemeral plants under immutable layers of liquid metal. Tropical Fossil should at the same time be seen and interpreted as an architectural sculpture, a monument and a screen.

Atelier

Métier

The work presents a variety of techniques. Leaves are “fossilised” by creating differently textured moulds. Cold casting of the bronze is then used as a technique to minimise the bronze layer and therefore the final weight. On the other side, a one-millimetre brass sheet is used. There are around 30 hand-scratched elements on the patina, creating a visual depth. The two decorative panels are fixed on a waterproof wood structure and framed by four-millimetre thick solid brass.

Maison

Contact

Gianluca Pacchioni

Via Druso 2 20133 Milan
+39 0270121262
talkto@gianluca-pacchioni.com
www.gianluca-pacchioni.com

Contact

Gianluca Pacchioni

Via Druso 2 20133 Milan
+39 0270121262
talkto@gianluca-pacchioni.com
www.gianluca-pacchioni.com

Métier

The work presents a variety of techniques. Leaves are “fossilised” by creating differently textured moulds. Cold casting of the bronze is then used as a technique to minimise the bronze layer and therefore the final weight. On the other side, a one-millimetre brass sheet is used. There are around 30 hand-scratched elements on the patina, creating a visual depth. The two decorative panels are fixed on a waterproof wood structure and framed by four-millimetre thick solid brass.

Biography

Gianluca Pacchioni

After graduating in economics and business studies from the Bocconi University in Milan, Gianluca Pacchioni moved to Paris. There, during the nineties, he was plunged into the Paris art world and was overcome with a passion for sculpting metals. He experimented and learnt in an autodidact manner, in the studio shared with other artists at the Quai de la Gare. A desire to work in tandem with the flexibility, experience and creativity of Italian artists drove Gianluca to then move to Milan where he opened a workshop in a 1930s factory. Since then, the workshop has constantly forged sculptures and limited editions of furniture. The workshop only produces works with experimental and innovative working techniques. In 2014, one of his works was permanently exhibited as a symbol of Italian savoir-faire, at the entrance hall of the Italian Embassy in Paris

Ireland  Driftwood pouch with embedded stones Basket This handmade artistic basket has been made from driftwood and homegrown willow rods. Raw pieces of driftwood have been used to cover the opening of the brown basket.
Joe Hogan
Basket weaving
Hand woven basket Métier Story Atelier
Story

Joe Hogan's artistic baskets are usually inspired by materials that he finds during his walks in the woods. The nature of the discovery of these materials means that most of the baskets are unique and that it is usually quite complicated or impossible to make two the same. These baskets with wooden mouths combine the traditional techniques of basket making with contemporary sculpture-like designs.

Atelier

Métier

The baskets are made using willow grown on Joe Hogan’s farm. The willow must first be harvested, sorted and dried and then soaked for about 10 days to make it pliable enough for weaving using traditional basket-weaving techniques. In some shapes such as the driftwood pouch with embedded stone, Joe makes the basket upside down, completing the base of the basket last.

Maison

Contact

Joe Hogan

Loch na Fooey, Finny, Clonbur Galway
+353 9548241
joe@joehoganbaskets.com
www.joehoganbaskets.com

Contact

Joe Hogan

Loch na Fooey, Finny, Clonbur Galway
+353 9548241
joe@joehoganbaskets.com
www.joehoganbaskets.com

Métier

The baskets are made using willow grown on Joe Hogan’s farm. The willow must first be harvested, sorted and dried and then soaked for about 10 days to make it pliable enough for weaving using traditional basket-weaving techniques. In some shapes such as the driftwood pouch with embedded stone, Joe makes the basket upside down, completing the base of the basket last.

Biography

Joe Hogan

Joe Hogan has worked as a basket-maker since 1977 and opened his own workshop at Loch Na Fooey in the west of Ireland in 1978. He was drawn to basket making because it offered the possibility of living in that beautiful area and growing their own willow. For many years Joe concentrated on making functional baskets and improving his skills. He also researched and made most of the indigenous baskets of Ireland, the baskets that were used for fishing and farming. For the past 20 years, Joe has become increasingly interested in making artistic baskets. These are usually inspired by finds of wood. This work is prompted by a desire to develop a deeper connection to nature.

United Kingdom  Woven Vessel Basket This dark basket has been woven out of oxidised copper strips. Jodie has woven strips of metal together into geometric patterns. Woven Vessel is part of the larger “Vessel” series of woven baskets.
Jodie Hatcher
Metal-work
Métier Story Atelier
Story

With each piece, Jodie Hatcher challenges the processes and pushes the material to create her desired forms. She creates this series of woven vessels through a continual experimentation and exploration of weaving. Her aim with these woven metal sculptures is to intrigue the viewer and incite questions.

Atelier

Métier

Jodie Hatcher plans each vessel quite logically and mathematically. She weaves the sheet into a pattern piece, then repeatedly hammers and anneals the woven metal to create her desired form.

Maison

Contact

Jodie Hatcher

+44 7946215976
info@jodiehatcher.co.uk
www.jodiehatcher.co.uk

Contact

Jodie Hatcher

+44 7946215976
info@jodiehatcher.co.uk
www.jodiehatcher.co.uk

Métier

Jodie Hatcher plans each vessel quite logically and mathematically. She weaves the sheet into a pattern piece, then repeatedly hammers and anneals the woven metal to create her desired form.

Biography

Jodie Hatcher

The weaving process is central to Jodie Hatcher’s work and is always what drives her development. She graduated from De Montfort University, Leicester in 2011 in Design Crafts and has since gone on to exhibit her work around the UK and internationally. Jodie has experimented with traditional Japanese metal colouring and heat treatment methods during her new 'Vessel' collection to gain further understanding and control over the beautiful reds and orange colours she desires. Jodie’s intention for all her pieces is to both intrigue and to be questioned by the viewer. In 2015, Jodie was selected as the International artist for the Craft ACT Artist in Residence program in Canberra, Australia and earlier this year exhibited as part of the Masters of Modern exhibition in Munich.

France  Corail FROU FROU Ceramic sculpture The highly textured surface of this white porcelain sculpture is evocative of a seashell or coral. Differently shaped and textured porcelain elements bring variety to the design of this piece. The thin plates are joined together one by one to the surface of a central curved shape - a “big pebble”.
Marie Claude Korus
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Marik Korus’ medium of choice is porcelain, a material she works and shapes with an infinite degree of patience and meticulousness.

Atelier

Métier

Thin pieces of textured porcelain are placed one by one around a central form. The finished porcelain form is fired twice up to 1260 degrees centigrade.

Maison

Contact

Marik Korus

52, rue de la Bessure 17570 Saint Augustin
+33 660 28 09 37
marik.korus@wanadoo.fr
www.marik-korus.fr

Contact

Marik Korus

52, rue de la Bessure 17570 Saint Augustin
+33 660 28 09 37
marik.korus@wanadoo.fr
www.marik-korus.fr

Métier

Thin pieces of textured porcelain are placed one by one around a central form. The finished porcelain form is fired twice up to 1260 degrees centigrade.

Biography

Marie Claude Korus

Marik Korus (Marie Claude Korus) draws her inspiration from nature, the sea, architecture and details from her environment that capture her attention. She is continually inspired by the nature in Charente-Maritime, France, where she has lived for more than 15 years. Marik works with porcelain, which she finds offers infinite creative possibilities. At first, earth was simply an attractive medium for Marik, however she then found that by kneading, touching and transforming this material it provoked constant questions until the final firing of the earth. Having started from a discovery of the raw qualities of earth, Marik today seeks to increase its transparency and lightness.

France  Corail Acrospora Ceramic sculpture Differently shaped and textured porcelain elements worked on in an identical manner, but of different lengths and arranged side by side to create movement. These elements, small strips of textured earth, have been joined together by hand to a hollow porcelain base.
Marie Claude Korus
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Marik Korus’ medium of choice is porcelain, a material that she works and shapes with an infinite degree of patience and meticulousness.

Atelier

Métier

Thin pieces of textured porcelain elements are placed one by one around a central form. The finished porcelain form is fired twice up to 1260°C degrees.

Maison

Contact

Marik Korus

52, rue de la Bessure 17570 Saint Augustin
+33 660 28 09 37
marik.korus@wanadoo.fr
www.marik-korus.fr

Contact

Marik Korus

52, rue de la Bessure 17570 Saint Augustin
+33 660 28 09 37
marik.korus@wanadoo.fr
www.marik-korus.fr

Métier

Thin pieces of textured porcelain elements are placed one by one around a central form. The finished porcelain form is fired twice up to 1260°C degrees.

Biography

Marie Claude Korus

Marik Korus (Marie Claude Korus) draws her inspiration from nature, the sea, architecture and details from her environment that capture her attention. She is continually inspired by the nature in Charente-Maritime, France, where she has lived for more than 15 years. Marik works with porcelain, which she finds offers infinite creative possibilities. At first, earth was simply an attractive medium for Marik, however she then found that by kneading, touching and transforming this material it provoked constant questions until the final firing of the earth. Having started from a discovery of the raw qualities of earth, Marik today seeks to increase its transparency and lightness.

France  The Birth of the Viking Ships Wood sculpture Fifteen centrally connected boat-like tentacles are carved out from one piece of cherry wood. The rough texture of the acrylic painted interiors of the boats and their curved figurehead contrasts with their polished exteriors. This turned wood sculpture was inspired by Viking ships displayed at the Drakkar museum of Oslo.
Alain Mailland
Wood turning
Turned wood sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

All Alain Mailland’s works are based on the beauty of wood. He mainly uses precious roots and species from the South of France. Alain believes there is a correspondence between all the species living on earth and that animal or mineral shapes can be found in roots and vegetable forms as well as in stone or bones.

Atelier

Métier

One piece of cherry wood is hand turned on a lathe then carved, planed, textured, engraved and painted.

Maison

Contact

Alain Mailland

Prat-Nouvel, Route de Valmale 30530 Chamborigaud
0033 466 43 66 38
alain@mailland.fr
mailland.fr

Contact

Alain Mailland

Prat-Nouvel, Route de Valmale 30530 Chamborigaud
0033 466 43 66 38
alain@mailland.fr
mailland.fr

Métier

One piece of cherry wood is hand turned on a lathe then carved, planed, textured, engraved and painted.

Biography

Alain Mailland

Born in the Ivory Coast, Alain Mailland moved to Paris at the age of five where he lived until the end of his studies at the National Art School of Cergy-Pontoise. Following his studies, Alain first worked as a mason and carpenter. It was not until he was twenty-eight that he took his first course in woodturning. Alain created a company specialising in interior woodwork, yet he continued to turn wood as an amateur. However, during the early 1990s Alain slowly changed his focus from wood joining to woodturning, and has since dedicated himself exclusively to this craft. Alain soon developed his own distinctive style and technique, particularly in hollowing. He developed special tools to turn wood flowers, and then used this technique to turn and carve pieces evoking marine life or natural creatures. He also uses techniques such as steam bending, texturing and sandblasting. Alain is an internationally recognised wood turner and his works have been exhibited internationally. His works feature in a number of museums both in France and in the United States.

Germany  OPUS 48 Plastic sculpture Intending to capture ephemeral folds of fabric, a block of plastic has been stretched out creating a white translucent cavernous wave-like form. The organic folds and relief of OPUS 48 are accentuated by the inner light of the plinth upon which the piece has been placed.
Marlies von Soden
Plastic sculptor
Métier Story Atelier
Story

To Marlies Von Soden, costume and design sets create relief-like spatial impressions, the essence of which are found in the folds and twists of fabric. These by nature are ephemeral, continuously changing from one fold to another. Marlies’ sculptures capture and preserve these moments by playfully transferring them to a polypropylene medium. The outcome of this extruded material is organic. It resembles a medium that has been heated, and through a force of compression folded into itself. The medium permits Marlies to immortalise echoes of these fleeting moments.

Atelier

Métier

Through a process called extrusion, solid plastic is passed through a machine into a warm malleable state. Marlies Von Soden then shapes and organises the plastic until it cools down and regains its original rigidity.

Maison

Contact

Marlies Von Soden

Karl-schrader-str. 9 10781 Berlin
(+49) 3021755845
Info@marliesvonsoden.com
www.marliesvonsoden.com

Contact

Marlies Von Soden

Karl-schrader-str. 9 10781 Berlin
(+49) 3021755845
Info@marliesvonsoden.com
www.marliesvonsoden.com

Métier

Through a process called extrusion, solid plastic is passed through a machine into a warm malleable state. Marlies Von Soden then shapes and organises the plastic until it cools down and regains its original rigidity.

Biography

Marlies von Soden

Born in Hamburg, Marlies Von Soden studied design and costume at the Berlin University of Arts. Marlies worked on costume and set designs for the film and theatre industry for more than thirty years. Her works draw inspiration from this textile-filled experience, attempting to capture the fleeting folds of fabric. Marlies works with neoprene, tyvek® (polyethylene fleece) and phenolic foam. Her folded objects are displayed internationally in collections such as Madame Olivetti or in the Watermill Center, Robert Wilson’s Design Museum on Eastern Long Island.

Italy  Both Stone sculpture This sculpture has been carved out by hand from one block of Paonazzo marble. A circular shape has been cut out in the marble, guiding the viewer’s eye through the sculpture in such a way that the background becomes an integral part of the sculpture.
Mauro Mori
Stone sculptor
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Mauro Mori’s works are modelled by hand and not by machine.

Atelier

In 1994, Mauro Mori started his own business and in 1998 he inaugurated his own atelier, Mauro Mori Studio. In January 2014 Mauro founded Hand©, a non-profit association that helps people, artists and craftsmen suffering from physical or economic hardship or other stressful situations.

Métier

Sculpture hand carved from a single block of Paonazzo marble molded by using a classical subtraction method.

Maison

In 1994, Mauro Mori started his own business and in 1998 he inaugurated his own atelier, Mauro Mori Studio. In January 2014 Mauro founded Hand©, a non-profit association that helps people, artists and craftsmen suffering from physical or economic hardship or other stressful situations.

Contact

Mauro Mori Studio

Via Meda 37 20141 Milan
+39 02 7012 4518
info@mauromori.it
www.mauromori.it

Contact

Mauro Mori Studio

Via Meda 37 20141 Milan
+39 02 7012 4518
info@mauromori.it
www.mauromori.it

Métier

Sculpture hand carved from a single block of Paonazzo marble molded by using a classical subtraction method.

Biography

Mauro Mori

Mauro Mori has had the opportunity to meet various cultures and travel to unusual places. This has supplied the ideas on which his research is based. His works are moulded by hand bringing emotional and affective values using natural materials, exalting what nature has created. Solid blocks of natural material, moulded by the traditional subtraction method, form the basis of his works. Mauro often works his sculptures in the place of the material's origin, such as Albizia Rosa of Seychelles or marble worked directly at Carrara. The plasticity of the materials, the relief work and the outstanding craftsmanship are common threads running through all his work. His constant research is also shown by the work on metals, which are tooled in plate form and finished with oxidations and patinas.

Germany  Seaform 2014-99 Glass Sculpture A bright and dark orange glass form with points, evocative of shapes and patterns found in a coral reef. Patterns of seemingly fissured glass emerge from the handmade sculpture, created by the fusing of different glass elements in a mould.
Michael Behrens
Glass sculpture
Métier Story Atelier
Story

This is a bright and dark orange glass form with points, evocative of shapes and patterns found in a coral reef. Patterns of seemingly fissured glass emerge from the handmade sculpture, created by the fusing of different glass elements in a mould.

Atelier

Métier

Glass cast in a kiln. Optical glass with a colour overlay on the surface is melted in a mould. The melting and cooling process takes place in custom-built furnaces in Behrens' studio in Duesseldorf. The finish involves sandblasting, grinding and polishing.

Maison

Contact

Michael Behrens

Krahkampweg 75 D-40221 Düsseldorf
studio@michael-behrens.com
michael-behrens.com

Contact

Michael Behrens

Krahkampweg 75 D-40221 Düsseldorf
studio@michael-behrens.com
michael-behrens.com

Métier

Glass cast in a kiln. Optical glass with a colour overlay on the surface is melted in a mould. The melting and cooling process takes place in custom-built furnaces in Behrens' studio in Duesseldorf. The finish involves sandblasting, grinding and polishing.

Biography

Michael Behrens

Michael Behrens studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Maastricht, Netherlands, where he graduated with a Bachelor's degree in 2003. The use of colours inspired by the underwater world is central to Michael’s work. Shapes and structures remain in focus and define the dynamic aesthetic of his sculptures on both a micro and macroscopic level. Characteristics of his work include the fine relief-like modelling of the outer shape of his sculptures, the interplay of matt and polished surfaces, as well as cell-like structures emerging from fusing glass sections. An essential part of creating a new Seaform is the sculptural work on the rigid foam model. His work has been part of numerous solo and group exhibitions in Europe and the United States and Canada. He lives and works in Dusseldorf, Germany.

Poland  From the "TransForms Plus" series Ceramic sculpture A pair of porcelain vases with yellow and white slip decoration. The vases are cast from various fragments of plaster moulds which have been modified and joined to form a completely new mould. It deprives them of their earlier designed character and creates a sculpture with different rifted layers of sharp geometric shapes.
Monika Patuszynska
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Through her sculptures, Monika Patuszyńska challenges the use of everyday objects. She cuts and combines ordinary objects such as glasses, bowls and plates into sculptures. Her works are inspired by traditional ceramic objects and techniques. The traditions of Lower Silesian porcelain production have played a central role in her work. Using traditional casting techniques, Monika first combined a kettle and a cup in 1999. This unsuspecting first creation triggered a wave of experimentation, assembling fragments to create completely new forms to cast. This soon became a characteristic feature of her design.

Atelier

Métier

The pair of porcelain vases is cast from fragments of found plaster moulds modified and joined to form a completely new mould. It deprives them of their earlier designed character and allows Monika to define a new object.

Maison

Contact

Monika Patuszynska

+48 602 73 95 49
mpatuszynska@gmail.com
www.patuszynska.art.pl

Contact

Monika Patuszynska

+48 602 73 95 49
mpatuszynska@gmail.com
www.patuszynska.art.pl

Métier

The pair of porcelain vases is cast from fragments of found plaster moulds modified and joined to form a completely new mould. It deprives them of their earlier designed character and allows Monika to define a new object.

Biography

Monika Patuszynska

Born in Warsaw, Poland, artist and curator Monika Patuszyńska first became fascinated with ceramics while in high school in Denmark. Later while studying in Paris she was introduced to casting of ceramics, a technique that has been central to her work ever since. Monika received her MA from the Wroclaw Academy of Fine Arts (Poland) in 1999. The exploration of abandoned spaces and untried paths is central to her work. Monika opened her own studio in Milanówek near Warsaw in 2001. She frequently exhibits all over the world and has won many awards for her work, which is found in public and private collections worldwide. She is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics.

France  Grands Nids Metal sculpture This sculpture, made from bars of iron usually intended to make reinforced concrete, represents an oversized nest.
Frédérique Petit
Metal-work
Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

Pieces of iron rods usually used to make reinforced concrete are cut out. These are twisted and shaped to create the twigs of the nest. Then Frédérique Petit stacks them as harmoniously as possible and fixes them with a welding tip.

Maison

Contact

Frédérique Petit

+33 6 16 26 35 07
f.petit-charry@wanadoo.fr
www.frederiquepetit.com

Contact

Frédérique Petit

+33 6 16 26 35 07
f.petit-charry@wanadoo.fr
www.frederiquepetit.com

Métier

Pieces of iron rods usually used to make reinforced concrete are cut out. These are twisted and shaped to create the twigs of the nest. Then Frédérique Petit stacks them as harmoniously as possible and fixes them with a welding tip.

Biography

Frédérique Petit

Frédérique Petit has explored many art forms ranging from, piano, choir, and decoration to metalwork, but there is one common denominator to these: thread. Thread as weft or as chain, as a palette of colours or as architecture, from thin almost invisible silk thread to her later works that use iron rods. Frédérique discovered and learnt how to weave through self-learning and observing primitive looms at the Musée de l'Homme. She dedicated a good part of her career to the creation of tapestries, but in 2004, an ardent desire to explore other crafts pushed her to experiment with different materials. Paradoxically though, she uses her experience gained while making tapestries to weave her new materials. To Frédérique, a deep technical knowhow of the medium she uses is indispensable, however once mastered she strives to go push limits of her knowhow through the innovation of techniques.

France  Grands Nids Metal sculpture This sculpture, made from wire and bars of iron that are usually intended to make reinforced concrete, represents an oversized nest.
Frédérique Petit
Metal-work
Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

Pieces of iron rods usually used to make reinforced concrete are cut out. These are twisted and shaped to create the twigs of the nest. Then Frédérique Petit stacks them as harmoniously as possible and fixes them with a welding tip.

Maison

Contact

Frédérique Petit

+33 6 16 26 35 07
f.petit-charry@wanadoo.fr
www.frederiquepetit.com

Contact

Frédérique Petit

+33 6 16 26 35 07
f.petit-charry@wanadoo.fr
www.frederiquepetit.com

Métier

Pieces of iron rods usually used to make reinforced concrete are cut out. These are twisted and shaped to create the twigs of the nest. Then Frédérique Petit stacks them as harmoniously as possible and fixes them with a welding tip.

Biography

Frédérique Petit

Frédérique Petit has explored many art forms ranging from, piano, choir, and decoration to metalwork, but there is one common denominator to these: thread. Thread as weft or as chain, as a palette of colours or as architecture, from thin almost invisible silk thread to her later works that use iron rods. Frédérique discovered and learnt how to weave through self-learning and observing primitive looms at the Musée de l'Homme. She dedicated a good part of her career to the creation of tapestries, but in 2004, an ardent desire to explore other crafts pushed her to experiment with different materials. Paradoxically though, she uses her experience gained while making tapestries to weave her new materials. To Frédérique, a deep technical knowhow of the medium she uses is indispensable, however once mastered she strives to go push limits of her knowhow through the innovation of techniques.

Italy  Shining metals, blue Ceramic vessel This blue large-scale ceramic vase with irregular facets was shaped from a plaster mould modelled from a large block of cut polystyrene. The vase has been finished with a special metal mirroring glaze.
Robi Renzi
Ceramicist
Ceramic Vase Métier Story Atelier
Story

Robi Renzi loves the slow pace that his ceramic production requires, sinking his hands in clay and music playing in the background. He loves studying the matter he works with, undertaking thousands of tests and making infinite discoveries, and is always surprised when he opens the kiln. His works blur the border between decorative and functional objects. Robi limits his work to a particular type of vase and this limitation forces him to investigate and explore the subject further.

Atelier

Usually, the model from which the plaster mould is obtained is made with a block of red clay. However, the object is very brittle and heavy and it is difficult to obtain sharp edges which can be damaged during handling. So, Robi makes the model by cutting it directly from a block of polystyrene. Each cut has to be made perfectly as this material cannot be repaired. Porcelain vases are created in the mould then painted with a special blue mirroring glaze and fired at 1010°C.

Métier

Usually, the model from which the plaster mould is obtained is modelled with a block of red clay. However, the object is very brittle and heavy and it is difficult to obtain sharp edges that are damaged during handling. So, Robi makes the model by cutting it directly from a block of polystyrene. Each cut has to be made perfectly as this material cannot be repaired. Porcelain vases are created in the mould then painted with a special blue mirroring glaze and fired at 1010°C

Maison

Contact

Roberto Renzi

Via Giovanni XXIII, 87 36064 Vicenza
+39 329 1231484
info@robirenzi.it
www.robirenzi.it

Contact

Roberto Renzi

Via Giovanni XXIII, 87 36064 Vicenza
+39 329 1231484
info@robirenzi.it
www.robirenzi.it

Métier

Usually, the model from which the plaster mould is obtained is modelled with a block of red clay. However, the object is very brittle and heavy and it is difficult to obtain sharp edges that are damaged during handling. So, Robi makes the model by cutting it directly from a block of polystyrene. Each cut has to be made perfectly as this material cannot be repaired. Porcelain vases are created in the mould then painted with a special blue mirroring glaze and fired at 1010°C

Biography

Robi Renzi

Robi Renzi was born in the Italian region of Marche and currently lives and works in Veneto, Italy. Robi studied at the University of Architecture in Florence. In 1993, he settled in Milan where he founded 'Renzi & Reale' with Roberto Reale, working in the world of interior design. They had a large studio and produced works for fashion and furniture companies and featured in many publications in national and international newspapers. They worked with a number of materials including fabric, wood, resin, metal sheets and casting. Today, Robi dedicates himself to ceramics. He is very interested in applying ceramic-making methods and processes to that of other materials. Each collection is based around a theme, a technique or a material.

Germany  Blue Alchemy (vase nr. 1) Fabric sculpture Blue Alchemy refers to the first man-made pigment that was developed as early as 2600 BCE. Blue Alchemy is the new bright blue edition of Sahabi’s iconic felt vases. With her collection of seven felt vases, entitled Blue Alchemy, Sahabi’s revives ‘Egyptian blue’ and takes us back to an ancient pottery workshop that served as a laboratory for alchemical experiments.
Siba Sahabi
Vase made out of felt Métier Story Atelier
Story

The ancient Egyptians held the colour blue in very high regard because it was considered the colour of life, fertility and rebirth. Since the semiprecious blue stone lapis lazuli was rare and extremely expensive, craftsmen tried to imitate the hue. The discovery of the first synthetic pigment emerged from the production of glazed ceramics because the raw materials (silica, lime, copper, and alkali) were the same. Following its discovery, the use of the synthetic pigment spread throughout Mesopotamia, Greece, and the far reaches of the Roman Empire. ‘Egyptian blue’ had a strong influence on European art and was applied to, amongst others, the wall paintings of Pompeii.

Atelier

Métier

The vase is handmade from coiled coloured felt strips. An enlarged glass tube is placed in the felt vase, allowing it to hold water.

Maison

Contact

Siba Sahabi

Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 Amsterdam
(+31) 614173437
info@sibasahabi.com
www.sibasahabi.com

Contact

Siba Sahabi

Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 Amsterdam
(+31) 614173437
info@sibasahabi.com
www.sibasahabi.com

Métier

The vase is handmade from coiled coloured felt strips. An enlarged glass tube is placed in the felt vase, allowing it to hold water.

Biography

Siba Sahabi

Being the daughter of an Iranian father and German mother, these cultures have had a strong influence on Siba Sahabi’s life and profession. Her work shows how cultures can influence each other and how cross-cultural exchanges can lead to new expressions, focusing on the influence of the Middle East on Europe. Her designs range from centrepieces such as vases to larger objects such as room dividers. Through experimental application of different materials, such as paper, felt and resin, Siba plays with the perception of surfaces and structures. Felt vases are typical of her design, referencing the potter’s wheel, which has its origins in ancient Mesopotamia. Most of her work is handmade and draws on the uniqueness and imperfection inherent to craftsmanship. Her award-winning work has been exhibited internationally in museums and galleries.

Germany  Blue Alchemy (vase nr. 6) Fabric sculpture Blue Alchemy refers to the first man-made pigment that was developed as early as 2600 BCE. Blue Alchemy is the new bright blue edition of Sahabi’s iconic felt vases. With her collection of seven felt vases, entitled Blue Alchemy, Sahabi’s revives ‘Egyptian blue’ and takes us back to an ancient pottery workshop that served as a laboratory for alchemical experiments.
Siba Sahabi
Vase made of felt. Métier Story Atelier
Story

The ancient Egyptians held the colour blue in very high regard because it was considered the colour of life, fertility and rebirth. Since the semiprecious blue stone lapis lazuli was rare and extremely expensive, craftsmen tried to imitate the hue. The discovery of the first synthetic pigment emerged from the production of glazed ceramics because the raw materials (silica, lime, copper, and alkali) were the same. Following its discovery, the use of the synthetic pigment spread throughout Mesopotamia, Greece, and the far reaches of the Roman Empire. ‘Egyptian blue’ had a strong influence on European art and was applied to, amongst others, the wall paintings of Pompeii.

Atelier

Métier

The vase is handmade from coiled coloured felt strips. An enlarged glass tube is placed in the felt vase, allowing it to hold water.

Maison

Contact

Siba Sahabi

Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 Amsterdam
(+31) 614173437
info@sibasahabi.com
www.sibasahabi.com

Contact

Siba Sahabi

Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 Amsterdam
(+31) 614173437
info@sibasahabi.com
www.sibasahabi.com

Métier

The vase is handmade from coiled coloured felt strips. An enlarged glass tube is placed in the felt vase, allowing it to hold water.

Biography

Siba Sahabi

Being the daughter of an Iranian father and German mother, these cultures have had a strong influence on Siba Sahabi’s life and profession. Her work shows how cultures can influence each other and how cross-cultural exchanges can lead to new expressions, focusing on the influence of the Middle East on Europe. Her designs range from centrepieces such as vases to larger objects such as room dividers. Through experimental application of different materials, such as paper, felt and resin, Siba plays with the perception of surfaces and structures. Felt vases are typical of her design, referencing the potter’s wheel, which has its origins in ancient Mesopotamia. Most of her work is handmade and draws on the uniqueness and imperfection inherent to craftsmanship. Her award-winning work has been exhibited internationally in museums and galleries.

Germany  Blue Alchemy (vase nr 7) Fabric sculpture Blue Alchemy refers to the first man-made pigment that was developed as early as 2600 BCE. Blue Alchemy is the new bright blue edition of Sahabi’s iconic felt vases. With her collection of seven felt vases, entitled Blue Alchemy, Sahabi’s revives ‘Egyptian blue’ and takes us back to an ancient pottery workshop that served as a laboratory for alchemical experiments.
Siba Sahabi
Vase made out of felt Métier Story Atelier
Story

The ancient Egyptians held the colour blue in very high regard because it was considered the colour of life, fertility and rebirth. Since the semiprecious blue stone lapis lazuli was rare and extremely expensive, craftsmen tried to imitate the hue. The discovery of the first synthetic pigment emerged from the production of glazed ceramics because the raw materials (silica, lime, copper, and alkali) were the same. Following its discovery, the use of the synthetic pigment spread throughout Mesopotamia, Greece, and the far reaches of the Roman Empire. ‘Egyptian blue’ had a strong influence on European art and was applied to, amongst others, the wall paintings of Pompeii.

Atelier

Métier

The vase is handmade from coiled coloured felt strips. An enlarged glass tube is placed in the felt vase, allowing it to hold water.

Maison

Contact

Siba Sahabi

Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 Amsterdam
(+31) 614173437
info@sibasahabi.com
www.sibasahabi.com

Contact

Siba Sahabi

Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 Amsterdam
(+31) 614173437
info@sibasahabi.com
www.sibasahabi.com

Métier

The vase is handmade from coiled coloured felt strips. An enlarged glass tube is placed in the felt vase, allowing it to hold water.

Biography

Siba Sahabi

Being the daughter of an Iranian father and German mother, these cultures have had a strong influence on Siba Sahabi’s life and profession. Her work shows how cultures can influence each other and how cross-cultural exchanges can lead to new expressions, focusing on the influence of the Middle East on Europe. Her designs range from centrepieces such as vases to larger objects such as room dividers. Through experimental application of different materials, such as paper, felt and resin, Siba plays with the perception of surfaces and structures. Felt vases are typical of her design, referencing the potter’s wheel, which has its origins in ancient Mesopotamia. Most of her work is handmade and draws on the uniqueness and imperfection inherent to craftsmanship. Her award-winning work has been exhibited internationally in museums and galleries.

Austria  The Red One Ceramic vessel This large stoneware bowl was developed from the form of a traditional baking pan with a funnel-like opening. The exterior of the bowl has been finished with a black matte glaze, and the interior with an ox blood glaze.
Thomas Bohle
Ceramicist
Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

The bowl is turned from a single piece of 50kg clay. The particular challenge with this cantilevered form and size is the static; that is the retention of the form during the firing process.

Maison

Contact

Thomas Bohle

Färbergasse 2, 6850 Dornbirn Dornbirn
+43 650 7031958
atelier@thomasbohle.com
www.thomasbohle.com

Contact

Thomas Bohle

Färbergasse 2, 6850 Dornbirn Dornbirn
+43 650 7031958
atelier@thomasbohle.com
www.thomasbohle.com

Métier

The bowl is turned from a single piece of 50kg clay. The particular challenge with this cantilevered form and size is the static; that is the retention of the form during the firing process.

Biography

Thomas Bohle

Thomas Bohle was born in 1958 in Dornbirn, Austria. While in England at the age of 26, Thomas sat down at a potter’s wheel for the first time. This contact with clay and the process of creating using his hands moved him, marking the beginning of an artistic career dedicated to ceramics. He experimented and researched traditional forms and surfaces and built a rich foundation for working with ceramics. He completed a pottery apprenticeship in 1987 and subsequently opened his own atelier in Dornbirn. Little by little, he developed a recognisable style and gained recognition from fellow artists as well as the art world. In 2002, Thomas embarked on a study trip to Japan followed by exhibitions in Shanghai and Tokyo. In 2006, Thomas was awarded the Bavarian State Prize.

Italy  Bloom Candle holders Bloom is a twelve-candle candelabrum entirely made by hand from blown borosilicate glass. The classically shaped base of the candelabrum morphs into a tree trunk with pink blossoming flowers at the tip of its branches.
Simone Crestani
Glass work
Borosilicate glass-blown candelabra Métier Story Atelier
Story

Simone Crestani takes his inspiration from natural forms, which much like his mastering of glassworking techniques, exemplify equilibrium and imperfect elegance. His work starts outside of the studio, when contemplating the beauty and poetry of natural forms found throughout the countryside. Through his sculptural glass works, Simone aims to recreate an equilibrium found in nature by integrating his research with contemporary design. He then gives life to his thoughts through glass.

Atelier

Métier

Simone gently blows through a small hand held rubber tube to expand torch-heated glass, shaping it with tongs and fusing different pieces and shapes together.

Maison

Contact

Atelier Crestani di Simone Crestani

Via Boschi 36/A 36043 Camisano Vicentino
+39 3932399458
info@simonecrestani.com
www.simonecrestani.com/

Contact

Atelier Crestani di Simone Crestani

Via Boschi 36/A 36043 Camisano Vicentino
+39 3932399458
info@simonecrestani.com
www.simonecrestani.com/

Métier

Simone gently blows through a small hand held rubber tube to expand torch-heated glass, shaping it with tongs and fusing different pieces and shapes together.

Biography

Simone Crestani

Simone Crestani started working glass at the age of 15. After a ten-year apprenticeship in Lunardon’s factory, he opened his own studio. An introspective and self-taught artisan, Simone has over the years combined lessons learnt and experiences gained to push glassworking beyond traditional boundaries. Simone goes beyond traditional techniques and overcomes limits of shapes and dimensions of hollow spaces. He works glass in a technique that he calls Hollow Sculpture, which allows him to create large-scale pieces without neglecting the smallest detail. Simone combines design and artisanship to produce innovative and exclusive sculptural pieces. Simone’s innovative glassworking techniques are recognised and appreciated around the world.

Italy  Mormorio del tempo (Murmur of time) Metal sculpture A pair of enamel shells in copper and 24k gold. The combination of enamel and copper creates the illusion of mother of pearl.
Gabriella Gabrini
Metal enamel
Enamel on copper shells Métier Story Atelier
Story

The foundation of every one of Gabriella Gabrini’s creations is born from an idea. No work can be started if an elaborate design and planning has not been undertaken first. The design will determine the shape, size and patterns of the work as well as the colour palette and relation of the enamel work. Different shades of colour influence the way in which the viewer will experience the work. Then the material creation of the work commences. Given that this is enamel on metal, a variety of metals such as copper, iron, gold, silver and stainless steel can be used. These are shaped using such techniques as hammering, embossing and chiselling. The finished object is subjected to a first firing to burn fat and impurities. Then it is pickled, by being immersed in a solution of sulfuric acid that completely cleans the surface. Now the enamelling can begin.

Atelier

Métier

Gabriella Gabrini uses a particular technique and a process of melting in an oven heated to 950°C that adds a vitreous paste composed of siliceous, alkali and metal oxides to metal surfaces such as copper, iron, silver and gold, creating a unique combination of light and transparency.

Maison

Contact

Gabriella Gabrini

Riviera San Benedetto 134 15138 Padova
+39 348 225 7212
gabriella.gabrini@gmail.com

Contact

Gabriella Gabrini

Riviera San Benedetto 134 15138 Padova
+39 348 225 7212
gabriella.gabrini@gmail.com

Métier

Gabriella Gabrini uses a particular technique and a process of melting in an oven heated to 950°C that adds a vitreous paste composed of siliceous, alkali and metal oxides to metal surfaces such as copper, iron, silver and gold, creating a unique combination of light and transparency.

Biography

Gabriella Gabrini

Gabriella Gabrini is a skilled enamel artisan who lives and works in the Northern Italian city of Padua. She graduated as a ceramist from the School of Art and the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice. After working in the studios of Medandri, Melotti and Fornasetti she started to work in Paolo De Poli’s workshop, to whom we owe the recovery of this particular ancient Italian art of enamel. She worked in his studio for 20 years. Since then, Gabriella has kept working with this technique and has continued to study and perfect it through her complicated and detailed works. She has since opened her own studio. In 2000 she was named Officer of Merit of the Italian Republic by the then President of the Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, for her commitment and dedication to artistic craftsmanship.

Italy  Presepe in Corallo (Crib in Coral)
courtesy of: Enzo Liverino SRL
Shell sculpture This nativity scene made from several species of coral is a reproduction of a Neapolitan 18th century crib. The scenography of the crib as well as the characters are entirely made of coral. Small cards are used to form a single mosaic that covers the whole work.
Enzo Liverino
Coral sculpture
Nativity scene made from several species of coral. Métier Story Atelier
Story

Over the centuries, Liverino has been evolving, renewing and growing, ensuring the perpetuation of innovation and a continuous drive forwards. The story of Liverino is one of rich artisanal tradition, of artisan’s voices, machines and instruments. This rich history lives on through the company’s knowledge of techniques of coral processing passed down from generation to generation of skilful artisans.

Atelier

Enzo Liverino’s company transforms raw coral into finished and semi-finished artistic works. Vincenzo (Enzo) and his two sons Basilio and Andrea currently manage the company. They have always remained faithful to the tradition and dexterity of the craft while striving to invest in innovation. The company transforms raw coral into finished or semi-finished works, which are then put into the skillful hands of artisans in companies such as Bulgari, Gucci and others. Each piece produced by Liverino is unique, thanks to the great skill of the passionate artisans who for over a century have dedicated themselves with the same passion and attention to the processing of the most precious coral. To start with, raw coral is chosen, washed, and studied to decide the use based on its shape. The coral is then cut and divided by size, colour and quality. It can be rounded, perforated to be threaded or engraved with a burin, according to the carver's imagination. Given the extreme rarity of the material, each operation is carried out with great respect to nature. In order to not impoverish the reproduction and growth of the species, only the largest coral branches are collected by the divers during the fishing phase.

Métier

To start with, raw coral is chosen, washed and studied to decide the use based on its shape. The coral is then cut and divided by size, colour and quality. It can be rounded, perforated to be threaded or engraved with a burin, according to the carver's imagination. Given the extreme rarity of the material, each operation is carried out with respect for nature and, in order not to impoverish the reproduction and growth of the species, only the largest branches are collected by the divers during the fishing phase.

Maison

Enzo Liverino’s company transforms raw coral into finished and semi-finished artistic works. Vincenzo (Enzo) and his two sons Basilio and Andrea currently manage the company. They have always remained faithful to the tradition and dexterity of the craft while striving to invest in innovation. The company transforms raw coral into finished or semi-finished works, which are then put into the skillful hands of artisans in companies such as Bulgari, Gucci and others. Each piece produced by Liverino is unique, thanks to the great skill of the passionate artisans who for over a century have dedicated themselves with the same passion and attention to the processing of the most precious coral.

Contact

Enzo Liverino S.r.l.

Via Montedoro 61 80059 Torre del Greco (NA)
+39 081 8811225
info@liverino1894.com
www.liverino1894.com

Contact

Enzo Liverino S.r.l.

Via Montedoro 61 80059 Torre del Greco (NA)
+39 081 8811225
info@liverino1894.com
www.liverino1894.com

Métier

To start with, raw coral is chosen, washed and studied to decide the use based on its shape. The coral is then cut and divided by size, colour and quality. It can be rounded, perforated to be threaded or engraved with a burin, according to the carver's imagination. Given the extreme rarity of the material, each operation is carried out with respect for nature and, in order not to impoverish the reproduction and growth of the species, only the largest branches are collected by the divers during the fishing phase.

Biography

Enzo Liverino

Heir to a family tradition and shop founded in 1894, Vincenzo (Enzo) Liverino has kept a precious coral crafting tradition alive. Enzo combines his artisanal expertise with entrepreneurial skills. He was the only Italian at the first world coral convention (Kochi, 1993) and Enzo spent ten years travelling between Naples and Taiwan. It was at this time that he refined the selection criteria for the raw material. Enzo introduced the manufacture of cameos and initiated the importation of Asian coral from Japan and started to export products to foreign countries.

Germany  Lidded Vessel Glass vessel This fused glass vase resembles the surface of honeycomb, and the yellow-red pattern on top of the vase, honey.
Gabriele Küstner
Glass fusing
Fused glass vase Métier Story Atelier
Story

From her childhood, glass and colour have always captured Gabriele Küstner’s interest. Working with her hands and creating something were also her main interests when growing up. A few years after Gabriele finished her education, her aunt told her that her ancestors (from her mother’s side) had been glassblowers on the island of Murano. They migrated later to the Baltic and took on different professions. Gabriele is the first in that line to work again with glass and typically in a very Italian style.

Atelier

Métier

Painted glass canes of different diameters are cut into segments. They are then fused together. The surface is treated with diamond and stone wheels.

Maison

Contact

Gabriele Küstner

Gotmarstrasse 1 37073 Göttingen
+49 551 48 63 42
G.Kuestner@t-online.de
www.gabriele-kuestner.com

Contact

Gabriele Küstner

Gotmarstrasse 1 37073 Göttingen
+49 551 48 63 42
G.Kuestner@t-online.de
www.gabriele-kuestner.com

Métier

Painted glass canes of different diameters are cut into segments. They are then fused together. The surface is treated with diamond and stone wheels.

Biography

Gabriele Küstner

Gabriele Küstner works with fused glass mosaics, a process used by the Romans around 300 BC. Her teacher at the Staatliche Glasfachschule Hadamar, Josef Welzel, introduced her to the process. Following three years of studies as a glass grinder, Gabriele spent one year in Tennessee, at the Appalachian Center for Crafts. Here, she had access to glass blowing facilities and started to work on her technique of pulling glass cane. Upon returning to Germany in the mid-80s, Gabriele opened her own studio. She took a fusing class a few years later that introduced her to the possibilities of using china paint to colour glass rods from the outside. She worked on perfecting this process over the years aiming to render the fusing process visible. Her designs are inspired by the honeycomb pattern found in nature.

Germany  Mosaic Plate Glass vessel This dark coloured glass plate has been made by fusing different diametre glass rods together, creating a honeycomb design on the surface of the plate.
Gabriele Küstner
Glass fusing
Fused glass plate Métier Story Atelier
Story

From her childhood, glass and colour have always captured Gabriele Küstner’s interest. Working with her hands and creating something were also her main interests when growing up. A few years after Gabriele finished her education, her aunt told her that her ancestors (from her mother’s side) had been glassblowers on the island of Murano. They migrated later to the Baltic and took on different professions. Gabriele is the first in that line to work again with glass and typically in a very Italian style.

Atelier

Métier

Painted glass canes of different diameters are cut into segments. They are then fused together. The surface is treated with diamond and stone wheels.

Maison

Contact

Gabriele Küstner

Gotmarstrasse 1 37073 Göttingen
+49 551 48 63 42
G.Kuestner@t-online.de
www.gabriele-kuestner.com

Contact

Gabriele Küstner

Gotmarstrasse 1 37073 Göttingen
+49 551 48 63 42
G.Kuestner@t-online.de
www.gabriele-kuestner.com

Métier

Painted glass canes of different diameters are cut into segments. They are then fused together. The surface is treated with diamond and stone wheels.

Biography

Gabriele Küstner

Gabriele Küstner works with fused glass mosaics, a process used by the Romans around 300 BC. Her teacher at the Staatliche Glasfachschule Hadamar, Josef Welzel, introduced her to the process. Following three years of studies as a glass grinder, Gabriele spent one year in Tennessee, at the Appalachian Center for Crafts. Here, she had access to glass blowing facilities and started to work on her technique of pulling glass cane. Upon returning to Germany in the mid-80s, Gabriele opened her own studio. She took a fusing class a few years later that introduced her to the possibilities of using china paint to colour glass rods from the outside. She worked on perfecting this process over the years aiming to render the fusing process visible. Her designs are inspired by the honeycomb pattern found in nature.

Belgium  Ellerbeckia (silver bowl with holes) Metal vessel This silver bowl has been shaped by hand. Once the initial shape is created, Helena Schepens pierces and drills the bowl, removing pieces of material to create numerous patterns of openings. To Helena, the shadows created by the cut-out shapes bring the form to life and blur the distinction between shape and shadow.
Helena Schepens
Silversmith
Silver bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

Helena Schepens plays with shadows to produce surprising works with a poetic quality. Through her vessels, she creates refined patterns of openings that create an effect of light and shadow on the surface beneath. Natural forms of growth are often the starting point for Helena’s creations. Her structures reveal an image and shadow on the wall or on the surface surrounding it. Through her work Helena is attempting to emphasise the fundamental connection between two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts. Shadow and light, emptiness and fullness, to-be or not to-be, body and soul. Her works thus search to create a balance between two opposite poles.

Atelier

Métier

Starting from a flat sheet of metal, an object is shaped by hand. Patterns are then cut and drilled out from the object, creating designs inspired by nature.

Maison

Contact

Helena Schepens

Antwerp
+32 499 62 58 98
info@helenaschepens.com
www.helenaschepens.com

Contact

Helena Schepens

Antwerp
+32 499 62 58 98
info@helenaschepens.com
www.helenaschepens.com

Métier

Starting from a flat sheet of metal, an object is shaped by hand. Patterns are then cut and drilled out from the object, creating designs inspired by nature.

Biography

Helena Schepens

Helena Schepens’ work contrasts a combination of concepts and artisanship. As a silversmith, she very much enjoys the process of raising three-dimensional volume from flat metal sheets, feeling the form develop in her hands. Helena studied Jewellery & Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (BA & MA, 2000-2004) and at the Royal College of Art in London (MA, 2004-2006). In 2007, she created her own studio in Antwerp. Her vessels create a refined pattern of openings producing an effect of light and shadow on the surface. She often derives the themes of her work from nature, such as the microscopic organisms that live in water, called diatoms. Their beautiful patterns became an endless source of inspiration for her silverwork.

Belgium  Tricotado I (steel wire), Metal vessel This steel wire bowl has been hand crocheted and hammered by hand. To Helena, the shadows created by empty spaces bring the form to life and blur the distinction between shape and shadow.
Helena Schepens
Silversmith
Hand crocheted and hammered steel wire vessel. Métier Story Atelier
Story

Helena Schepens plays with shadows to produce surprising works with a poetic quality. Through her vessels, she creates refined patterns of openings that create an effect of light and shadow on the surface beneath. Natural forms of growth are often the starting point for Helena’s creations. Her structures reveal an image and shadow on the wall or on the surface surrounding it. Through her work Helena is attempting to emphasise the fundamental connection between two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts. Shadow and light, emptiness and fullness, to-be or not to-be, body and soul. Her works thus search to create a balance between two opposite poles.

Atelier

Métier

Starting from a flat sheet of metal, an object is shaped by hand. Patterns are then cut and drilled out from the object, creating designs inspired by nature.

Maison

Contact

Helena Schepens

Antwerp
+32 499 62 58 98
info@helenaschepens.com
www.helenaschepens.com

Contact

Helena Schepens

Antwerp
+32 499 62 58 98
info@helenaschepens.com
www.helenaschepens.com

Métier

Starting from a flat sheet of metal, an object is shaped by hand. Patterns are then cut and drilled out from the object, creating designs inspired by nature.

Biography

Helena Schepens

Helena Schepens’ work contrasts a combination of concepts and artisanship. As a silversmith, she very much enjoys the process of raising three-dimensional volume from flat metal sheets, feeling the form develop in her hands. Helena studied Jewellery & Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (BA & MA, 2000-2004) and at the Royal College of Art in London (MA, 2004-2006). In 2007, she created her own studio in Antwerp. Her vessels create a refined pattern of openings producing an effect of light and shadow on the surface. She often derives the themes of her work from nature, such as the microscopic organisms that live in water, called diatoms. Their beautiful patterns became an endless source of inspiration for her silverwork.

Belgium  Tricotado II (silver wire) Metal vessel This fine silver wire bowl has been crocheted and hammered by hand. To Helena, the shadows created by empty spaces bring the form to life and blur the distinction between shape and shadow.
Helena Schepens
Silversmith
Hand crocheted and hammered silver wire vessel. Métier Story Atelier
Story

Helena Schepens plays with shadows to produce surprising works with a poetic quality. Through her vessels, she creates refined patterns of openings that create an effect of light and shadow on the surface beneath. Natural forms of growth are often the starting point for Helena’s creations. Her structures reveal an image and shadow on the wall or on the surface surrounding it. Through her work Helena is attempting to emphasise the fundamental connection between two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts. Shadow and light, emptiness and fullness, to-be or not to-be, body and soul. Her works thus search to create a balance between two opposite poles.

Atelier

Métier

Starting from a flat sheet of metal, an object is shaped by hand. Patterns are then cut and drilled out from the object, creating designs inspired by nature.

Maison

Contact

Helena Schepens

Antwerp
+32 499 62 58 98
info@helenaschepens.com
www.helenaschepens.com

Contact

Helena Schepens

Antwerp
+32 499 62 58 98
info@helenaschepens.com
www.helenaschepens.com

Métier

Starting from a flat sheet of metal, an object is shaped by hand. Patterns are then cut and drilled out from the object, creating designs inspired by nature.

Biography

Helena Schepens

Helena Schepens’ work contrasts a combination of concepts and artisanship. As a silversmith, she very much enjoys the process of raising three-dimensional volume from flat metal sheets, feeling the form develop in her hands. Helena studied Jewellery & Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (BA & MA, 2000-2004) and at the Royal College of Art in London (MA, 2004-2006). In 2007, she created her own studio in Antwerp. Her vessels create a refined pattern of openings producing an effect of light and shadow on the surface. She often derives the themes of her work from nature, such as the microscopic organisms that live in water, called diatoms. Their beautiful patterns became an endless source of inspiration for her silverwork.

Ireland  Entwined Ceramic sculpture This sculpture is made from hand-formed feather-like pieces of bone china that have been sewn onto tulle to create a larger sculptural piece.
Jennifer Hickey
Ceramicist
Sewn pieces of bone china Métier Story Atelier
Story

Jennifer Hickey is drawn to the beauty and subtlety of the natural world. Themes of fragility, ephemerality and translucency are central to her work. It is the rituals of making, the physical rhythms, the process and time involved that are the central aspects of her practice. The natural, ethereal properties of her primary materials, porcelain and bone china, demand particular discipline and a delicacy that is a necessary component of the finished pieces.

Atelier

Métier

Jennifer makes hundreds of petal like ceramic pieces that are then stitched with translucent thread to form her sculpture. The slowness and repetition of her process are essential components of the finished pieces.

Maison

Contact

Jennifer Hickey

Dublin
Jennynihici@hotmail.com
www.jenniferhickey.com

Contact

Jennifer Hickey

Dublin
Jennynihici@hotmail.com
www.jenniferhickey.com

Métier

Jennifer makes hundreds of petal like ceramic pieces that are then stitched with translucent thread to form her sculpture. The slowness and repetition of her process are essential components of the finished pieces.

Biography

Jennifer Hickey

Jennifer Hickey is a ceramic artist based in Ireland. She studied ceramics at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin, and has been working primarily with porcelain and bone china for a number of years. She works from a small garden studio in her Dublin home that is a constant source of inspiration. Jennifer has exhibited nationally and internationally. Her work is included in the National Museum of Ireland Collection, The State Art Collection of Ireland, and in numerous public and private collections.

Switzerland  Terre I & Terre II & Terre III & Terre IV & Terre X Wood sculpture Using the rotation of a wood lathe, Jérôme Blanc reproduces free and random lines like an abstract drawing. Creating new movements with his tools, the wood takes on the appearance of a new material, similar to ceramic, that one might have modelled. The objects are purely decorative.
Jérôme Blanc
Wood turning
Turned wood sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Jérôme’s inspiration came from a friend who drew him an abstract form in pencil made of fast and random lines in which he found new forms of inspiration. Jérôme wanted to use this creative principle with sculpture. What pleases him with this work is the illusion of matter and its physical limit. Emptiness then enhances the fullness and the wood takes the form of earth.

Atelier

Métier

Jérôme Blanc cuts pieces of green wood weighing a few kilos. He finds the moist wood easier to work with. He works the wood extensively on a lathe before it reaches its final form. Hours are spent hollowing out the pieces, eventually revealing sculptural shapes weighing only a few ounces.

Maison

Contact

Jérôme Blanc

5, Simon-Durand 1227 Carouge
+41 788455001
jb@jeromeblanc.ch
www.jeromeblanc.ch

Contact

Jérôme Blanc

5, Simon-Durand 1227 Carouge
+41 788455001
jb@jeromeblanc.ch
www.jeromeblanc.ch

Métier

Jérôme Blanc cuts pieces of green wood weighing a few kilos. He finds the moist wood easier to work with. He works the wood extensively on a lathe before it reaches its final form. Hours are spent hollowing out the pieces, eventually revealing sculptural shapes weighing only a few ounces.

Biography

Jérôme Blanc

Jérôme Blanc was born and grew up in Geneva, Switzerland. He studied woodworking and cabinetmaking for five years at the School of Arts and Crafts in Geneva, but it was not until a trip to Australia that he was introduced to woodturning. This encounter enticed him closer to woodwork. He trained as a woodturner in Australia and opened a woodworking, sculpture and woodturning business when he returned to Geneva. In his approach, Jérôme Blanc truly belongs to his time. A time concerned with ecology that in Jérôme’s opinion could benefit from a return to simplicity. The contemporary environmental issues that preoccupy the sculptor are reflected in his creations. Fundamentally, Jérôme creates pure and simple shapes made from wood, a natural element that comes from the earth and can return to the earth.

France  Jewellery Cabinet Slender
courtesy of: Atelier Ludwig & Dominique
Furniture A handmade jewellery cabinet is held up by four slender legs. The cabinet has been covered with galuchat (stingray).
Ludwig Vogelgesang
Cabinetmaker
Jewellery cabinet Métier Story Atelier
Story

Ludwig Vogelgesang takes inspiration from the very materials he works with. His creative drive is born from his emotional response to the materials that form the essence of his work, as much materially as conceptually. He continuously seeks to understand the material, since no two pieces of wood are the same. In order to be faithful to the unique nature of the objects he creates, Ludwig immerses himself in the story of the object in order to bring out the most fitting colours, tonalities and shades.

Atelier

Ludwig & Dominique have focused on the aesthetics and refinement of Art Deco since the early 1970s, at a time when the style was still arcane and accessible only to an elite group of connoisseurs. Established in Paris in 1980, and driven by a passion for the arts, Ludwig & Dominique restore high quality furniture for the most esteemed decorators, art galleries, museums, collectors and auction houses.

Métier

This jewellery cabinet has been made using traditional cabinetmaking tools and techniques.

Maison

Ludwig & Dominique have focused on the aesthetics and refinement of Art Deco since the early 1970s, at a time when the style was still arcane and accessible only to an elite group of connoisseurs. Established in Paris in 1980, and driven by a passion for the arts, Ludwig & Dominique restore high quality furniture for the most esteemed decorators, art galleries, museums, collectors and auction houses.

Contact

Ludwig & Dominique

2ter passage Ramey 75018 Paris
+33 1 42 59 81 15
contact@ludwigetdominique.com
www.ludwigetdominique.com

Contact

Ludwig & Dominique

2ter passage Ramey 75018 Paris
+33 1 42 59 81 15
contact@ludwigetdominique.com
www.ludwigetdominique.com

Métier

This jewellery cabinet has been made using traditional cabinetmaking tools and techniques.

Biography

Ludwig Vogelgesang

Cabinet-maker Ludwig Vogelgesang draws his inspiration from the raw materials he uses. It triggers the emotion, the desire and the drive to create. Wood is the essence of his work. Every day through his work, he learns more about the power of nature and its nobility. Ludwig is precise in his movements, having repeated them over and over again his gestures are accurate, observed and have been repeated countless times, pursing the most adequate and mastered technique. This experience permits him to work wood and furniture in a controlled manner that remains natural. Ludwig is an internationally recognised artisan who has received numerous awards for the quality of his creative work and restoration of furniture. The French Minister awarded Ludwig the distinction of «Master of Art» in 2010 for Culture and Communication.

Italy  Tavolo con vaso e mazzo di fiori Ceramic vessel Bertozzi & Casoni, "Tavolo con vaso e mazzo di fiori", 2010, polychrome ceramic, bronze and polished cast aluminium. 132cm high, 60cm diameter.
Bertozzi & Casoni
Ceramicist
Classically shaped polychrome ceramic vase Métier Story Atelier
Story

This classically shaped polychrome ceramic vase is placed on top of a table with a polished aluminium base and a ceramic top. The vase holds a bouquet of flowers with bronze stems and scarabs.

Atelier

Giampaolo Bertozzi and Stefano Dal Monte Casoni founded Bertozzi & Casoni in 1980 in Imola, Italy. From their early studies at the Ceramic Art Institute of Faenza, their interests gravitated towards experimenting with sculpture, seeing in ceramics the possibility of painted sculpture. For almost two decades, they worked on creating innovative designs employing traditional methods of production such as majolica. Towards the end the 80s and the start of the 90s, they started to experiment with materials driven from industry. Following their “Scegli il Paradiso” project in 1997, that reached dimensional and creative heights not earlier achieved, Bertozzi & Casoni would from then on almost only use materials driven from industry.

Métier

Polychrome ceramics are created by using three or more coloured slips to decorate the handmade ceramic.

Maison

Giampaolo Bertozzi and Stefano Dal Monte Casoni founded Bertozzi & Casoni in 1980 in Imola, Italy. From their early studies at the Ceramic Art Institute of Faenza, their interests gravitated towards experimenting with sculpture, seeing in ceramics the possibility of painted sculpture. For almost two decades, they worked on creating innovative designs employing traditional methods of production such as majolica. Towards the end the 80s and the start of the 90s, they started to experiment with materials driven from industry. Following their “Scegli il Paradiso” project in 1997, that reached dimensional and creative heights not earlier achieved, Bertozzi & Casoni would from then on almost only use materials driven from industry.

Contact

Bertozzi & Casoni S.r.l.

via Colombarotto 28 40026 Imola
+39 0542 640136
info@bertozziecasoni.it
www.bertozziecasoni.it

Contact

Bertozzi & Casoni S.r.l.

via Colombarotto 28 40026 Imola
+39 0542 640136
info@bertozziecasoni.it
www.bertozziecasoni.it

Métier

Polychrome ceramics are created by using three or more coloured slips to decorate the handmade ceramic.

Biography

Bertozzi & Casoni

Giampaolo Bertozzi and Stefano Dal Monte Casoni founded Bertozzi & Casoni in 1980 in Imola, Italy. From their early studies at the Ceramic Art Institute of Faenza, their interests gravitated towards experimenting with sculpture, seeing in ceramics the possibility of painted sculpture. For almost two decades, they worked on creating innovative designs employing traditional methods of production such as majolica. Towards the end the 80s and the start of the 90s, they started to experiment with materials driven from industry. Following their “Scegli il Paradiso” project in 1997, that reached dimensional and creative heights not earlier achieved, Bertozzi & Casoni would from then on almost only use materials driven from industry.

Netherlands  Flowers for Weesp Fabric sculpture This enormous handmade flower bouquet with a steel base with primroses, tulips, wild roses and hyacinths was inspired by flowers decorating the ceramics on display in the museum in Weesp's town hall.
Linda Nieuwstad
Fabric sculptor
Enormous handmade flower bouquet. Métier Story Atelier
Story

On a cold December day, Linda Nieuwstad took a train and went to visit a small town called Weesp near Amsterdam. Upon arriving, she walked through the town and eventually wandered into the city hall that also houses a ceramics museum on its second floor. In this collection of works ranging from 1760 to 1770, Linda could see tulips, pansies, primroses, roses, cornflowers, daffodils and many other varieties of flowers decorating ancient porcelain plates. She took a number of notes and photos and then had to leave to catch her train. A few months later, she decided to make a bouquet based on this experience. When the bouquet was finished, Linda returned to Weesp and brought her bouquet with her. A friendly man at the reception of the City Hall allowed her to take some pictures of her bouquet in the hall.

Atelier

Métier

Linda bends her steel frames by hand then welds the separate parts together. Linda then cuts leaves and petals out of truck tarp and gives them a final touch with details in wool, velvet or paper. Her flowers are 100% handmade and that is why they look alive.

Maison

Contact

Linda Nieuwstad

de Wingerd 2 3951 XK Maarn
+31 633642718
info@lindanieuwstad.nl
lindanieuwstad.nl

Contact

Linda Nieuwstad

de Wingerd 2 3951 XK Maarn
+31 633642718
info@lindanieuwstad.nl
lindanieuwstad.nl

Métier

Linda bends her steel frames by hand then welds the separate parts together. Linda then cuts leaves and petals out of truck tarp and gives them a final touch with details in wool, velvet or paper. Her flowers are 100% handmade and that is why they look alive.

Biography

Linda Nieuwstad

Linda Nieuwstad’s flowers are larger than life. Her forget-me-nots are as large as breakfast plates, her roses can measure the size of truck tires and you can sit underneath her daffodils. She started to make large sized flowers when she visited an old museum in the Netherlands full of flower paintings from the 18th century. She dreamed of living inside the paintings, and she has been making large sized flowers ever since. Over the past few years, Linda has built up a reputation as a creator of luxurious floral still-lifes made of explicitly industrial materials such as plastic, textile, foam rubber, PVS and steel. To Linda, the underlying symbolism of the individual flowers is of less importance than the general significance of a bouquet as a gesture of pleasure or sympathy.

Netherlands  Gilded leather room divider, with the pattern of the five senses 1640 Furniture This gilded leather room divider is made with an aluminium frame made by Gardelux and designed by Edward van Vliet. The leather frame has been gilded with the pattern of the five senses, like those represented in the work of Maarten van de Heuvel in 1640.
Sebastiaan van Soest
Leather gilding
Gilded leather room divider Métier Story Atelier
Story

Contrary to what one could assume given its name, gilded leather is not worked with gold leaf but rather with layers of silver leaf. In order for the silver not to oxidise, layers of varnish are applied, lending it its final golden colour. This delicate and meticulous technique of decorating leather dates back to the 6th century. Gilded leather can be applied to numerous objects such as bags, chairs and screens. A bag alone can take more than 50 hours of work to complete. Sebastiaan van Soest’s aim is to preserve the gilded leather craft as well as to restore gilded leather pieces.

Atelier

Métier

This leather has been gilded with silver leaf, and then lacquered with a golden yellow varnish. A mould is used to emboss the gilded leather that is then painted by hand. Based on industry standards, only water based paints and varnishes are used to decorate the leather.

Maison

Contact

Goudleer-atelier Van Soest

Fruitlaan 24, 2292 BB Wateringen
+31 610 610 174
info@goudleermakers.nl
www.goudleer.com

Contact

Goudleer-atelier Van Soest

Fruitlaan 24, 2292 BB Wateringen
+31 610 610 174
info@goudleermakers.nl
www.goudleer.com

Métier

This leather has been gilded with silver leaf, and then lacquered with a golden yellow varnish. A mould is used to emboss the gilded leather that is then painted by hand. Based on industry standards, only water based paints and varnishes are used to decorate the leather.

Biography

Sebastiaan van Soest

Sebastiaan van Soest is the last gilded leather-worker in the Netherlands. The craft was transmitted from father to son and Sebastiaan literally grew up among gilded leather. Wherever his parents went to work, they would take Sebastiaan and his sister along. In the 90s, the workshop created a gilded leather room for a replica of Huis ten Bosch at the Holland Village in Japan. That was the first time that Sebastiaan would participate in manufacturing gilded leather. A few years after his father passed away, Sebastiaan dedicated himself to this craft, wishing to preserve the unique knowhow handed down by his parents. He is the owner and manager of Goudleeratelier Van Soest. Sebastiaan’s mission is to breathe new life into gilded leather and give it a modern look and application.

France  Diabolo 41 (natural color) and Diabolo 43 Wood sculpture These sculptures have been turned, hollowed and sandblasted from a solid block of oak to a quasi-transparent degree similar to the texture of lace fabric.
Pascal Oudet
Wood turning
Turned wood sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Pascal Oudet’s works invite the viewer to explore the history of the tree from which the wood originated. The history of the sometimes centuries-old trees can be traced through the fluctuating width of the grain that has become even more apparent after Pascal’s treatment of the wood. Each piece is as unique in its creation as in its natural history.

Atelier

Métier

A trunk of oak is turned on a lathe until it is very thin then sandblasted until the wood resembles lace fabric. The black/grey piece has been ebonised through a natural reaction with wood tannins that preserve the natural contrasting colour between heartwood and sapwood, which react differently, thus leading to black or grey. Both pieces are left as natural as possible, with just a protective finish.

Maison

Contact

Pascal Oudet

21 rue du Moulin 38570 Goncelin
+33 4 76 13 26 20
pascal.oudet@laposte.net
www.lavieenbois.com

Contact

Pascal Oudet

21 rue du Moulin 38570 Goncelin
+33 4 76 13 26 20
pascal.oudet@laposte.net
www.lavieenbois.com

Métier

A trunk of oak is turned on a lathe until it is very thin then sandblasted until the wood resembles lace fabric. The black/grey piece has been ebonised through a natural reaction with wood tannins that preserve the natural contrasting colour between heartwood and sapwood, which react differently, thus leading to black or grey. Both pieces are left as natural as possible, with just a protective finish.

Biography

Pascal Oudet

Formerly an electrical engineer, Pascal Oudet changed career path towards one of wood-turning about ten years ago. Pascal perfected a technique of sandblasting turned wood to a quasi-transparent degree, similar to the texture of lace fabric. He has been practising this technique for about twelve years but it took him around half of this time to perfect it. He is currently still the only artisan to master this technique in France. Pascal is the president of l’Association Française des Tourneurs d’Art sur Bois (French Association of Art Wood Turners) (AFTAB). Pascal’s works have received national and international recognition and have been exhibited internationally. In 2012, he obtained the Grand Prix de la Création de la Ville de Paris.

Belgium  Pearlinder #3 a, Pearlinder #3 b Metal vessel A white vase with a granulated surface stands next to a black one. Through his series of hammered vases decorated with silver granulation, Pearlinder #3, David Huycke explores the decorative features of granulation, in contrast to his previous works that used this technique mainly as a constructive feature.
David Huycke
Silversmith
Hammered vases decorated with silver granulation Métier Story Atelier
Story

Rethinking granulation was an integral part of David Huycke's doctoral work and thesis, “The metamorphic ornament – Rethinking granulation”. David investigated the possibilities of transforming an old goldsmithing technique, granulation, into sculptural silverware. This ancient technique usually used for jewellery work creates small metal balls to decorate surfaces of objects. David investigated how rather than using this technique to decorate the surface of his sculptures, it could become the actual surface of the sculpture. Granulation thus became the subject of his sculptures and inspiration for new ones.

Atelier

The objects are decorated with silver spheres using the technique of granulation. Granulation is a decorative technique in goldsmith art where little spheres (granules) decorate a surface.

Métier

The objects are decorated with silver spheres using the technique of granulation. Granulation is a decorative technique in goldsmith art where little spheres (granules) decorate a surface.

Maison

Contact

David Huycke

www.davidhuycke.com

Contact

David Huycke

www.davidhuycke.com

Métier

The objects are decorated with silver spheres using the technique of granulation. Granulation is a decorative technique in goldsmith art where little spheres (granules) decorate a surface.

Biography

David Huycke

David Huycke is a Belgian silversmith artisan and professor at PXL-MAD School of Arts and at Hasselt University. He studied jewellery design and silversmith work at the Saint-Lucas School of Arts in Antwerp. Since 1993, David has worked as an independent artisan in the field of the sculptural art-objects. In 2010, he finished his PhD in Arts with the project, “The Metamorphic Ornament: Re-Thinking Granulation, a practice-based research on the contemporary artistic relevance of the ancient technique of granulation”. David’s current research focuses on the meaning of material-surface in the contemporary silver object. His work is shown in galleries and museums worldwide and features in permanent collections such as in the Design Museum in Ghent, the Röhsska Museum in Gothenburg, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the V&A in London and others.

Belgium  Kissing Pearlinder Metal vessel A white vase with a granulated surface stands next to a black one. Through Kissing Pearlinder, David Huycke explores the decorative features of granulation, in contrast to his previous works, which used this technique mainly as a constructive feature.
David Huycke
Silversmith
Hammered vases decorated with silver granulation Métier Story Atelier
Story

Rethinking granulation was an integral part of David Huycke's doctoral work and thesis, “The metamorphic ornament – Rethinking granulation”. David investigated the possibilities of transforming an old goldsmithing technique, granulation, into sculptural silverware. This ancient technique usually used for jewellery work creates small metal balls to decorate surfaces of objects. David investigated how rather than using this technique to decorate the surface of his sculptures, it could become the actual surface of the sculpture. Granulation thus became the subject of his sculptures and inspiration for new ones.

Atelier

The objects are decorated with silver spheres using the technique of granulation. Granulation is a decorative technique in goldsmith art where little spheres (granules) decorate a surface.

Métier

The objects are decorated with silver spheres using the technique of granulation. Granulation is a decorative technique in goldsmith art where little spheres (granules) decorate a surface.

Maison

Contact

David Huycke

www.davidhuycke.com

Contact

David Huycke

www.davidhuycke.com

Métier

The objects are decorated with silver spheres using the technique of granulation. Granulation is a decorative technique in goldsmith art where little spheres (granules) decorate a surface.

Biography

David Huycke

David Huycke is a Belgian silversmith artisan and professor at PXL-MAD School of Arts and at Hasselt University. He studied jewellery design and silversmith work at the Saint-Lucas School of Arts in Antwerp. Since 1993, David has worked as an independent artisan in the field of the sculptural art-objects. In 2010, he finished his PhD in Arts with the project, “The Metamorphic Ornament: Re-Thinking Granulation, a practice-based research on the contemporary artistic relevance of the ancient technique of granulation”. David’s current research focuses on the meaning of material-surface in the contemporary silver object. His work is shown in galleries and museums worldwide and features in permanent collections such as in the Design Museum in Ghent, the Röhsska Museum in Gothenburg, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the V&A in London and others.

Denmark  Both Sides Now Glass Sculpture This multi-coloured rectangular fused glass sculpture relates to the duality of things. Seen and interpreted through material connections between glass and ceramics, it reflects upon how there is always another side and how this might look and feel, depending on one’s perspective and perception.
Ida Wieth
Glass fusing
Fused glass sculpture Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

The object is made of blown glass canes containing metal oxides. The hollow glass “straight lines” are broken up into smaller units, bundled and melted together. This unit of fragile structural layers is then paired with another piece in ceramic. Subsequently, the two sides are twisted together with thin copper wire.

Maison

Contact

Ida Wieth

skovgaardsgade 3, godsbanen - spor 3 8000 Aarhus
+45 31571175
idawieth@gmail.com
idawieth.com

Contact

Ida Wieth

skovgaardsgade 3, godsbanen - spor 3 8000 Aarhus
+45 31571175
idawieth@gmail.com
idawieth.com

Métier

The object is made of blown glass canes containing metal oxides. The hollow glass “straight lines” are broken up into smaller units, bundled and melted together. This unit of fragile structural layers is then paired with another piece in ceramic. Subsequently, the two sides are twisted together with thin copper wire.

Biography

Ida Wieth

Ida Wieth was born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1983. She studied glassblowing at the Kosta Glass School in Sweden. In 2009, she graduated with a Master of Fine Art in glass from the Edinburgh College of Art in Scotland. She works with glass and ceramics, and occasionally wood, concrete and metals, to create innovative pieces. Ida combines an artistically poetic approach with tangible artisanal knowledge of materials and techniques, resulting in highly expressive and emotional works. Her work has been shown in Scandinavia, Europe, Russia, Japan and USA.

United Kingdom  Petrified Forest Series - 3
courtesy of: Cavaliero Finn Gallery
Ceramic sculpture This installation of eleven earth coloured handmade ceramic forms was created by Ashraf Hanna as a response to the uncovering of an ancient forest on the west coast of Wales in 2014. A storm uncovered the remains of 10,000-year-old trees.
Ashraf Hanna
Ceramicist
Installation of eleven earth coloured handmade ceramic forms Métier Story Atelier
Story

In the middle of winter at the start of 2014, a heavy storm hit the west coast of Wales. The high sea pushed the pebbles and sand away revealing an ancient forest that would have been used around ten thousand years ago by hunter-gatherers. The images of this discovery were published by British media at the time and these images inspired Ashraf Hanna’s series.

Atelier

Métier

Each piece is handmade starting from a pinch pot form slowly opened to shape the base. The form is then developed by adding soft slabs. Each layer has to dry sufficiently to support the next. The surface is then refined and the profile defined using metal scrappers and blades.

Maison

Contact

Ashraf Hanna C/o Cavaliero Finn Gallery

Cavaliero Finn Gallery, 268 Croxted Road SE24 9DA London
+44 07941200300
ashrafhanna.ceramics@btinternet.com
www.ashrafhanna.net

Contact

Ashraf Hanna C/o Cavaliero Finn Gallery

Cavaliero Finn Gallery, 268 Croxted Road SE24 9DA London
+44 07941200300
ashrafhanna.ceramics@btinternet.com
www.ashrafhanna.net

Métier

Each piece is handmade starting from a pinch pot form slowly opened to shape the base. The form is then developed by adding soft slabs. Each layer has to dry sufficiently to support the next. The surface is then refined and the profile defined using metal scrappers and blades.

Biography

Ashraf Hanna

Ashraf Hanna is an Egyptian born British artisan, living & working in the UK. Ashraf undertook an MA in Ceramics and Glass at the Royal College of Art, London, graduating in 2011. Ashraf builds individual and related groups of ceramic vessels by hand, each object informing the next. One of his major interests is the profiles, lines and spaces that emerge from this process of development and ultimately their placement in relation to one another, creating a contrast between the juxtaposition of sharp lines with softer curves. Ashraf works with a restricted palette of refined slips and stained clays. The pared-down natural and subtle surface treatments combine to produce vessels that explore the essence of form. His work is exhibited internationally and is in the permanent collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Museum of Wales.

United Kingdom  Winter Sketch Metal vessel The gilded white gold interior of this handmade sculptural steel vessel combines with the light tones of the overlapping perforated grey steel pieces that make up the exterior. This piece is reminiscent of a still winter day, and explores ideas of transformation, perceived value and the process of making.
Claire Malet
Metal-work
Handmade sculptural steel vessel Métier Story Atelier
Story

Through her ‘re-formed steel can pieces’, Claire explores ideas of transformation, perceived value and the process of making. Each piece is hand worked from a single steel can, taking many hours.

Atelier

Métier

Taking many hours, each piece is hand worked from a re-formed steel can, transforming steel into a ‘precious’ vessel.

Maison

Contact

Claire Malet

+44 7913 813458
claire@clairemalet.com
www.clairemalet.com

Contact

Claire Malet

+44 7913 813458
claire@clairemalet.com
www.clairemalet.com

Métier

Taking many hours, each piece is hand worked from a re-formed steel can, transforming steel into a ‘precious’ vessel.

Biography

Claire Malet

Claire Malet is a metalsmith artisan who works with precious, non-precious and found-metals. The shapes and textures of natural forms and landscapes such as fragments of sea-worn shells and rock formations of battered coastline inspire Claire’s work. She also finds inspiration in the characteristics of the medium, working intuitively and allowing the metal to suggest a direction. Claire is particularly drawn to vessel forms, which she believes are one of the most basic and universal of objects, in daily mundane use and play vital roles at occasions of celebration and honour. Claire works from her studio in rural Herefordshire and exhibits in the UK and internationally including at ‘Collect’ held annually at the Saatchi Gallery, London. She has pieces in several public collections, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

United Kingdom  Flared Vessel Metal vessel These vessels explore the idea of transformation, perceived value and the process of making. The gilded autumn-coloured interior of this handmade sculptural steel vessel contrasts with the design of the overlapping perforated grey steel that makes up the exterior.
Claire Malet
Metal-work
Handmade sculptural steel vessel Métier Story Atelier
Story

Through her ‘re-formed steel can pieces’, Claire explores ideas of transformation, perceived value and the process of making. Each piece is hand worked from a single steel can, taking many hours.

Atelier

Métier

Taking many hours, each piece is hand worked from a re-formed steel can, transforming steel into a ‘precious’ vessel.

Maison

Contact

Claire Malet

+44 7913 813458
claire@clairemalet.com
www.clairemalet.com

Contact

Claire Malet

+44 7913 813458
claire@clairemalet.com
www.clairemalet.com

Métier

Taking many hours, each piece is hand worked from a re-formed steel can, transforming steel into a ‘precious’ vessel.

Biography

Claire Malet

Claire Malet is a metalsmith artisan who works with precious, non-precious and found-metals. The shapes and textures of natural forms and landscapes such as fragments of sea-worn shells and rock formations of battered coastline inspire Claire’s work. She also finds inspiration in the characteristics of the medium, working intuitively and allowing the metal to suggest a direction. Claire is particularly drawn to vessel forms, which she believes are one of the most basic and universal of objects, in daily mundane use and play vital roles at occasions of celebration and honour. Claire works from her studio in rural Herefordshire and exhibits in the UK and internationally including at ‘Collect’ held annually at the Saatchi Gallery, London. She has pieces in several public collections, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

United Kingdom  Eclipse 2, 2018
courtesy of: Cavaliero Finn Gallery
Ceramic sculpture This circular sculpture with multiple visible layers is made of different light blue and grey pieces of oxide stained stoneware, and has been mathematically constructed. The individual pieces of ceramic are made by throwing clay on a potter’s wheel.
Matthew Chambers
Ceramicist
Circular stoneware sculpture with multiple visible layers Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

Pieces of oxide-stained stoneware are thrown on a potter’s wheel then combined. Each piece is sculpted and polished with diamond abrasives to achieve a smooth finish.

Maison

Contact

Matthew Chambers C/o Cavaliero Finn Gallery

Cavaliero Finn Gallery, 268 Croxted Road SE24 9DA London
+44 07941200300
mattchambers1@hotmail.com
www.matthewchambers.net

Contact

Matthew Chambers C/o Cavaliero Finn Gallery

Cavaliero Finn Gallery, 268 Croxted Road SE24 9DA London
+44 07941200300
mattchambers1@hotmail.com
www.matthewchambers.net

Métier

Pieces of oxide-stained stoneware are thrown on a potter’s wheel then combined. Each piece is sculpted and polished with diamond abrasives to achieve a smooth finish.

Biography

Matthew Chambers

The works of British ceramic sculptor Matthew Chambers are born from a love of geometry, optical art, modern architecture and design. He pursues these interests in an abstract sense by exploring shapes and making mathematically constructed pieces in clay, created from many different wheel-thrown sections. His sculptures convey individual properties of space, light and colour, and sustain an expression of abstract as well as rhythmical beauty. Matthew attended the Royal College of Art, London obtaining an MA in Ceramics and Glass in 2004. His works can be found in public collections in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, National Museum, Scotland, the Musée National de Ceramique de Sevres, France, the Musée Ariana, Geneva and in various private collections worldwide.

United Kingdom  Spiral, 2018
courtesy of: Cavaliero Finn Gallery
Ceramic sculpture This sculpture comprises combined sections of wheel-thrown, oxide-stained stoneware. The exterior of this circular dark earth brown sculpture contrasts with the blue ceramic interior of the object. The multiple visible layers have been mathematically constructed.
Matthew Chambers
Ceramicist
Stoneware sculpture Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

Pieces of oxide stained stoneware are thrown on a potter’s wheel then combined. Each piece is sculpted and polished with diamond abrasives to achieve a smooth finish.

Maison

Contact

Matthew Chambers C/o Cavaliero Finn Gallery

Cavaliero Finn Gallery, 268 Croxted Road SE24 9DA London
+44 07941200300
mattchambers1@hotmail.com
www.matthewchambers.net

Contact

Matthew Chambers C/o Cavaliero Finn Gallery

Cavaliero Finn Gallery, 268 Croxted Road SE24 9DA London
+44 07941200300
mattchambers1@hotmail.com
www.matthewchambers.net

Métier

Pieces of oxide stained stoneware are thrown on a potter’s wheel then combined. Each piece is sculpted and polished with diamond abrasives to achieve a smooth finish.

Biography

Matthew Chambers

The works of British ceramic sculptor Matthew Chambers are born from a love of geometry, optical art, modern architecture and design. He pursues these interests in an abstract sense by exploring shapes and making mathematically constructed pieces in clay, created from many different wheel-thrown sections. His sculptures convey individual properties of space, light and colour, and sustain an expression of abstract as well as rhythmical beauty. Matthew attended the Royal College of Art, London obtaining an MA in Ceramics and Glass in 2004. His works can be found in public collections in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, National Museum, Scotland, the Musée National de Ceramique de Sevres, France, the Musée Ariana, Geneva and in various private collections worldwide.

United Kingdom  Patera Metal vessel Patera is a satin oxidised silver bowl inspired by astronomy. To Kevin Grey, beauty is expressed through simplicity of form, lines and volume. The decorative quality of Patera is achieved through the repetition of these simple elements.
Kevin Grey
Silversmith
Polished silver bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

The work Kevin produces is inspired by the tradition of Scandinavian design and a responsive attitude to making. The processes he uses couple traditional metalworking skills with new technology – originally laser welded but now TIG welded. Individual strips of silver are hand-formed before being joined together to form a complex surface. A number of surface elements within one piece can collide to create contrasting smooth and jagged edges resulting in decorative qualities and surface depth. From the outset of its creation, the volume and shape that the final piece will take is visualised, but the surface quality and resulting jagged edges only emerge as the work is made.

Atelier

Métier

Patera is made from hand cut and hand shaped strips of silver that are TIP welded together. The outer construction is welded to a hand shaped and planished (flattened) inner bowl.

Maison

Contact

Kevin Grey

+44 7933 302557
kevin@kevingrey.co.uk
kevingrey.co.uk

Contact

Kevin Grey

+44 7933 302557
kevin@kevingrey.co.uk
kevingrey.co.uk

Métier

Patera is made from hand cut and hand shaped strips of silver that are TIP welded together. The outer construction is welded to a hand shaped and planished (flattened) inner bowl.

Biography

Kevin Grey

Kevin Grey creates unique silver pieces, using TIG welding techniques to join individual formed pieces of metal. For 25 years, Kevin worked within the luxury automotive industry, handmaking pieces for Rolls Royce, Bentley and the Morgan Motor Company as well as for clients around the world. Kevin then started silver work in 2007 upon commencing a two-year programme at the Birmingham School of Jewellery, followed by a two-year artist residency. His accumulated knowledge has provided him with an approach to silver work that extends beyond and complements silversmith traditions. His creative design process invariably leads to a technical challenge that he enjoys resolving. To do so he draws on his intuitive approach and his ability to stretch, shape and join metal precisely, with extraordinary levels of skill and creativity.

United Kingdom  Erosion Jar 37 ‘moon 3’ Ceramic vessel This highly textured, hand formed raku fired ceramic vessel is inspired by the patterns of the land which are formed by its geology, erosion and by human intervention.
Patricia Shone
Ceramicist
Ceramic vase Métier Story Atelier
Story

Patricia Shone creates mostly functional forms such as jars and bowls rather than a direct representation of the landscape because they are innately human vessels. They represent the human condition of surface and content. Her works are intricately linked to the landscapes of the Isle of Skye and recount stories of the effects and force of nature on the landscape. Patricia lets go of her rational control of the clay and works with it to allow a natural development of textures such as the formation and erosion of the land.

Atelier

Métier

The pieces are hand formed from solid lumps by texturing and stretching, sometimes by throwing, sometimes carving. The muted colours are achieved mostly by the processes of wood firing, tanka firing and raku firing and from different clay bodies.

Maison

Contact

Patricia Shone

+44 1471 844321
studio@patriciashone.co.uk
www.patriciashone.co.uk

Contact

Patricia Shone

+44 1471 844321
studio@patriciashone.co.uk
www.patriciashone.co.uk

Métier

The pieces are hand formed from solid lumps by texturing and stretching, sometimes by throwing, sometimes carving. The muted colours are achieved mostly by the processes of wood firing, tanka firing and raku firing and from different clay bodies.

Biography

Patricia Shone

Patricia Shone is a potter who has worked and lived on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, for the past twenty years. Her highly textured ceramics are entirely hand formed using the weight of the clay to stretch and distort patterns on the surfaces. Her work has developed significantly using this technique, which with various firing methods results in a range of ceramic objects reflecting the geology of the island. The power of remote landscapes, the weather and the inhospitable nature of the Isle of Skye are themes central to Patricia’s works. Her work tries to give a sense of this force of nature through spontaneously formed textures, unpredictable firing techniques, and the acceptance of failures as well as successes.

Ireland  Coral Hollowed Form Ceramic sculpture This white porcelain sculpture is constructed from a complex, repetitive pattern based on the structure found in coral. The work combines the principles of regular geometry from natural forms in the overall dimensions and the principles of fractal/irregular geometry in the structure of the piece.
Nuala O’Donovan
Ceramicist
White porcelain sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

The pieces have a stillness, like shells and fossils, even though they capture evidence of energy in the variation and scale of the elements in the patterns. Energy is apparent in the making of the work, but it is not energy in itself. The energy in her work is not gestural; it is more compressed, the pieces describing the journey of the making of the work that is laborious rather than free.

Atelier

Métier

Sculptural forms in unglazed porcelain clay. Hand-built slowly over months from small individually made pieces, with multiple firings. The finished work is then fired at 1280°C.

Maison

Contact

Nuala O’Donovan

Cork
nualaodonovan@hotmail.com
www.nualaodonovan.com

Contact

Nuala O’Donovan

Cork
nualaodonovan@hotmail.com
www.nualaodonovan.com

Métier

Sculptural forms in unglazed porcelain clay. Hand-built slowly over months from small individually made pieces, with multiple firings. The finished work is then fired at 1280°C.

Biography

Nuala O’Donovan

Nuala O’Donovan, is an Irish sculptor who primarily works with porcelain clay. Her abstract forms take their inspiration from natural forms, in particular the patterns and geometry of living organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms. Living forms are a progression rather than a static form, they are in a constant process of change. The forms in her work evoke this progression, evolving during the making process but becoming static after being fired. Each element of the pattern is individually made, the form is constructed slowly over a period of weeks or months. Nuala completed a BA in Three-Dimensional Design at Middlesex University in the UK in 1994 and studied Ceramics at the Crawford College of Art and Design, graduating with an MA in 2008.

Switzerland  Bowl
courtesy of: Officine Saffi
Ceramic vessel Parabola-shaped bowls with porcelain thorns spread throughout the surface of the object, engraved with finely graded lines.
Arnold Annen
Ceramicist
Parabola shaped porcelain bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

Annen works the material to its physical limit because he aims to make his work as light as possible with a maximum translucency. The atmosphere of the light caught in the shell emerges from the variations in the relief.

Atelier

A basic form is turned on a lathe and a plaster mould is made from the shape. A reinforced structure is created in the mould in order to stabilise the very thin bowl before it is fired. Liquid clay is poured into the mould and turned quickly for exactly 100 seconds. The clay is then poured out leaving a 2mm thick layer of porcelain in the mould which is then fired. The largest bowls are decorated with various sets of motifs.

Métier

A basic form is turned on a potter’s wheel and a plaster mould is made from the shape. Liquid clay is poured into the mould and turned quickly for exactly 100 seconds. The clay is then poured out leaving a 2mm thick layer of porcelain in the mould. The large bowls are decorated with various motifs. On the first bowl, Annen adds hundreds of porcelain spikes to the surface with an injection tool filled with porcelain slip. To the second bowl, he creates with extreme precision a series of finely graded lines, following the grooves previously marked with a felt-tip pen. He uses special engraving tools from Japan, reinforced and sharpened, so that he can work on the surface even when it has reached its maximum hardness.

Maison

Contact

Arnold Annen - Atelier K3

Klngelbergstrasse 5 4056 Basel
+41 78 753 84 85
arnold.annen@bluewin.ch
arnoldannen.com

Contact

Arnold Annen - Atelier K3

Klngelbergstrasse 5 4056 Basel
+41 78 753 84 85
arnold.annen@bluewin.ch
arnoldannen.com

Métier

A basic form is turned on a potter’s wheel and a plaster mould is made from the shape. Liquid clay is poured into the mould and turned quickly for exactly 100 seconds. The clay is then poured out leaving a 2mm thick layer of porcelain in the mould. The large bowls are decorated with various motifs. On the first bowl, Annen adds hundreds of porcelain spikes to the surface with an injection tool filled with porcelain slip. To the second bowl, he creates with extreme precision a series of finely graded lines, following the grooves previously marked with a felt-tip pen. He uses special engraving tools from Japan, reinforced and sharpened, so that he can work on the surface even when it has reached its maximum hardness.

Biography

Arnold Annen

Born in 1952 in Gstaad, Switzerland Arnold Annen studied at the Bern Design School and completed his practical training in Jean-Claude de Crousaz, Pierre Mestre's (France) and Sakakibara's (Japan) workshops. In 1989, he opened his own studio in Basel. Arnold is famous above all for his works in Limoges porcelain. Over the years, he has refined his technique, which is an unmistakable hallmark of his work. He makes transparent bowls as thin as paper. To reach this level of perfection, his procedures involve a disciplined approach, along with sophisticated manual techniques. He has developed small and large porcelain objects, dedicating particular attention to space, volume and interstitial spaces.The extremely thin walls of his bowls make it impossible to correct errors. Even the smallest bubble would ruin a piece.

Switzerland  Eucyrtis
courtesy of: Officine Saffi
Ceramic vessel Amphorae-shaped sculptures with different sized circular holes spread throughout the surface of the object. The sculptures rest on their sides. These objects reveal different types of transparency. The sculptures are irregular, like skeletons, and their shapes create a complex system of shadows.
Arnold Annen
Ceramicist
Amphorae shaped objects Métier Story Atelier
Story

Arnold Annen's work results from archetypes of fossil-like shapes and visualises the genesis of new life forms. Mitre, seed vessels, marine creatures, unicellular organisms, radiolaria, technological products: the range of associations can be very wide and creates an imaginary time-space that is open to the past as well as to the future.

Atelier

A basic form is turned on a lathe and a plaster mould is made from the shape. A reinforced structure is created in the mould in order to stabilise the very thin bowl before it is fired. Liquid clay is poured into the mould and turned quickly for exactly 100 seconds. The clay is then poured out leaving a 2mm thick layer of porcelain in the mould which is then fired. The largest bowls are decorated with various sets of motifs.

Métier

A basic form is turned on a potter’s wheel and a plaster mould is made from the shape. A little quantity of liquid porcelain is poured into the mould. While Arnold turns the mould in all directions, a thin layer of porcelain sticks to the mould. In a next step this basic shape is deformed and perforated, and finally hundreds of thorns are added to its surface. The maximum translucency is obtained by reduction firing the objects up to 1,330°C.

Maison

Contact

Arnold Annen - Atelier K3

Klngelbergstrasse 5 4056 Basel
+41 78 753 84 85
arnold.annen@bluewin.ch
arnoldannen.com

Contact

Arnold Annen - Atelier K3

Klngelbergstrasse 5 4056 Basel
+41 78 753 84 85
arnold.annen@bluewin.ch
arnoldannen.com

Métier

A basic form is turned on a potter’s wheel and a plaster mould is made from the shape. A little quantity of liquid porcelain is poured into the mould. While Arnold turns the mould in all directions, a thin layer of porcelain sticks to the mould. In a next step this basic shape is deformed and perforated, and finally hundreds of thorns are added to its surface. The maximum translucency is obtained by reduction firing the objects up to 1,330°C.

Biography

Arnold Annen

Born in 1952 in Gstaad, Switzerland Arnold Annen studied at the Bern Design School and completed his practical training in Jean-Claude de Crousaz, Pierre Mestre's (France) and Sakakibara's (Japan) workshops. In 1989, he opened his own studio in Basel. Arnold is famous above all for his works in Limoges porcelain. Over the years, he has refined his technique, which is an unmistakable hallmark of his work. He makes transparent bowls as thin as paper. To reach this level of perfection, his procedures involve a disciplined approach, along with sophisticated manual techniques. He has developed small and large porcelain objects, dedicating particular attention to space, volume and interstitial spaces.The extremely thin walls of his bowls make it impossible to correct errors. Even the smallest bubble would ruin a piece.

Germany  Books of Disquiet Glass Sculpture "Books of Disquiet" is an ongoing series of works reflecting the desire to control the fleeting thought process and freeze moments of this liquid space. These opaque glass books are physical manifestations of the intangible phenomenon of imagination.
Anne Petters
Glass work
Kiln formed glass book Métier Story Atelier
Story

Anne Petters' works aim to convey an ephemeral, fleeting moment and show how we crystallise personal moments by experiencing, memorising and collecting. The flow of incidents and the uniqueness of every moment is what interests her. She sees this as a fragile system through which we must navigate, comparable to an amorphous structure in glass. Anne uses glass to capture the notion of these ephemeral moments. Anne sees in glass a material that is “in between”, its multifarious nature characterised by transformations, transitions and transparency.

Atelier

Métier

The books are kiln formed, the sheets fused on the left side of the stack. Anne Petters shapes each individual page in the kiln at about 700°C, applying fibreglass insulation material between the pages during the process so they do not collapse.

Maison

Contact

Anne Petters

40 Cambria Road SE5 9AE London
+44 7 401 66 37 62
petters.anne@gmail.com
www.annepetters.com

Contact

Anne Petters

40 Cambria Road SE5 9AE London
+44 7 401 66 37 62
petters.anne@gmail.com
www.annepetters.com

Métier

The books are kiln formed, the sheets fused on the left side of the stack. Anne Petters shapes each individual page in the kiln at about 700°C, applying fibreglass insulation material between the pages during the process so they do not collapse.

Biography

Anne Petters

Anne Petters is a multimedia artist with a strong background in glass. In 2011, she received her MFA in Sculpture/ Glass from Alfred University, New York. Born in Dresden in 1978, Anne grew up in the German Democratic Republic. She understands the political change in her country, which she experienced as a displacement of reality, as a basic influence on her lifestyle and artistic work. Her interest in controlling and displaying moments of fleeting and vulnerable existence leads her to a poetic, metaphoric use of glass and other materials. Anne has been awarded numerous artist residencies. In 2014, she received the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST) Scholarship. Anne has taught as visiting lecturer at the Royal College of Art, London and is currently leading the glass studio at the City and Guilds of London Art School.

Italy  Testone Ceramic sculpture The head of Michelangelo’s iconic David lies profile sideways. A tiny porcelain woman has taken shelter inside the rough interior surface of the broken head.
Andrea Salvatori
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Andrea Salvatori loves to wander through flea markets and has built a collection of pacchiana - small “chocolate box” collectible figurines. He works with these collected statues by altering them or working with them alongside new subjects. With meticulous attention to detail Andrea’s ceramic creations recreate each and every detail of these sculptures or parts of sculptures, resulting in exact copies of the originals. However, Andrea’s originality and sense of humour are quickly visible through his little alterations to these copied subjects, such as placing small figurines around the sculptures. What could at first sight be thought of as “kitsch” is thus transformed into a piece of comic irony.

Atelier

Métier

Andrea Salvatori produces ceramic pieces through plaster moulds. He uses different types of clay to create unique works of art or design objects in limited edition.

Maison

Métier

Andrea Salvatori produces ceramic pieces through plaster moulds. He uses different types of clay to create unique works of art or design objects in limited edition.

Biography

Andrea Salvatori

Andrea Salvatori lives and works near Faenza in Italy. He attended the Istituto d’Arte per la Ceramica in Faenza where he first began to work with glazed earthenware. He graduated in Sculpture from the Accademia di Belle Arti of Bologna in 2000. Andrea’s works juxtapose meticulous copies of classical stone statues with new subjects, contrasting contemporary themes with kitsch aesthetic. Andrea sometimes combines his porcelain sculptures with objects such as Murano glass vases, Meissen porcelain miniatures and Ginori period ceramics that he finds in flea markets across Europe. His detailed works demonstrate his mastery of ceramics. Since 1997, Andrea has exhibited his works in several national and international solo and collective exhibitions.

France  Beauty Belt Metal sculpture This large brass sculpture illustrates Elie Hirsch’s desire to bridge a connection between sculpture and jewellery. The form is reminiscent of a tightly fitted necklace.
Elie Hirsch
Metal-work
Brass sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Elie’s works create a strong link between jewellery and sculpture. He likes to enrich his sculptures with what jewellery brings to him and give jewels what sculpture makes him feel.

Atelier

Métier

Using techniques similar to those used for brass-work, Elie Hirsch shapes sheets of metal with a hammer. He cuts out a shape from the metal sheet, and then welds the different worked-on sheets together. Finally, he hammers this final form into shape. To create volume he hammers it or adds material.

Maison

Contact

Elie Hirsch

52 rue Janson 89570 Sormery
+33 6 62 80 87 36
eliehirsch@gmail.com
www.eliehirsch.com

Contact

Elie Hirsch

52 rue Janson 89570 Sormery
+33 6 62 80 87 36
eliehirsch@gmail.com
www.eliehirsch.com

Métier

Using techniques similar to those used for brass-work, Elie Hirsch shapes sheets of metal with a hammer. He cuts out a shape from the metal sheet, and then welds the different worked-on sheets together. Finally, he hammers this final form into shape. To create volume he hammers it or adds material.

Biography

Elie Hirsch

Elie Hirsch graduated in ceramic design in 2001 and metal sculpture in 2003. For two years, he worked with sculptor Hervé Wahlen in his workshop. Elie is a laureate of the competition "Jeunes créateurs des ateliers d'art de France" in which he participated in 2007. He participates every year in numerous fairs and exhibitions in France and abroad.

Netherlands  Flowerbomb Ceramic vessel These three flower pattern porcelain cylinders with inlaid colours were made as the result of a visit to the gardens of Wakehurst in the UK.
Maria Ten Kortenaar
Ceramicist
Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

Porcelain objects made using an inlay technique called nerikomi. Each piece is handmade and unique.

Maison

Contact

Keramiek Atelier Maria Ten Kortenaar

Hoogte Kadijk 42 1018 BM Amsterdam
+31 6 51994825
info@mariatenkortenaar.nl
www.mariatenkortenaar.com

Contact

Keramiek Atelier Maria Ten Kortenaar

Hoogte Kadijk 42 1018 BM Amsterdam
+31 6 51994825
info@mariatenkortenaar.nl
www.mariatenkortenaar.com

Métier

Porcelain objects made using an inlay technique called nerikomi. Each piece is handmade and unique.

Biography

Maria Ten Kortenaar

To Maria Ten Kortenaar, porcelain is a medium that allows her to express what she perceives, feels and experiences in everyday life. Through porcelain, she is able to translate her impressions into artworks. Happiness, sunsets, rainy days and landscapes that she observes in real life all find their way into her artwork. The titles are links to her personal memories. There are two different layers to her work. The visible layer: to emphasise the many colours in her works, Maria chooses to keep the form as simple as possible, choosing the cylinder. Her cylinders are built up from smaller fragments. To draw the attention of the viewer, she disturbs the pattern just slightly. This uneasiness catches the eye. There is harmony and there is disharmony, created with a rhythm. The emotional layer: the colours and composition tell her story, while the white porcelain serves as the blank sheet of paper on which her story is written. It is her aim to translate our inner life in such a way that it becomes visible to others.

Italy  I volti di Kosmosandalon (The faces of Kosmosandalon)
courtesy of: La Fucina di Efesto
Metal sculpture This steel, bronze and copper cyclopean orchid was forged, wrought and finished with a mirror polish and is a tribute to the Classicism and to the philosophical reflection. The Greeks called this orchid "Kosmosandalon”, sandal of the world
Alessandro Rametta
Metal-work
Metal flower Métier Story Atelier
Story

La Fucina di Efesto forge has hammered life back into the old stone walls of a recently renovated stable that belonged to a Benedictine Order as far back as 1624. La Fucina has established itself as a meeting place for traditional, innovative research and experimentation. The studio works on a large range of designs such as sculptures, interior and exterior designs as well as prototypes. The studio bridges a path between mastered traditional techniques and innovative, state-of-the-art metalworking equipment.

Atelier

Master metalworker Alessandro Rametta founded La Fucina di Efesto over 20 years ago. As from 1997, La Fucina di Efesto has dedicated itself to research and experimentation in fields concerning iron and metals with great passion and skill. The research of La Fucina di Efesto gives a concrete and visible shape to the knowledge of matter and its transformational principles. Thus, the experimentation applied to metal sculpture and design goes through unexplored creative techniques. As part of its Studio Collections, La Fucina di Efesto examines many metal sculptural and pictorial properties. The workshop seeks to combine aesthetics with functionality by drawing inspiration from ancient workmanship and testing a common language for sculpture and self-made design. This giant orchid made from stainless steel and bronze was shaped on a forge fire with a silver alloy. A rippling pattern was created by forging several pieces of metal with different compositions together. The sculpture has been finished with a mirror polish.

Métier

This giant orchid made from stainless steel, bronze and copper was shaped on a forge fire with a silver alloy. A rippling pattern was created by forging several pieces of metal with different compositions together. The sculpture has been finished with a mirror polish.

Maison

Master metalworker Alessandro Rametta founded La Fucina di Efesto over 20 years ago. As from 1997, La Fucina di Efesto has dedicated itself to research and experimentation in fields concerning iron and metals with great passion and skill. The research of La Fucina di Efesto gives a concrete and visible shape to the knowledge of matter and its transformational principles. Thus, the experimentation applied to metal sculpture and design goes through unexplored creative techniques. As part of its Studio Collections, La Fucina di Efesto examines many metal sculptural and pictorial properties. The workshop seeks to combine aesthetics with functionality by drawing inspiration from ancient workmanship and testing a common language for sculpture and self-made design.

Contact

Alessandro Rametta

Via Arrivabene 24 20158 Milano
+39 0223163539
info@lafucinadiefesto.com
www.lafucinadiefesto.com

Contact

Alessandro Rametta

Via Arrivabene 24 20158 Milano
+39 0223163539
info@lafucinadiefesto.com
www.lafucinadiefesto.com

Métier

This giant orchid made from stainless steel, bronze and copper was shaped on a forge fire with a silver alloy. A rippling pattern was created by forging several pieces of metal with different compositions together. The sculpture has been finished with a mirror polish.

Biography

Alessandro Rametta

Italian master metalworker Alessandro Rametta is a self-taught sculptor. He is inspired by the infinite expressive possibilities of metal, the distant memories that reverberate through the matter, the familiarity of a material that holds ancient secrets. Alessandro works in an intuitive manner, developing his own refined techniques while experimenting on the subjects that he believes to have the highest expressive potential to explore. Alessandro founded La Fucina di Efesto over 20 years ago and has since been creating works for renowned artists and designers, including sculptures for collections in Italy and around the world. Alessandro places special importance on transferring knowledge and teaching, and places much emphasis on creative ethics. The Cologni Foundation in Milan gave Alessandro the title of Master of Art.

Portugal  Filigree Mirror
courtesy of: Boca do Lobo
Furniture The concave frame of this circular mirror was hammered from a single sheet of brass. The frame of the mirror, which extends across the wall, is made from brass cords, gilded with 18k gold. The name of the mirror is taken from the technique used to make the frame, filigree. This is one of the oldest jewellery making techniques known.
Boca do Lobo
Filigree
Rui Pinto
Jeweller, Goldsmith
Mirror with filigree metal frame Métier Story Atelier
Story

Completely handcrafted, each brass cord is fitted with precision. The shape of the Filigree Mirror is a traditional one in Portuguese culture and art. A true work of art, this luxurious mirror plays tribute to Boca do Lobo's core values: heritage and craftsmanship.

Atelier

Furniture designers and manufacturers Boca do Lobo strive to encourage sensational experiences by creating beautiful pieces passionately handcrafted in Portugal by master artisans who love what they do. Their designers possess an undeniable talent for composing pieces that stir emotions. Boca do Lobo artisans' knowledge, accumulated over years of experience, is imparted with love through their craftsmanship. A dynamic process of innovation, within both technology and design, forces Boca do Lobo to continually reinterpret the brand. No detail or element is overlooked as they offer the very best pieces at the frontier between design and art. Each piece brings the viewer into Boca do Lobo’s world - a world of emotions. Filigree is a delicate jewellery technique used to work precious metals. Skilled artisans painstakingly solder tiny beads and twisted threads to create striking motifs, evocative of an intricate lace-like pattern.

Métier

Filigree is a delicate jewellery technique used to work precious metals. Skilled artisans painstakingly solder tiny beads and twisted threads to create striking motifs, evocative of an intricate lace-like pattern.

Maison

Furniture designers and manufacturers Boca do Lobo strive to encourage sensational experiences by creating beautiful pieces passionately handcrafted in Portugal by master artisans who love what they do. Their designers possess an undeniable talent for composing pieces that stir emotions. Boca do Lobo artisans' knowledge, accumulated over years of experience, is imparted with love through their craftsmanship. A dynamic process of innovation, within both technology and design, forces Boca do Lobo to continually reinterpret the brand. No detail or element is overlooked as they offer the very best pieces at the frontier between design and art. Each piece brings the viewer into Boca do Lobo’s world - a world of emotions.

Contact

Boca do Lobo

Rua Particular de Regueirais nº 33 4435-379 Rio Tinto Porto
+351 910 010 529
info@bocadolobo.com
www.bocadolobo.com

Contact

Boca do Lobo

Rua Particular de Regueirais nº 33 4435-379 Rio Tinto Porto
+351 910 010 529
info@bocadolobo.com
www.bocadolobo.com



Métier

Filigree is a delicate jewellery technique used to work precious metals. Skilled artisans painstakingly solder tiny beads and twisted threads to create striking motifs, evocative of an intricate lace-like pattern.

Biography

Boca do Lobo

Furniture designers and manufacturers Boca do Lobo strive to encourage sensational experiences by creating beautiful pieces passionately handcrafted in Portugal by master artisans who love what they do. Their designers possess an undeniable talent for composing pieces that stir emotions. Boca do Lobo artisans' knowledge, accumulated over years of experience, is imparted with love through their craftsmanship. A dynamic process of innovation, within both technology and design, forces Boca do Lobo to continually reinterpret the brand. No detail or element is overlooked as they offer the very best pieces at the frontier between design and art. Each piece brings the viewer into Boca do Lobo’s world - a world of emotions.

Biography

Rui Pinto

Rui Pinto is a natural-born artisan, with 16 years’ experience in jewellery design and making. He masters several jewellery techniques, predominantly the delicate filigree technique. Trained in the North of Portugal, his art represents a fine narrative in a new generation of artists. His artisanship expresses a personal artistic path and honours his country’s history and traditions. Rui emphasises his creative expression and his designs are essential for the development of fine art. As an artisan developing high value jewellery concepts, his knowledge is perceived as equivalent to the preciousness of the materials his works are made from.

Germany  Between the tides
courtesy of: Porzellanatelier Claudia Biehne & Stefan Passig
Ceramic sculpture This handmade white porcelain sculpture resembles the delicate structure of coral. The circular pieces of porcelain placed side by side are almost translucent in their width.
Claudia Biehne
Ceramicist
Porcelain sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

One of the first objects that Claudia Biehne built in her “Behind the Tides” series took her up to two weeks to make. She wanted to build a piece larger than she had ever built before. She added segment after segment until the final shape materialised. Consequently, she had quite a few problems fitting it into the kiln. During the firing, she was impatient to see the final result and upon opening the kiln found a large pile of broken fragments. Patience, experience and the joy of experimentation form the basis of this series.

Atelier

Claudia Biehne builds her porcelain sculpture by assembling numerous pieces of intricately worked porcelain.

Métier

Claudia Biehne builds her porcelain sculpture by assembling numerous pieces of intricately worked porcelain piece by piece. Because of this method of assembly, Claudia uses a “support” material to which the porcelain adheres and burns away when the final sculpture is fired.

Maison

Contact

Claudia Biehne

Spinnereistraße 7 Haus 10, PF 616 D-04179 Leipzig
+49 341 260 85 30
biehne@yahoo.de
www.biehne-porzellan.de

Contact

Claudia Biehne

Spinnereistraße 7 Haus 10, PF 616 D-04179 Leipzig
+49 341 260 85 30
biehne@yahoo.de
www.biehne-porzellan.de

Métier

Claudia Biehne builds her porcelain sculpture by assembling numerous pieces of intricately worked porcelain piece by piece. Because of this method of assembly, Claudia uses a “support” material to which the porcelain adheres and burns away when the final sculpture is fired.

Biography

Claudia Biehne

Claudia Biehne’s works merge sculptural and applied art disciplines together. Porcelain is worked in a modern way articulating her signature. Claudia takes great pleasure in experimenting and is simply curious to discover and push the limits of what is possible. Her works draw inspiration from and reflect natural marvels and developments, because she finds in nature the archetype of all creations and the cradle of experience. Claudia’s works are found in several museums and international private collections. Claudia’s porcelain workshop strives to obtain a high-ranking position in the German ceramics scene. The porcelain studio located in the former cotton-spinning mill in Leipzig, is open to visitors.

United Kingdom  Gathering Places | Grammar of Ornament - India ii Ceramic vessel This multicoloured jagged-edged ceramic bowl was created as part of a collection of works that build upon an ongoing interest in the pattern book “The Grammar of Ornament” by Owen Jones. At first sight, the bowl would seem to be made of different sections fitted together like a puzzle. Each “section” is made up of intricately decorated patterns.
Frances Priest
Ceramicist
Clay, glaze and vitreous slip. Métier Story Atelier
Story

Frances Priest’s work uses drawing and ceramics to explore and interpret languages of ornament from different cultures, places and periods in history. Gathering Places | Grammar of Ornament - India ii was created as part of a collection of works that build upon an ongoing interest in the pattern book "The Grammar of Ornament" by Owen Jones. Looking specifically at plates 49 to 55 covering Indian Ornament, this new collection reflects on those motifs and patterns in relation to recent travels in South West India, re-interpreting these experiences to create playful and intriguing ceramic forms and surfaces.

Atelier

Métier

Incised ceramic with oxide wash, glaze and vitreous slip.

Maison

Contact

Studio 8 Abbeymount Techbase

2 Easter Road EH7 5AN Edinburgh
+44 78796 36358
mail@francespriest.co.uk
www.francespriest.co.uk

Contact

Studio 8 Abbeymount Techbase

2 Easter Road EH7 5AN Edinburgh
+44 78796 36358
mail@francespriest.co.uk
www.francespriest.co.uk

Métier

Incised ceramic with oxide wash, glaze and vitreous slip.

Biography

Frances Priest

Frances Priest graduated from the Edinburgh College of Art with a BA and PGDip in Ceramics in 1999. She combines studio-based practice with site-specific projects. Frances uses drawing and ceramics to explore and interpret languages of ornament from different cultures, places and periods in history. From her Edinburgh studio, she creates ceramic objects using clay as a canvas on which to build surfaces of inlaid line, coloured glaze and enamel decals. The relationship between making and drawing is essential to these explorations, with ceramics as an ideal material to push between the two states. Her work has been recognised at a national and international level with pieces held in private and public collections including National Museums Scotland, the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Fitzwilliam Museum. She lives and works in Edinburgh.

Italy  Ciotola con petali (Bowl with petals) Stone vessel This ornate alabaster bowl was hand turned on a lathe. The surface of the bowl has been minutely sculpted in a bas-relief. The dark colour of this agate alabaster derives from deposits of iron salts.
Gloria Giannelli
Stone sculptor
Alabaster Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

The works are hand shaped on a lathe. An alabaster block is placed on a lathe that rotates the stone at controlled speeds. The surface of the alabaster is then slowly chiselled off using the power of the rotation against the chisel. The finished bowl is then sculpted by hand and finally polished using traditional techniques.

Maison

Contact

Gloria Giannelli

Via Don Giovanni Minzoni, 13, 56048 Volterra
+39 0588 84030

Contact

Gloria Giannelli

Via Don Giovanni Minzoni, 13, 56048 Volterra
+39 0588 84030

Métier

The works are hand shaped on a lathe. An alabaster block is placed on a lathe that rotates the stone at controlled speeds. The surface of the alabaster is then slowly chiselled off using the power of the rotation against the chisel. The finished bowl is then sculpted by hand and finally polished using traditional techniques.

Biography

Gloria Giannelli

Gloria Giannelli lives and works with alabaster in Volterra, Italy. Her works enhance the qualities of the materials she works with and demonstrate the transparency of alabaster. Gloria started to work with alabaster from an early age. Her works have a feminine style and distinguish themselves with elaborate floral motifs and carved embroideries. The considerable experience that Gloria has gained over many years permits her to realise increasingly complex objects. Her works also draw from the professional knowledge of two master artisans in Volterra, turner Cerone Homer and ornament worker Gazzanelli Renzo. Gloria has been awarded a number of prizes throughout her career such as the Gremigni Award. She has participated in numerous exhibitions both in Italy and internationally.

Italy  Bowl two bands with mosaic border Stone vessel This alabaster bowl was made on a lathe. The bowl was made from several pieces of different colour alabaster glued together and turned.
Gloria Giannelli
Stone sculptor
Bowl with several alabaster varieties Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

The works are hand shaped on a lathe. An alabaster block is placed on a lathe that rotates the stone at controlled speeds. The surface of the alabaster is then slowly chiselled off using the power of the rotation against the chisel.

Maison

Contact

Gloria Giannelli

Via Don Giovanni Minzoni, 13, 56048 Volterra
+39 0588 84030

Contact

Gloria Giannelli

Via Don Giovanni Minzoni, 13, 56048 Volterra
+39 0588 84030

Métier

The works are hand shaped on a lathe. An alabaster block is placed on a lathe that rotates the stone at controlled speeds. The surface of the alabaster is then slowly chiselled off using the power of the rotation against the chisel.

Biography

Gloria Giannelli

Gloria Giannelli lives and works with alabaster in Volterra, Italy. Her works enhance the qualities of the materials she works with and demonstrate the transparency of alabaster. Gloria started to work with alabaster from an early age. Her works have a feminine style and distinguish themselves with elaborate floral motifs and carved embroideries. The considerable experience that Gloria has gained over many years permits her to realise increasingly complex objects. Her works also draw from the professional knowledge of two master artisans in Volterra, turner Cerone Homer and ornament worker Gazzanelli Renzo. Gloria has been awarded a number of prizes throughout her career such as the Gremigni Award. She has participated in numerous exhibitions both in Italy and internationally.

Italy  Ciotola tre fasce con bordo a mosaico (Bowl three bands with mosaic border) Stone vessel This alabaster bowl was made on a lathe. The bowl is made from several multicoloured pieces of alabaster that have been glued together. The translucent bowl has been highly polished.
Gloria Giannelli
Stone sculptor
Bowl made from several varieties of alabaster Métier Atelier
Story

Atelier

Métier

The works are hand shaped on a lathe. An alabaster block is placed on a lathe that rotates the stone at controlled speeds. The surface of the alabaster is then slowly chiselled off using the power of the rotation against the chisel.

Maison

Contact

Gloria Giannelli

Via Don Giovanni Minzoni, 13, 56048 Volterra
+39 0588 84030

Contact

Gloria Giannelli

Via Don Giovanni Minzoni, 13, 56048 Volterra
+39 0588 84030

Métier

The works are hand shaped on a lathe. An alabaster block is placed on a lathe that rotates the stone at controlled speeds. The surface of the alabaster is then slowly chiselled off using the power of the rotation against the chisel.

Biography

Gloria Giannelli

Gloria Giannelli lives and works with alabaster in Volterra, Italy. Her works enhance the qualities of the materials she works with and demonstrate the transparency of alabaster. Gloria started to work with alabaster from an early age. Her works have a feminine style and distinguish themselves with elaborate floral motifs and carved embroideries. The considerable experience that Gloria has gained over many years permits her to realise increasingly complex objects. Her works also draw from the professional knowledge of two master artisans in Volterra, turner Cerone Homer and ornament worker Gazzanelli Renzo. Gloria has been awarded a number of prizes throughout her career such as the Gremigni Award. She has participated in numerous exhibitions both in Italy and internationally.

France  Mosaïque Feather work The geometric forms of this translucent framed feather design generate a number of symmetrical patterns such as triangles and diamonds, evocative of classical mosaics. The meticulously cut feathers create a flower-petal type pattern. Janaïna proposes an experimental, technical approach inspired by textile handcrafts such as lace, weaving and embroidery.
Janaïna Milheiro
Feather-worker
Articulated web of cut feathers. Story Atelier
Story

Janaïna Milheiro is a feather worker and designer who assembles her feather creations primarily using techniques inherent to the textile industry such as weaving, embroidery and mesh. She stumbled upon this material quite by chance and found that she was attracted to it as a counter option to traditional textiles that share numerous similarities as well as differences with feathers. Feathers are soft and translucent and can be transformed into soft surfaces. Janaïna creates both designs for clothes and pieces that can be used as decoration.

Atelier

Métier

Maison

Contact

Janaïna Milheiro

20, rue Primo Levi 75013 Paris
+33 1 45 84 87 14
www.janaina-milheiro.com

Contact

Janaïna Milheiro

20, rue Primo Levi 75013 Paris
+33 1 45 84 87 14
www.janaina-milheiro.com

Métier

Biography

Janaïna Milheiro

From her Parisian workshop, feather worker Janaïna Milheiro creates textiles, sculptures and other pieces made from feathers. She develops and invents new skills and techniques in order to provide a very personal, innovative vision of feather work for the luxury, fashion and home decoration industries. This experimental and technical approach to feather work gives life to extremely visual pieces with sometimes very surprising purposes. Trained in several handcrafted textile techniques, Janaïna creates unlikely lacework made of feathers, silks woven with feathers, feather flocking as well as three dimensional grids or sculptures in feathers. She is both an artisan and designer. Since 2011, she has been working with passionate clients such as collectors, interior designers and highly demanding fashion houses or luxury brands. Born in 1985 in Brazil, Janaïna graduated from the ENSCI and Ecole Duperré in Paris.

United Kingdom  TABLE (selection) Metal vessel These vessels represent a selection of objects from Juliette Bigley's installation TABLE. Drawing on the traditions of still life and silversmith work, these vases represent an interpretation of a table at the end of a meal. The objects are made from mixed metals. Their matte finish, clean lines and minimalist forms are characteristic of Juliette’s works.
Juliette Bigley
Metal-work
Installation of metal vases Métier Story Atelier
Story

Juliette uses the vessel form as a canvas on which to explore how we experience our emotional and physical place in the world and how we negotiate the interface between the physical world that surrounds us and the intangible worlds of emotion, belief, thought, language and memory. Focusing particularly on lines and thresholds, her vessels explore notions of function rather than function itself.

Atelier

Métier

Juliette Bigley’s works start from flat sheets of metal. These are hand shaped using traditional techniques. Seams are integral to her work and are made using silver solder. Juliette’s work is hand finished with a matte patina using either heat or chemical treatments.

Maison

Contact

Juliette Bigley

London (Walthamstow)
+44 7779 005 751
www.juliettebigley.com

Contact

Juliette Bigley

London (Walthamstow)
+44 7779 005 751
www.juliettebigley.com

Métier

Juliette Bigley’s works start from flat sheets of metal. These are hand shaped using traditional techniques. Seams are integral to her work and are made using silver solder. Juliette’s work is hand finished with a matte patina using either heat or chemical treatments.

Biography

Juliette Bigley

Juliette Bigley is a master metalworker who works with base and precious metals. Juliette creates sculptures that are both familiar and abstract, re-interpreting recognisable forms of containers to create ambiguous spaces that question how we relate to the physical world around us. Her works place a strong emphasis on lines and thresholds. At the heart of her works are three relationships, those between people, that of the objects with other objects and the relationship between people and objects. Juliette initially pursued classical singing and then healthcare management. She chanced upon what would become her love for metal during evening classes. Juliette then studied Architecture and Design at the Cass School of Art, training as a silversmith and obtaining both a BA and a research MA.

Denmark  Blind Box For No Thing Glass Sculpture These three handmade boxes built in sand cast pâte-de-verre seem to have been shaped by a 3D printer. The shapes are evocative of desert rocks or a rocky sea surface, eroded by time.
Karen Lise Krabbe
Glass fusing
Fused glass sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Karen Lise Krabbe carries out a sort of unorganised material research within the silica group, a group with properties strongly related to those of glass. Her work revolves around the creation of composite materials, whereby two materials merge together to create a third new material with different properties and expressions. She builds layer upon layer with two materials using sand as a freely shaped mould to place and contain each layer before it is fired. She explores these composite materials, some of which are ancient and have been used before, others of her own creation. She exposes them to traditional glass and ceramic making techniques, and other techniques that the material spontaneously leads her towards, with often unexpected results.

Atelier

Métier

Karen Lise Krabbe starts to build her works using powdered glass, silicates as well as bio-materials and small elements. She builds layer upon layer, initially creating a two-dimensional surface, before each added and melted layer gradually shapes the piece into a three-dimensional sculpture much like a 3D print.

Maison

Contact

Karen Lise Krabbe

Gammel Munkegade 4 • 8000 Aarhus C
+45 50 45 98 70
karenlise@karenlisekrabbe.dk
karenlisekrabbe.dk

Contact

Karen Lise Krabbe

Gammel Munkegade 4 • 8000 Aarhus C
+45 50 45 98 70
karenlise@karenlisekrabbe.dk
karenlisekrabbe.dk

Métier

Karen Lise Krabbe starts to build her works using powdered glass, silicates as well as bio-materials and small elements. She builds layer upon layer, initially creating a two-dimensional surface, before each added and melted layer gradually shapes the piece into a three-dimensional sculpture much like a 3D print.

Biography

Karen Lise Krabbe

Karen Lise Krabbe began her glassmaking career in the early 1990s. Her works focus on the use of composite materials where two or more materials melt together and form a new one with other properties and expressions. The baseline in all of her works is characterised by intensive material research. She principally uses glass, silicates and bio-materials. Her works explore composite materials’ aesthetics and physical potentials, exposing them to diverse techniques, partly with the knowledge of traditional techniques of glass and ceramic craftsmanship in mind and partly techniques that the new materials themselves intentionally or spontaneously lead her to. Her handmade 3D-print exhibited at Homo Faber is characteristic of this. Karen runs her own workshop in Aarhus, Denmark and is often presented at international and national exhibitions.

Denmark  SEED Glass Sculpture This handmade object built from sand cast pâte-de-verre seems to have been shaped by a 3D printer. The jagged layered shape is evocative of a large seashell.
Karen Lise Krabbe
Glass fusing
Fused glass sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

Karen Lise Krabbe carries out a sort of unorganised material research within the silica group, a group with properties strongly related to those of glass. Her work revolves around the creation of composite materials, whereby two materials merge together to create a third new material with different properties and expressions. She builds layer upon layer with two materials using sand as a freely shaped mould to place and contain each layer before it is fired. She explores these composite materials, some of which are ancient and have been used before, others of her own creation. She exposes them to traditional glass and ceramic making processes, and other techniques that this material spontaneously leads her towards, with often-unexpected results.

Atelier

Métier

Karen Lise Krabbe starts to build her works using powdered glass, silicates as well as bio-materials and small elements. She builds layer upon layer, initially creating a two-dimensional surface, before each added and melted layer gradually shapes the piece into a three-dimensional sculpture much like a 3D print.

Maison

Contact

Karen Lise Krabbe

Gammel Munkegade 4 • 8000 Aarhus C
+45 50 45 98 70
karenlise@karenlisekrabbe.dk
karenlisekrabbe.dk

Contact

Karen Lise Krabbe

Gammel Munkegade 4 • 8000 Aarhus C
+45 50 45 98 70
karenlise@karenlisekrabbe.dk
karenlisekrabbe.dk

Métier

Karen Lise Krabbe starts to build her works using powdered glass, silicates as well as bio-materials and small elements. She builds layer upon layer, initially creating a two-dimensional surface, before each added and melted layer gradually shapes the piece into a three-dimensional sculpture much like a 3D print.

Biography

Karen Lise Krabbe

Karen Lise Krabbe began her glassmaking career in the early 1990s. Her works focus on the use of composite materials where two or more materials melt together and form a new one with other properties and expressions. The baseline in all of her works is characterised by intensive material research. She principally uses glass, silicates and bio-materials. Her works explore composite materials’ aesthetics and physical potentials, exposing them to diverse techniques, partly with the knowledge of traditional techniques of glass and ceramic craftsmanship in mind and partly techniques that the new materials themselves intentionally or spontaneously lead her to. Her handmade 3D-print exhibited at Homo Faber is characteristic of this. Karen runs her own workshop in Aarhus, Denmark and is often presented at international and national exhibitions.

Italy  Eterno Cantiere #2 Glass Sculpture A structure made of iron rods contains a masterfully modelled hand-blown glass vase. The green vase seems to look for an escape route, its fragile sinuous curves stopped by the rigid metal interspaces.
Lorenzo Passi
Glass Blower
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Lorenzo Passi's work investigates the multiple dimensions of memory, creating sculptures that reflect upon the past and on the inevitable loss of the data upon which memory is built.

Atelier

Iron rods used to make reinforced concrete are cut and shaped. Lorenzo prepares the glass and hand-blows glass directly into the metal structure.

Métier

Iron rods usually used to make reinforced concrete are cut and shaped. Lorenzo prepares the glass and hand-blows glass directly into the metal structure.

Maison

Contact

Lorenzo Passi

Sestiere S. Marco 3854 30124 Venice
lorenzopassy@gmail.com
lorenzopassi.com

Contact

Lorenzo Passi

Sestiere S. Marco 3854 30124 Venice
lorenzopassy@gmail.com
lorenzopassi.com

Métier

Iron rods usually used to make reinforced concrete are cut and shaped. Lorenzo prepares the glass and hand-blows glass directly into the metal structure.

Biography

Lorenzo Passi

Lorenzo Passi’s enthusiasm for glass began while studying at the Francesco Arcangeli Art institute when he attended a workshop led by glass artist Joan Crous. Aged 20, he moved to Venice and began a glasswork apprenticeship on the island of Murano in the workshop of Archimede Seguso and “Zanetti Veteria Artistica”. He started training in techniques for manufacturing blown and solid-worked glass. In 2009, he moved to Nuutajärvi, Finland, where he continued training in glass works, graduating three years later. While in Finland Lorenzo began experimenting, matching blown glass to other diverse materials such as metals and wood. This technique would become the basis of his poetic creativity. Upon graduating, he returned to Venice to the workshop of Archimede Seguso and Zanetti glassworks. Lorenzo held his first exhibition in 2013 and has since exhibited his works internationally.

Denmark  Corn Dolly Crown Ceramic sculpture The design of this earthenware ceramic crown emulates the structure of wheat. Braided wheat stems make up the crown’s arches, while a bouquet made from wheat ears rests on top of the crown.
Malene Hartmann Rasmussen
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

In pre-Christian Europe, it was believed the spirit of the wheat lived amongst the crop. At harvest time, corn dollies were braided from the last of the crop, to give the spirit a home for the winter. When spring came, the Corn Dolly was ploughed into the first furrow of the new season. Malene Hartmann Rasmussen creates a place beyond reality, a deceitful echo of the real world, that bends the perception of what is real. She wants her work to look like a very skilled child could have made it, clumsy and elaborate at the same time. Initially the viewer may, mistakenly, be drawn to her figures thinking them to be toys; however closer examination reveals their rather darker narrative.

Atelier

Métier

Hand-modelled ceramic sculpture using basic coiling and sculpting techniques. Details are sometimes added using spring moulds. Larger pieces are often made from smaller parts. The ceramics change when fired, as a soft and malleable material is transformed into a hard and static one. Malene’s works try to capture this moment and preserve the idea of softness.

Maison

Contact

Malene Hartmann Rasmussen

London
malene_h_rasmussen@icloud.com
www.malenehartmannrasmussen.com

Contact

Malene Hartmann Rasmussen

London
malene_h_rasmussen@icloud.com
www.malenehartmannrasmussen.com

Métier

Hand-modelled ceramic sculpture using basic coiling and sculpting techniques. Details are sometimes added using spring moulds. Larger pieces are often made from smaller parts. The ceramics change when fired, as a soft and malleable material is transformed into a hard and static one. Malene’s works try to capture this moment and preserve the idea of softness.

Biography

Malene Hartmann Rasmussen

London based ceramicist Malene Hartmann Rasmussen works with mixed media sculpture, making and arranging multiple components into complex narrative displays of visual excess. The dialogue between components and the way one's unconscious can direct the composition interests her. Malene’s detailed surreal ceramic works draw on motifs from the domestic and natural worlds. Her works evoke visions of excess by merging several seemingly incompatible worlds. Memories, daydreams and childhood nostalgia are all called upon by the artist who weaves them together into a fairytale of her own making. Her surreal narrative is an eclectic collection of ideas comprising mythological creatures, popular graphic culture and her own childhood in rural Denmark. Malene’s interest in forests stems from their recurrence in European literature and myths, ancient cults, pagan rituals and as a metaphor for the hidden realms of the unconscious mind.

United Kingdom  Pithváva Praegressus III
courtesy of: Gallery FUMI
Shell sculpture This freestanding sculpture was created from tens of thousands of Dentalium shells sustainably harvested along the Pacific coast of Northwest America. The two distinctive surface areas within Pithváva Praegressus III are created from opposing ends of the shells, with the intention of celebrating the true beauty of the material itself.
Rowan Mersh
Multimedia Sculptor
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Rowan Mersh's experience in experimental textiles is immediately apparent in his wall-mounted, sculptural assemblages. The works raise inevitable questions about value: some of the shells were traditionally used as currency or sacred wealth, and leather components associated with luxury brands imply a premium; but the real worth here is delivered by the artist’s unique and dedicated vision in unlocking the creative power of these strange components.

Atelier

Rowan builds his shell sculptures with a two-part epoxy resin and a hybrid silicone adhesive.

Métier

Using a combination of two-part epoxy resin and a hybrid silicone adhesive, each shell is manually glued together. As layers of the shells build up, the inherent curvature of the shells informs the three dimensional aspect of individual forms. As one form is completed the next is born, so shell by shell the sculptures organically evolve as a collection of self-informed brush strokes.

Maison

Contact

Rowan Mersh

8 Mackintosh Lane, Unit G1B, E9 6AB. London
+44 7949 158 987
info@rowanmersh.com
wwww.rowanmersh.com

Contact

Rowan Mersh

8 Mackintosh Lane, Unit G1B, E9 6AB. London
+44 7949 158 987
info@rowanmersh.com
wwww.rowanmersh.com

Métier

Using a combination of two-part epoxy resin and a hybrid silicone adhesive, each shell is manually glued together. As layers of the shells build up, the inherent curvature of the shells informs the three dimensional aspect of individual forms. As one form is completed the next is born, so shell by shell the sculptures organically evolve as a collection of self-informed brush strokes.

Biography

Rowan Mersh

Rowan Mersh is a multimedia sculptor who explores form through intuitive application of a material’s inherent qualities. His diverse and experimental approach to creation is epitomised by his ability to take very ordinary materials and transform them into the extraordinary. From textile sculpture to kinetic and interactive installation, Mersh’s pieces are inventive and multipurpose, bridging the realms of art, design and fashion. Regularly exhibiting internationally with Gallery FUMI, Mersh’s sculptures have been acquired by major private and public collections the world over, most notably the V&A, Jerwood and The Crafts Council collections. His commissions and special projects include works for the Mercury Music Prize, Fendi and Veuve Clicquot.

Germany  object of oak Wood sculpture This sculpture has been turned from green (wet) oak. The wood grain is deliberately oriented so as to influence the final form of the object during the drying process. Fissures and cracks, produced through the natural deformation of the wood, are held together with wooden butterfly keys. The surface is treated with clay.
Ernst Gamperl
Wood turning
Turned wood sculpture Métier Story Atelier
Story

After years of experimenting with different types of woods, Ernst Gamperl decided to exclusively turn “wet wood”, freshly cut wood that has not been dried. While his early works display highly precise craftsmanship, his later works have gone down an increasingly minimalistic path, bringing out old forms and surfaces that reveal the beauty of the wood. Ernst’s works do not simply start on the lathe, they are the result of more than twenty years of experimentation, toiling and studying wood, its drying properties and this impact on the final sculpture. He knows that this is a mutual dialogue and he cannot force a shape onto the material. This insight is a challenge that drives him further through this medium and work.

Atelier

Métier

A lathe quickly rotates a piece of wood. The form and texture is cut by hand with special turning tools, partly manufactured by the artist himself.

Maison

Contact

Ulrike Spengler

+49 8862 93 28 800
info@ernst-gamperl.de
www.ernst-gamperl.de

Contact

Ulrike Spengler

+49 8862 93 28 800
info@ernst-gamperl.de
www.ernst-gamperl.de

Métier

A lathe quickly rotates a piece of wood. The form and texture is cut by hand with special turning tools, partly manufactured by the artist himself.

Biography

Ernst Gamperl

Originally trained as a cabinetmaker, Munich born Ernst Gamperl stumbled on woodturning by chance. Equipped with a book on woodturning he starting training in this craft as an autodidact, unhampered by convention in his approach to turnery. After a few years, by means of patience, exercise and research, he perfected this technique and established his first workshop in 1990. Although Ernst used to prefer working with precious, exotic woods, he has since come to focus on working with European wood varieties like maple, beech, Italian olive tree and principally oak. After three years, he entered the design school in Hildesheim, Germany, and was awarded the title "Meister"(Master). Ernst exhibits his work extensively throughout Europe and internationally. His objects have earned him numerous prizes and are found in museum and private collections worldwide.

Ireland  Basket on driftwood fork Basket This handmade basket has been made from driftwood and homegrown willow rods. Raw pieces of driftwood have been used to cover the opening of the brown basket.
Joe Hogan
Basket weaving
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Joe Hogan's artistic baskets are usually inspired by materials that he finds during his walks in the woods. The nature of the discovery of these materials means that most of the baskets are unique and that it is usually quite complicated or impossible to make two the same. These baskets with wooden mouths combine the traditional techniques of basket making with contemporary sculpture-like designs.

Atelier

Métier

The baskets are made using willow grown on Joe Hogan’s farm. The willow must first be harvested, sorted and dried and then soaked for about 10 days to make it pliable enough for weaving using traditional basket-weaving techniques. In some shapes such as the driftwood pouch with embedded stone, Joe makes the basket upside down, completing the base of the basket last.

Maison

Contact

Joe Hogan

Loch na Fooey, Finny, Clonbur Galway
+353 9548241
joe@joehoganbaskets.com
www.joehoganbaskets.com

Contact

Joe Hogan

Loch na Fooey, Finny, Clonbur Galway
+353 9548241
joe@joehoganbaskets.com
www.joehoganbaskets.com

Métier

The baskets are made using willow grown on Joe Hogan’s farm. The willow must first be harvested, sorted and dried and then soaked for about 10 days to make it pliable enough for weaving using traditional basket-weaving techniques. In some shapes such as the driftwood pouch with embedded stone, Joe makes the basket upside down, completing the base of the basket last.

Biography

Joe Hogan

Joe Hogan has worked as a basket-maker since 1977 and opened his own workshop at Loch Na Fooey in the west of Ireland in 1978. He was drawn to basket making because it offered the possibility of living in that beautiful area and growing their own willow. For many years Joe concentrated on making functional baskets and improving his skills. He also researched and made most of the indigenous baskets of Ireland, the baskets that were used for fishing and farming. For the past 20 years, Joe has become increasingly interested in making artistic baskets. These are usually inspired by finds of wood. This work is prompted by a desire to develop a deeper connection to nature.

Denmark  Ceramic sculpture A series of juxtaposed fragile and jagged lamellae spiral down and around a central sphere shaped hand-turned porcelain vessel. The organic shapes of Sandra Davolio’s design reveal a profound connection with nature and with the sea in particular. This white porcelain sculpture was inspired by ancient Mediterranean artefacts.
Sandra Davolio
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Sandra Davolio’s work process starts with moulding a classical vase, the form of which is often inspired by artefacts from ancient Mediterranean cultures, especially the mysterious universe of the Etruscans. She then develops it into a new form through a series of fragile and jagged lamellae placed around the hard core. Sandra is motivated by the continuous exploration of new variations of the basic form, the movement and dynamics, the beauty, strength and frailty of the material.

Atelier

Métier

Sandra Davolio begins by kneading the raw material and working the clay on a wheel to create the inner core of the object. When the core is moulded into the desired shape, lamella-like structures are added in a spiral-like manner around the surface and then made thinner with handwork and water. The object is then polished with sandpaper, to achieve a smooth and clear surface. It is then fired at 1280°C.

Maison

Contact

Sandra Davolio

Kigkurren 8D, kld. 2300 København S
+45 21 83 63 30
sandradavolio@comxnet.dk
www.sandradavolio.dk

Contact

Sandra Davolio

Kigkurren 8D, kld. 2300 København S
+45 21 83 63 30
sandradavolio@comxnet.dk
www.sandradavolio.dk

Métier

Sandra Davolio begins by kneading the raw material and working the clay on a wheel to create the inner core of the object. When the core is moulded into the desired shape, lamella-like structures are added in a spiral-like manner around the surface and then made thinner with handwork and water. The object is then polished with sandpaper, to achieve a smooth and clear surface. It is then fired at 1280°C.

Biography

Sandra Davolio

Born and educated in Italy, Sandra Davolio later moved to Copenhagen, Denmark in 1985 where she studied at the Danish School of Design. She then established her studio in Copenhagen. Sandra’s porcelain and stoneware works are easily distinguishable by their light glazes and often monochromatic, matte or obscure colours. Through her work, she engages with various classical ceramic and porcelain making techniques, creating an innovative style that reflects a subtle Scandinavian influence. A recognisable shell or vase-like shape often makes up the founding structures of her works. The delicate exterior porcelain form of her works, covered with numerous juxtaposed porcelain flakes, creates a wavelike effect. The organic shapes of Sandra’s design reveal a profound connection with nature and with the sea in particular.

Denmark  Ceramic sculpture A series of juxtaposed fragile and jagged lamellae spiral down and around a central sphere shaped hand-turned porcelain vessel. The organic shapes of Sandra Davolio’s design reveal a profound connection with nature and with the sea in particular. This white porcelain sculpture was inspired by ancient Mediterranean artefacts.
Sandra Davolio
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Sandra Davolio’s work process starts with moulding a classical vase, the form of which is often inspired by artefacts from ancient Mediterranean cultures, especially the mysterious universe of the Etruscans. She then develops it into new forms through a series of fragile and jagged lamellae placed around the hard core. Sandra is motivated by a continuous exploration of new variations of the basic form, the movement and dynamics, the beauty, strength and frailty of the material. A spontaneous and instinctive feeling, together with a sense of beauty, elegance and balance of volumes, guides her toward the final result.

Atelier

Métier

Sandra Davolio begins by kneading the raw material and working the clay on a wheel to create the inner core of the object. When the core is moulded into the desired shape, lamella-like structures are added in a spiral-like manner around the surface and then made thinner with handwork and water. The object is then polished with sandpaper, to achieve a smooth and clear surface. It is then fired at 1280°C.

Maison

Contact

Sandra Davolio

Kigkurren 8D, kld. 2300 København S
+45 21 83 63 30
sandradavolio@comxnet.dk
www.sandradavolio.dk

Contact

Sandra Davolio

Kigkurren 8D, kld. 2300 København S
+45 21 83 63 30
sandradavolio@comxnet.dk
www.sandradavolio.dk

Métier

Sandra Davolio begins by kneading the raw material and working the clay on a wheel to create the inner core of the object. When the core is moulded into the desired shape, lamella-like structures are added in a spiral-like manner around the surface and then made thinner with handwork and water. The object is then polished with sandpaper, to achieve a smooth and clear surface. It is then fired at 1280°C.

Biography

Sandra Davolio

Born and educated in Italy, Sandra Davolio later moved to Copenhagen, Denmark in 1985 where she studied at the Danish School of Design. She then established her studio in Copenhagen. Sandra’s porcelain and stoneware works are easily distinguishable by their light glazes and often monochromatic, matte or obscure colours. Through her work, she engages with various classical ceramic and porcelain making techniques, creating an innovative style that reflects a subtle Scandinavian influence. A recognisable shell or vase-like shape often makes up the founding structures of her works. The delicate exterior porcelain form of her works, covered with numerous juxtaposed porcelain flakes, creates a wavelike effect. The organic shapes of Sandra’s design reveal a profound connection with nature and with the sea in particular.

Denmark  Ceramic sculpture A series of juxtaposed fragile and jagged lamellae spiral down and around a central cylinder shaped hand-turned porcelain vessel. The organic shapes of Sandra Davolio’s design reveal a profound connection with nature and with the sea in particular. This white porcelain sculpture was inspired by ancient Mediterranean artefacts.
Sandra Davolio
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Sandra Davolio’s work process starts with moulding a classical vase, the form of which is often inspired by artefacts from ancient Mediterranean cultures, especially the mysterious universe of the Etruscans. She then develops it into new forms through a series of fragile and jagged lamellae placed around the hard core. Sandra is motivated by a continuous exploration of new variations of the basic form, the movement and dynamics, the beauty, strength and frailty of the material. A spontaneous and instinctive feeling, together with a sense of beauty, elegance and balance of volumes, guides her toward the final result.

Atelier

Métier

Sandra Davolio begins by kneading the raw material and working the clay on a wheel to create the inner core of the object. When the core is moulded into the desired shape, lamella-like structures are added in a spiral-like manner around the surface and then made thinner with handwork and water. The object is then polished with sandpaper, to achieve a smooth and clear surface. It is then fired at 1280°C.

Maison

Contact

Sandra Davolio

Kigkurren 8D, kld. 2300 København S
+45 21 83 63 30
sandradavolio@comxnet.dk
www.sandradavolio.dk

Contact

Sandra Davolio

Kigkurren 8D, kld. 2300 København S
+45 21 83 63 30
sandradavolio@comxnet.dk
www.sandradavolio.dk

Métier

Sandra Davolio begins by kneading the raw material and working the clay on a wheel to create the inner core of the object. When the core is moulded into the desired shape, lamella-like structures are added in a spiral-like manner around the surface and then made thinner with handwork and water. The object is then polished with sandpaper, to achieve a smooth and clear surface. It is then fired at 1280°C.

Biography

Sandra Davolio

Born and educated in Italy, Sandra Davolio later moved to Copenhagen, Denmark in 1985 where she studied at the Danish School of Design. She then established her studio in Copenhagen. Sandra’s porcelain and stoneware works are easily distinguishable by their light glazes and often monochromatic, matte or obscure colours. Through her work, she engages with various classical ceramic and porcelain making techniques, creating an innovative style that reflects a subtle Scandinavian influence. A recognisable shell or vase-like shape often makes up the founding structures of her works. The delicate exterior porcelain form of her works, covered with numerous juxtaposed porcelain flakes, creates a wavelike effect. The organic shapes of Sandra’s design reveal a profound connection with nature and with the sea in particular.

Greece  Flowing form Ceramic sculpture This ceramic sculpture is handmade from very thin strips of clay that have been flattened out and joined to form a hollow circular shape. A smaller yellow sculpture is placed within a larger white coloured ceramic sculpture.
Theodora Chorafas
Ceramicist
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Theodora Chorafas understands her works as the expression of the variations within her very self. Material and shapes that might previously have been perceived as rigid and cold are converted into fluid and organic forms with colourful and white segments that tie the sculpture together.

Atelier

Métier

The sculpture is made from strips of clay that have been flattened out by hand. These strips are then joined to form a hollow circular shape. The fragile sculpture is made on its side. The stoneware clay is covered with white or coloured terra sigillata and fired at 1150°C. Only once fired can the piece be lifted to stand vertically onto its final position.

Maison

Contact

Theodora Chorafas

Ikia Karapanou 18010 Aegina
+30 2297026535
www.theochorafas.eu

Contact

Theodora Chorafas

Ikia Karapanou 18010 Aegina
+30 2297026535
www.theochorafas.eu

Métier

The sculpture is made from strips of clay that have been flattened out by hand. These strips are then joined to form a hollow circular shape. The fragile sculpture is made on its side. The stoneware clay is covered with white or coloured terra sigillata and fired at 1150°C. Only once fired can the piece be lifted to stand vertically onto its final position.

Biography

Theodora Chorafas

From her early childhood, Theodora Chofaras has led a nomadic lifestyle and considers herself a citizen of the world. She studied ceramics in London at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts between 1977 and 1978 and subsequently in Faenza in the Centro di Addestramento Professionale until 1978. From 1978 to 1984, she studied at the École des Arts Decoratifs in Geneva, Switzerland. Her works vary between objects and installations, performances, function and concept, timeless tradition and deconstruction of forms. Theodora works from the island of Aegina, Greece. She also dedicates herself to transmitting her love for ceramics through the teaching of a next generation of ceramicists. Her work is exhibited internationally and has received numerous awards.

Switzerland  The Long Voyage: An Evolution in Meaning Glass Sculpture Transparent glass bottles of varying shapes and sizes are placed within a boat's welded steel frame. These moulded and free-blown colourless bottles sit on top of sand that covers the boat's floor.
Monica Guggisberg & Philip Baldwin
Glass work
Blown glass vessels in iron boat structure Métier Story Atelier
Story

A boat steeped in history and iconic symbolism from antiquity to modern times. Philip Baldwin and Monica Guggisberg's ship carries amphorae and relics, which in themselves carry the grains of human civilisation in all its complexity through the ages. Homo sapiens is fundamentally a nomadic species, as such The Long Journey is a reflection of today's poignant circumstances surrounding refugees, migrants and displaced people fleeing for their lives. And yet, these people also carry with them the hopes of humanity, and, individually, the hope for a better life with new horizons and dreams.

Atelier

Métier

The boat has been constructed by several people in several different locations. The largest amphorae were mouth-blown in wooden moulds at the Hergiswill Glass factory in Switzerland. The next two largest ones were blown freehand at a studio in Basel, Switzerland by Matteo Gonet, and the smaller vessels and artefacts were free-blown in Paris at Monica and Philip's studio. In addition, the steel-framed boat was constructed by Alain Nicolet at Dany SA, a high-tech metal fabricator in Yverdon, Switzerland.

Maison

Contact

Baldwin & Guggisberg

Hares Green LD8 2EW Norton, Presteigne,
info@baldwinguggisberg.com
baldwinguggisberg.com

Contact

Baldwin & Guggisberg

Hares Green LD8 2EW Norton, Presteigne,
info@baldwinguggisberg.com
baldwinguggisberg.com

Métier

The boat has been constructed by several people in several different locations. The largest amphorae were mouth-blown in wooden moulds at the Hergiswill Glass factory in Switzerland. The next two largest ones were blown freehand at a studio in Basel, Switzerland by Matteo Gonet, and the smaller vessels and artefacts were free-blown in Paris at Monica and Philip's studio. In addition, the steel-framed boat was constructed by Alain Nicolet at Dany SA, a high-tech metal fabricator in Yverdon, Switzerland.

Biography

Monica Guggisberg & Philip Baldwin

Monica Guggisberg and Philip Baldwin have been working together for over 35 years. Their story can be described as nomadic, a notion intrinsic to many of their works. Their journey has brought them to explore glassworks through numerous angles and techniques. Philip was born in New York where he later obtained his BA from the American University, Washington DC, and Monica in Bern, Switzerland. She completed an apprenticeship in lampwork in Zofingen, Switzerland. They met in Sweden in 1979 when attending a glassblowing course at the Orrefors Factory Glass School and would in 1982 open their studio together in Switzerland. They worked together from their studio in Switzerland for 20 years, creating glasswork for exhibitions in Switzerland and abroad, before moving to Paris in 2001. As from 2015, their studio has been based in rural Wales, with the view over the hills.

United Kingdom  Arctic Tern I Glass vessel Outlined white patterns of Artic terns decorate the surface of these handmade glass vessels. The Arctic tern is a bird from the Laridae family. The light blue shade of the vessel evokes the seawater next to which terns choose their habitat.
Amanda Simmons
Glass work
Glass plate Métier Story Atelier
Story

Playing with gravity in the kiln, Amanda Simmons creates kiln formed glass objects. Manipulating mass, heat, colour and time she aims to create complex, elusive works with intense colours and patterns that react to the light they are placed in. Amanda uses opaque glass powders to construct her works because of its varying translucency as the form elongates in the kiln. She finishes the kiln fired pieces using many cold working processes to shape and mark the glass, including sandblasting, hand lapping and diamond point as well as wheel engraving.

Atelier

Métier

Amanda makes kiln-formed glass vessels and wall panels, playing with gravity and glass powders to form intricate 3D patterns and thin glass structures. Her pieces are finished using many cold working processes to shape and mark the glass, including sandblasting, hand lapping, diamond point and wheel cameo engraving.

Maison

Contact

Amanda Simmons

Rosebank, Corsock DG7 3DN Castle Douglas
+44 7777 684546
amanda.simmons@btinternet.com
www.amandasimmons.co.uk

Contact

Amanda Simmons

Rosebank, Corsock DG7 3DN Castle Douglas
+44 7777 684546
amanda.simmons@btinternet.com
www.amandasimmons.co.uk

Métier

Amanda makes kiln-formed glass vessels and wall panels, playing with gravity and glass powders to form intricate 3D patterns and thin glass structures. Her pieces are finished using many cold working processes to shape and mark the glass, including sandblasting, hand lapping, diamond point and wheel cameo engraving.

Biography

Amanda Simmons

Amanda Simmons is a glasswork artisan based in Dumfries and Galloway in Scotland. Following a first career as a clinical perfusionist, Amanda undertook studies in glass and architecture at Central St Martins School of Art in London and set up her studio near Castle Douglas in 2006. Currently, her work is influenced by research whilst on residency at Lyth Arts Centre in Caithness with scientists based at the Environmental Research Institute in Thurso. Investigations included the blanket bogs of the Flow Country and renewable energy turbines in the Pentland Firth. Amanda has taught internationally and has displayed her works in exhibitions including the British Glass Biennale and the Scottish Gallery in Edinburgh. Her works are found in private and public collections including The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, National Museums Scotland and the North Lands.

United Kingdom  Arctic Tern II Glass vessel Outlined white patterns of Artic terns decorate the surface of these handmade glass vessels. The Arctic tern is a bird from the Laridae family. The light blue shade of the vessels evokes the seawater next to which terns choose their habitat.
Amanda Simmons
Glass work
Glass bowl Métier Story Atelier
Story

Playing with gravity in the kiln, Amanda Simmons creates kiln formed glass objects. Manipulating mass, heat, colour and time she aims to create complex, elusive works with intense colours and patterns that react to the light they are placed in. Amanda uses opaque glass powders to construct her works because of its varying translucency as the form elongates in the kiln. She finishes the kiln fired pieces using many cold working processes to shape and mark the glass, including sandblasting, hand lapping and diamond point as well as wheel engraving.

Atelier

Métier

Amanda makes kiln-formed glass vessels and wall panels, playing with gravity and glass powders to form intricate 3D patterns and thin glass structures. Her pieces are finished using many cold working processes to shape and mark the glass, including sandblasting, hand lapping, diamond point and wheel cameo engraving.

Maison

Contact

Amanda Simmons

Rosebank, Corsock DG7 3DN Castle Douglas
+44 7777 684546
amanda.simmons@btinternet.com
www.amandasimmons.co.uk

Contact

Amanda Simmons

Rosebank, Corsock DG7 3DN Castle Douglas
+44 7777 684546
amanda.simmons@btinternet.com
www.amandasimmons.co.uk

Métier

Amanda makes kiln-formed glass vessels and wall panels, playing with gravity and glass powders to form intricate 3D patterns and thin glass structures. Her pieces are finished using many cold working processes to shape and mark the glass, including sandblasting, hand lapping, diamond point and wheel cameo engraving.

Biography

Amanda Simmons

Amanda Simmons is a glasswork artisan based in Dumfries and Galloway in Scotland. Following a first career as a clinical perfusionist, Amanda undertook studies in glass and architecture at Central St Martins School of Art in London and set up her studio near Castle Douglas in 2006. Currently, her work is influenced by research whilst on residency at Lyth Arts Centre in Caithness with scientists based at the Environmental Research Institute in Thurso. Investigations included the blanket bogs of the Flow Country and renewable energy turbines in the Pentland Firth. Amanda has taught internationally and has displayed her works in exhibitions including the British Glass Biennale and the Scottish Gallery in Edinburgh. Her works are found in private and public collections including The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, National Museums Scotland and the North Lands.

Sweden  Hollow Ceramic vessel This large plate made from a mixture of porcelain and stoneware clay has been covered in a green glaze. The shift in the gradient colour of the glaze is evocative of Hanna’s recent exploration of forests and moss. The raw fired clay is visible on the border of the plate and, like tree bark against moss, contrasts with the green glaze.
Hanna Jarlehed Hyving
Ceramicist
Ceramic plate covered in glaze Métier Story Atelier
Story

To a large extent glazes in Hanna Jarlehed Hyving's work place clay in a subservient position. She sees them as her most important mediator of emotions. Imperfections such as fingerprints created during the handmade creation of her works are covered up by the layer of glass and traditional reduction glass.

Atelier

Métier

Hanna Jarlehed Hyving hand-forms a mixture of porcelain and stoneware clay into plates. Hanna then glazes her objects with transparent earthenware and stoneware glazes that she then fires in a combined electrical kiln. Porcelain clay is used for the sake of the white screen, so that the glazes will have as much surface as possible. The stoneware is used for its strength. Hanna usually works with transparent glazes in thick layers and then processes them with reduction burners in a combined electric and gas oven.

Maison

Contact

Ateljéföreningen Chokladfabriken

Paternostergatan 6 414 67 Göteborg
+46 736 525 870
hanna@jarlehed.se
www.jarlehed.se

Contact

Ateljéföreningen Chokladfabriken

Paternostergatan 6 414 67 Göteborg
+46 736 525 870
hanna@jarlehed.se
www.jarlehed.se

Métier

Hanna Jarlehed Hyving hand-forms a mixture of porcelain and stoneware clay into plates. Hanna then glazes her objects with transparent earthenware and stoneware glazes that she then fires in a combined electrical kiln. Porcelain clay is used for the sake of the white screen, so that the glazes will have as much surface as possible. The stoneware is used for its strength. Hanna usually works with transparent glazes in thick layers and then processes them with reduction burners in a combined electric and gas oven.

Biography

Hanna Jarlehed Hyving

Hanna Jarlehed Hyving lives and works in Gothenburg, Sweden, where she trained at the Academy of Design and Crafts and obtained her Masters in 1998. She has since worked as a ceramicist in the studio association Chocolate Factory. Her works revolve around her keen interest in ceramic materials and their various expressions. She was for a long time interested in water and its various forms, and this theme can be found throughout her earlier works. However, she has recently developed an interest in forests and moss-covered trees. Hanna sets great importance by glazes in the final outcome of her works. She has held a number of solo and group exhibitions. Amongst others, her work has been bought by the Danish Art Council, and she has received numerous prizes such as the World Ceramic Exposition in Korea.

Czech Republic  Polypus Glass Sculpture These three, fibrous green-white pieces were created from fusing and re-melting glass textiles and basalt fibres, materials used for protective clothing designed for industry. These fused glass sculptures are part of her “industrial” Sui Generis series.
Zuzana Kubelková
Glass sculpture
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Glass textile is still glass although in the form of microfibre cloth. Zuzana’s “industrial” project is based on that fact. It processes industrially produced fibres and textiles that are transformed into glass or raw basalt by re-melting. The fibres are mainly used in high temperature premises, but Zuzana melts them and tries to get rid of this attribute, which is something of a paradox. Linking those two fibres creates visually interesting objects that are hardly predictable – especially how the fabrics react and what the result is going to be.

Atelier

Métier

These three pieces were created from fusing and re-melting glass-textile and basalt fibres. The bottom of the objects has been fixed with epoxy. The combination of basalt fibres and glass fibre is visible in the tallest of the three objects. The remaining two objects are made only using fibreglass.

Maison

Métier

These three pieces were created from fusing and re-melting glass-textile and basalt fibres. The bottom of the objects has been fixed with epoxy. The combination of basalt fibres and glass fibre is visible in the tallest of the three objects. The remaining two objects are made only using fibreglass.

Biography

Zuzana Kubelková

Zuzana Kubelková trained in glassmaking in Northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. After her studies at the High School of Applied Arts for Glassmaking in Železný Brod, from where she graduated in glass pressing, Zuzana undertook studies in glass at J. E. Purkyně University in Ústí nad Labem. Zuzana’s creations include both design pieces and conceptual work. Zuzana creates dynamic glass, experiments, fuses it with other substances, analyses and examines it, just as a doctor examines a patient – rationally, but with empathy. She thus resists stagnation, looking for new territories, new approaches and connections in glassmaking. Since 2007 she has participated in a number of exhibition projects. She received the first award for her work two years later.

Denmark  Nattesværdet
courtesy of: Vessel Gallery
Glass Sculpture This sculpture of a boat has been made by combining glasswork and metalwork. The hull of the boat has been made of hand-blown glass using the battuto technique. As every hull is unique, every wood keel has to be constructed accordingly from oak sculpted until it is completely perfect and smooth as silk.
Andrew Jason Brown
Glass work
Nanna Backhaus Brown
Glass work
Lasse Kristensen
Cabinetmaker
Mette Bentzen
Cabinetmaker
Sculpture of glass and wood Métier Story Atelier
Story

Cabinet makers Egeværk and glassmakers Backhaus-Brown came together to combine their mastered skills in an innovative collaboration. Together they worked on the sculptural series “Glasskibe”, creating Viking ships in glass and wood. Backhaus-Brown and Egeværk's studios are located on the quayside in Hundested with a full view of the sea and fjords. This view and its history of once passing Viking ships inspired both companies.

Atelier

With more than 30 years’ experience, the Danish glasswork studio Backhaus-Brown creates a range of handmade glass such as tableware and vases. Their glasswork is contemporary and rooted in Scandinavian design. The studio, located in Hundested on the quayside, comprises glass artists Nanna Backhaus Brown and Andrew Jason Brown. This is a cold glasswork finishing technique that uses a wheel to mark the surface of the glass. The grinding makes relief of differing depths and with overlapping irregularity to create a faceted fish scale or hammered metal effect. With more than 30 years’ experience, the Danish glasswork studio Backhaus-Brown creates a range of handmade glass such as tableware and vases. Their glasswork is contemporary and rooted in Scandinavian design. The studio, located in Hundested on the quayside, comprises glass artists Nanna Backhaus Brown and Andrew Jason Brown.

Métier

This piece combines cabinetmaking, glassblowing and glass grinding. The hull of the boat is made from molten glass blown into a bubble with the aid of a blowpipe. The surface of the glass is then worked on using a cold grinding technique called “Battuto”. The hull is then fitted into a keel made of oak. The wood is worked on until it is perfectly smooth.

Maison

With more than 30 years’ experience, the Danish glasswork studio Backhaus-Brown creates a range of handmade glass such as tableware and vases. Their glasswork is contemporary and rooted in Scandinavian design. The studio, located in Hundested on the quayside, comprises glass artists Nanna Backhaus Brown and Andrew Jason Brown.

Contact

Backhaus-Brown

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 4774 8520
mail@backhaus-brown.com
www.backhaus-brown.com

Contact

Backhaus-Brown

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 4774 8520
mail@backhaus-brown.com
www.backhaus-brown.com

Backhaus-Brown

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 4774 8520
mail@backhaus-brown.com
www.backhaus-brown.com

Lasse Kristensen - Egeværk

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 26 18 28 50
lasse@egevaerk.dk
www.egevaerk.dk

Mette Bentzen - Egeværk

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK-3390 Hundested
+45 23 96 62 94
mette@egevaerk.dk
www.egevaerk.dk

Métier

This piece combines cabinetmaking, glassblowing and glass grinding. The hull of the boat is made from molten glass blown into a bubble with the aid of a blowpipe. The surface of the glass is then worked on using a cold grinding technique called “Battuto”. The hull is then fitted into a keel made of oak. The wood is worked on until it is perfectly smooth.

Biography

Andrew Jason Brown

Andrew Jason Brown principally works glass using an old Italian technique called Battuto. This technique was revived by 20th century architect and glass artist Carlo Scarpa. While glasswork is traditionally made using heat, Andrew creates his glasswork by supplementing heat with this “cold” grinding technique. Andrew is fascinated by the history and design of the Viking period and his works strongly reflect this fascination.

Biography

Nanna Backhaus Brown

Nanna Backhaus Brown is a Danish glass artisan with a keen sense of colour. A wide palette of colours, remarkably combined, is used throughout her works. Nanna primarily works using an old Italian technique called Pastorelli. Nanna’s father is an architect and her mother a designer. This has influenced her design greatly, so that it strongly reflects minimalistic Scandinavian design. Nanna’s work combines the neat aesthetic of Scandinavian design with the colourful nature of the Pastorelli technique to produce personal and innovative pieces.

Biography

Lasse Kristensen

Over the years, Lasse Kristensen has been working on producing exclusive quality furniture and has always placed great importance on durability and elegance. Lasse graduated as a cabinetmaker in 2006, passing his final test with the highest recognition, in the form of a silver medal. In the summer of 2006, Lasse was given the opportunity to test his talent as a craftsman when he was appointed to the Danish championships in Møbelsnedkeri - a championship he won. The victory gave access to the Nordic Championship in furniture screwing in Norway, which Lasse also won.

Biography

Mette Bentzen

Mette Bentzen has been working on fine furniture production for a number of years. Before that, she spent three years sailing the ocean in a small sailboat. For Mette, carpentry is more a passion than work. The driving force lies in the joy of processing beautiful, living materials, like wood.

Denmark  Ran
courtesy of: Vessel Gallery
Glass Sculpture This sculpture of a boat with a blue glass hull has been made by combining glasswork and metalwork. The hull of the boat has been made of hand-blown glass using the battuto technique. As every hull is unique, every wood keel has to be constructed accordingly from oak sculpted until it is completely perfect and smooth as silk.
Andrew Jason Brown
Glass work
Nanna Backhaus Brown
Glass work
Lasse Kristensen
Cabinetmaker
Mette Bentzen
Cabinetmaker
Sculpture of glass and wood Métier Story Atelier
Story

Cabinet makers Egeværk and glassmakers Backhaus-Brown came together to combine their mastered skills in an innovative collaboration. Together they worked on the sculptural series “Glasskibe”, creating Viking ships in glass and wood. Backhaus-Brown and Egeværk's studios are located on the quayside in Hundested with a full view of the sea and fjords. This view and its history of once passing Viking ships inspired both companies.

Atelier

With more than 30 years’ experience, the Danish glasswork studio Backhaus-Brown creates a range of handmade glass such as tableware and vases. Their glasswork is contemporary and rooted in Scandinavian design. The studio, located in Hundested on the quayside, comprises glass artists Nanna Backhaus Brown and Andrew Jason Brown. This is a cold glasswork finishing technique that uses a wheel to mark the surface of the glass. The grinding makes relief of differing depths and with overlapping irregularity to create a faceted fish scale or hammered metal effect. With more than 30 years’ experience, the Danish glasswork studio Backhaus-Brown creates a range of handmade glass such as tableware and vases. Their glasswork is contemporary and rooted in Scandinavian design. The studio, located in Hundested on the quayside, comprises glass artists Nanna Backhaus Brown and Andrew Jason Brown.

Métier

This piece combines cabinet making, glassblowing and glass grinding. The hull of the boat is made from molten glass blown into a bubble with the aid of a blowpipe. The surface of the glass is then worked on using a cold grinding technique called “Battuto”. The hull is then fitted into a keel made of oak. The wood is worked on until it is perfectly smooth.

Maison

With more than 30 years’ experience, the Danish glasswork studio Backhaus-Brown creates a range of handmade glass such as tableware and vases. Their glasswork is contemporary and rooted in Scandinavian design. The studio, located in Hundested on the quayside, comprises glass artists Nanna Backhaus Brown and Andrew Jason Brown.

Contact

Backhaus-Brown

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 4774 8520
mail@backhaus-brown.com
www.backhaus-brown.com

Contact

Backhaus-Brown

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 4774 8520
mail@backhaus-brown.com
www.backhaus-brown.com

Backhaus-Brown

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 4774 8520
mail@backhaus-brown.com
www.backhaus-brown.com

Lasse Kristensen - Egeværk

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK - 3390 Hundested
+45 26 18 28 50
lasse@egevaerk.dk
www.egevaerk.dk

Mette Bentzen - Egeværk

Nordre Beddingsvej 26 DK-3390 Hundested
+45 23 96 62 94
mette@egevaerk.dk
www.egevaerk.dk

Métier

This piece combines cabinet making, glassblowing and glass grinding. The hull of the boat is made from molten glass blown into a bubble with the aid of a blowpipe. The surface of the glass is then worked on using a cold grinding technique called “Battuto”. The hull is then fitted into a keel made of oak. The wood is worked on until it is perfectly smooth.

Biography

Andrew Jason Brown

Andrew Jason Brown principally works glass using an old Italian technique called Battuto. This technique was revived by 20th century architect and glass artist Carlo Scarpa. While glasswork is traditionally made using heat, Andrew creates his glasswork by supplementing heat with this “cold” grinding technique. Andrew is fascinated by the history and design of the Viking period and his works strongly reflect this fascination.

Biography

Nanna Backhaus Brown

Nanna Backhaus Brown is a Danish glass artisan with a keen sense of colour. A wide palette of colours, remarkably combined, is used throughout her works. Nanna primarily works using an old Italian technique called Pastorelli. Nanna’s father is an architect and her mother a designer. This has influenced her design greatly, so that it strongly reflects minimalistic Scandinavian design. Nanna’s work combines the neat aesthetic of Scandinavian design with the colourful nature of the Pastorelli technique to produce personal and innovative pieces.

Biography

Lasse Kristensen

Over the years, Lasse Kristensen has been working on producing exclusive quality furniture and has always placed great importance on durability and elegance. Lasse graduated as a cabinetmaker in 2006, passing his final test with the highest recognition, in the form of a silver medal. In the summer of 2006, Lasse was given the opportunity to test his talent as a craftsman when he was appointed to the Danish championships in Møbelsnedkeri - a championship he won. The victory gave access to the Nordic Championship in furniture screwing in Norway, which Lasse also won.

Biography

Mette Bentzen

Mette Bentzen has been working on fine furniture production for a number of years. Before that, she spent three years sailing the ocean in a small sailboat. For Mette, carpentry is more a passion than work. The driving force lies in the joy of processing beautiful, living materials, like wood.

United Kingdom  Clovis in Amber
courtesy of: Vessel Gallery
Glass Sculpture This amber-coloured monolithic sculpture mounted on an aluminium base is the result of James Devereux's experimentation with glass sculpture. The surface of the previously moulded sculpture has been chipped off, as if working stone. The jagged lines of the chipped edge contrast with the rest of the smooth surface of the sculpture.
James Devereux
Glass work
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Monolithic in presence, the Clovis Collection is the result of laboured experiments by James Devereux to literally chip the glass like stone. A blow too hard would simply shatter the piece, while too light a tap could fissure the surface. This technique took many years to perfect and results in smooth, haphazard, juxtaposed lines. The final step in the creation of his sculptures is flame polishing, softening the edges that are not sharp despite their appearance, but smooth to the touch.

Atelier

James Devereux and Katherine Huskie created Devereux and Huskie Glassworks studio in September 2013. The fully equipped studio produces both large and small works.

Métier

Hot sculpting is a technique in which a solid metal rod is used to gather the molten glass from the furnace, before it is shaped with the use of special tools or by hand sculpting. While the process is similar to blown glass, no actual blowing takes place in the sculpture. The hot sculpting process tends to make much larger solid pieces of glass art.

Maison

James Devereux and Katherine Huskie created Devereux and Huskie Glassworks studio in September 2013. The fully equipped studio produces both large and small works.

Contact

Deverux and Huskie Glassworks

Unit 33 Marsh Farm Marsh Road BA14 7PJ Hilperton
+44 7739112713
Info@devereuxandhuskie.co.uk
devereuxandhuskie.com

Contact

Deverux and Huskie Glassworks

Unit 33 Marsh Farm Marsh Road BA14 7PJ Hilperton
+44 7739112713
Info@devereuxandhuskie.co.uk
devereuxandhuskie.com

Métier

Hot sculpting is a technique in which a solid metal rod is used to gather the molten glass from the furnace, before it is shaped with the use of special tools or by hand sculpting. While the process is similar to blown glass, no actual blowing takes place in the sculpture. The hot sculpting process tends to make much larger solid pieces of glass art.

Biography

James Devereux

Glass sculptor James Devereux started to train in glasswork at the age of 15 and discovered a natural talent for this craft. James specialises in working with hot glass, creating solid forms as well as blown pieces. Over the years, he has acquired a vast knowledge of glassworking techniques and is always happy to undertake new challenges. In 2008, James set up and opened his first studio in the Wiltshire countryside. He became a glass technician at the Royal College of Art in London in 2009, a position that he held up to 2013. Upon leaving London in the same year, he opened up a studio with Katherine Huskie in the British countryside. James’s mastery of numerous skills and his high technical level have contributed to the creation of unique and innovative works. His latest collection of Clovis works can be viewed at Vessel Gallery London.

United Kingdom  Clovis in Amethyst
courtesy of: Vessel Gallery
Glass Sculpture This monolithic sculpture mounted on an aluminium base is the result of James Devereux's experimentation with glass sculpture. The surface of the moulded sculpture has been chipped off, as if working stone. The jagged lines of the chipped edge contrast with the rest of the smooth surface of the sculpture.
James Devereux
Glass work
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Monolithic in presence, the Clovis Collection is the result of laboured experiments by James Devereux to literally chip the glass like stone. A blow too hard would simply shatter the piece, while too light a tap could fissure the surface. This technique took many years to perfect and results in smooth, haphazard, juxtaposed lines. The final step in the creation of his sculptures is flame polishing, softening the edges that are not sharp despite their appearance, but smooth to the touch.

Atelier

James Devereux and Katherine Huskie created Devereux and Huskie Glassworks studio in September 2013. The fully equipped studio produces both large and small works.

Métier

Hot sculpting is a technique in which a solid metal rod is used to gather the molten glass from the furnace, before it is shaped with the use of special tools or by hand sculpting. While the process is similar to blown glass, no actual blowing takes place in the sculpture. The hot sculpting process tends to make much larger solid pieces of glass art.

Maison

James Devereux and Katherine Huskie created Devereux and Huskie Glassworks studio in September 2013. The fully equipped studio produces both large and small works.

Contact

Deverux and Huskie Glassworks

Unit 33 Marsh Farm Marsh Road BA14 7PJ Hilperton
+44 7739112713
Info@devereuxandhuskie.co.uk
devereuxandhuskie.com

Contact

Deverux and Huskie Glassworks

Unit 33 Marsh Farm Marsh Road BA14 7PJ Hilperton
+44 7739112713
Info@devereuxandhuskie.co.uk
devereuxandhuskie.com

Métier

Hot sculpting is a technique in which a solid metal rod is used to gather the molten glass from the furnace, before it is shaped with the use of special tools or by hand sculpting. While the process is similar to blown glass, no actual blowing takes place in the sculpture. The hot sculpting process tends to make much larger solid pieces of glass art.

Biography

James Devereux

Glass sculptor James Devereux started to train in glasswork at the age of 15 and discovered a natural talent for this craft. James specialises in working with hot glass, creating solid forms as well as blown pieces. Over the years, he has acquired a vast knowledge of glassworking techniques and is always happy to undertake new challenges. In 2008, James set up and opened his first studio in the Wiltshire countryside. He became a glass technician at the Royal College of Art in London in 2009, a position that he held up to 2013. Upon leaving London in the same year, he opened up a studio with Katherine Huskie in the British countryside. James’s mastery of numerous skills and his high technical level have contributed to the creation of unique and innovative works. His latest collection of Clovis works can be viewed at Vessel Gallery London.

Czech Republic  Sapphire ship
courtesy of: ARTSiO collection
Glass Sculpture This one-metre long sculpture is Jaroslav Prošek’s longest sculpture made to date and reflects his love for the sea and ships. The deep-blue sapphire colour of the sculpture is evocative both of the sea and of the bare hull of a boat.
Jaroslav Prošek
Glass sculpture
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Jaroslav Prošek loves sailing. To use his own words, he could spend his entire life on the sea. His one-metre long sculpture is one of the biggest he has ever made and reflects the spirit of freedom and the joy of life.

Atelier

Métier

Bohemian crystal is heated to 900°C. The melted glass is shaped in a mould. The cooled crystal sculpture is then grinded for hundreds of hours and polished by hand until finished.

Maison

Contact

Jaroslav Prošek

Dolní 4 470 01 Česká Lípa
+420 733 627 422
info@jaroslavprosek.com
www.jaroslavprosek.com

Contact

Jaroslav Prošek

Dolní 4 470 01 Česká Lípa
+420 733 627 422
info@jaroslavprosek.com
www.jaroslavprosek.com

Métier

Bohemian crystal is heated to 900°C. The melted glass is shaped in a mould. The cooled crystal sculpture is then grinded for hundreds of hours and polished by hand until finished.

Biography

Jaroslav Prošek

Born in 1986 in the Czech Republic, Jaroslav Prošek first discovered glasswork after leaving secondary school. He worked and trained at the Marek Landa Art Chandelier Company and subsequently in the workshops of Bohemian crystal masters Mr. Jan Frydrych and Mr. Vlastimil Beranek. Here he discovered his passion for crystal and optical glass sculpture. Jaroslav's sculptures all tell a story and he conveys his passion for the sea, boats and sailing through them. His constant experimentation with the possibilities of materials such as optical glass, crystal glass, stainless steel, marble or wood, and his fine re-conception of form and structure, place him at the forefront of contemporary art and design in the Czech Republic. His works have been exhibited internationally since 2013 and feature in a large number of boat exhibitions such as the Dubai International Boat Show.

Czech Republic  Shell, aqua, satin
courtesy of: ARTSiO collection
Glass Sculpture This monumental handmade blue coloured mould melted Bohemian crystal sculpture is mounted on a stainless-steel plinth. The sculpture evokes the image of the sea as much in its aquamarine blue colour as in its wave-like form. Although static, the sculpture seems to be constantly moving.
Vlastimil Beránek
Glass work
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Vlastimil Beránek’s works express movement in a few clean curves. That Vlastimil draws his inspiration from the unknown magic of deep oceans is evidenced by his career’s work. In a paradoxical manner, he also draws his inspiration from fire. Vlastimil is deeply concerned about how humans destroy the environment. His dedication to pure perfect form results in immaculately shaped objects perfected with the utmost attention to detail and precision.

Atelier

Métier

Each sculpture is unique, having been “freely” shaped without the use of a mould. To sculpt Bohemian crystal is complicated because the material is very brittle and chips easily. Additionally, during melting and grinding, unexpected cracks can develop.

Maison

Contact

Vlastimil Beránek

Stržanov 43 59 102 Ždár nad Sázavou
+420 733 627 422
mareklanda@gmail.com
www.vlastimilberanek.com

Contact

Vlastimil Beránek

Stržanov 43 59 102 Ždár nad Sázavou
+420 733 627 422
mareklanda@gmail.com
www.vlastimilberanek.com

Métier

Each sculpture is unique, having been “freely” shaped without the use of a mould. To sculpt Bohemian crystal is complicated because the material is very brittle and chips easily. Additionally, during melting and grinding, unexpected cracks can develop.

Biography

Vlastimil Beránek

Vlastimil Beránek is the third generation of the well-established, glassmaking Beránek family which founded a glasshouse in Škrdlovice in the Czech Republic in the 1940s. He managed the family glassworks from 1992 to 2008. Vlastimil studied at the Academy of Applied Arts in Prague. He is particularly interested in the creation of molten glass sculpture and capturing movement in the simplest way, expressing pure energy in solid material. His forms are rigid and minimalistic in design, often skirting the technical limits of technological possibilities. His monumental sculptures claim their own space and are not limited to the confines of the pedestal. They embrace and integrate different dimensions of the space in which they are placed. They are inspired by the depth as well as the mystery of oceans and also by fire.

Norway  Meduse IV Fabric sculpture This brown-coloured textile sculpture resembles a sea anemone or coral and has been made using an old embroidery technique called smocking. The surface of the sculpture is indented throughout, creating an optical illusion of movement.
Ingrid Larssen
Fabric sculptor
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Inspiration for the works is collected from Ingrid Larssen’s own experience of nature in her native Vesterålen in the north of Norway. In particular, life beneath the sea has given her ideas for shapes, colours and substances. Some shapes remind us of jellyfish with long tentacles, others are shaped like sea anemones or sea cucumbers resting at the bottom of the ocean. Her decorations created for the “Room for everyone” in the new Nordland Hospital Vesterålen in 2014 and for “Travel kb176" for Melbu School in 2016 were made from wool and sea urchins. Ingrid Larssen’s textile works seduce on an immediate level. But beneath the beautiful surface one finds references to stories of art as well as stories of the sea.

Atelier

Métier

Smocking usually involves reducing fabric to one third of its original width by stitching the fabric together. This begins by marking dots in a grid pattern on the wrong side of the fabric. This is gathered together by temporary running stitches. A row of cable stitches is added to steady this area. Numerous patterns can be applied to stitches individually or combined.

Maison

Contact

Ingrid Larssen

Hadsel N-8450 Stokmarknes
ingridlarssen62@gmail.com
www.ingridlarssen.no

Contact

Ingrid Larssen

Hadsel N-8450 Stokmarknes
ingridlarssen62@gmail.com
www.ingridlarssen.no

Métier

Smocking usually involves reducing fabric to one third of its original width by stitching the fabric together. This begins by marking dots in a grid pattern on the wrong side of the fabric. This is gathered together by temporary running stitches. A row of cable stitches is added to steady this area. Numerous patterns can be applied to stitches individually or combined.

Biography

Ingrid Larssen

Ingrid Larssen undertook training as a jeweller at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam and the Statens Håndverks- og kunstindustriskole in Oslo where she graduated in 1986. In 1987, Ingrid started creating jewellery and objects using a large variety of techniques and materials. For the past 18 years Ingrid has dedicated herself to textiles, experimenting with an old embroidery technique called smocking (waffle stitching). She uses this technique to create large collar necklaces made of silk and freshwater pearls. Her works are not intended to be worn, however. Throughout her art career, she has been committed to tradition and innovation and has worked as an art consultant, curator and project manager. She has received Norway's guaranteed income for artists since 2011.

Norway  Actiniae II Fabric sculpture This shimmering, almost iridescent, blue-violet textile sculpture resembles coral or a seashell. It was made using an old embroidery technique called smocking. The technique creates an indented surface which accentuates the contrasting colours through a play of light and dark.
Ingrid Larssen
Fabric sculptor
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Inspiration for the works is collected from Ingrid Larssen’s own experience of nature in her native Vesterålen in the north of Norway. In particular, life beneath the sea has given her ideas for shapes, colours, and substances. Some shapes remind us of jellyfish with long tentacles, others are shaped like sea anemones or sea cucumbers resting at the bottom of the ocean. Her decorations created for the “Room for everyone” in the new Nordland Hospital Vesterålen in 2014 and for “Travel kb176" for Melbu School in 2016 were made from wool and sea urchins. Ingrid Larssen’s textile works seduce on an immediate level. But beneath the beautiful surface one finds references to stories of art as well as stories of the sea.

Atelier

Métier

Smocking usually involves reducing fabric to one third of its original width by stitching the fabric together. This begins by marking dots in a grid pattern on the wrong side of the fabric. This is gathered together by temporary running stitches. A row of cable stitches is added to steady this area. Numerous patterns can be applied to stitches individually or combined.

Maison

Contact

Ingrid Larssen

Hadsel N-8450 Stokmarknes
ingridlarssen62@gmail.com
www.ingridlarssen.no

Contact

Ingrid Larssen

Hadsel N-8450 Stokmarknes
ingridlarssen62@gmail.com
www.ingridlarssen.no

Métier

Smocking usually involves reducing fabric to one third of its original width by stitching the fabric together. This begins by marking dots in a grid pattern on the wrong side of the fabric. This is gathered together by temporary running stitches. A row of cable stitches is added to steady this area. Numerous patterns can be applied to stitches individually or combined.

Biography

Ingrid Larssen

Ingrid Larssen undertook training as a jeweller at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam and the Statens Håndverks- og kunstindustriskole in Oslo where she graduated in 1986. In 1987, Ingrid started creating jewellery and objects using a large variety of techniques and materials. For the past 18 years Ingrid has dedicated herself to textiles, experimenting with an old embroidery technique called smocking (waffle stitching). She uses this technique to create large collar necklaces made of silk and freshwater pearls. Her works are not intended to be worn, however. Throughout her art career, she has been committed to tradition and innovation and has worked as an art consultant, curator and project manager. She has received Norway's guaranteed income for artists since 2011.

Ireland  Golden Glass vessel A blown-glass, topaz-coloured, hollow form with an undulated wheel-cut rim, balanced on a glass ring. The object conjures the image of a landscape made of transparent light. It evokes the time between night and dawn, when, through the veil of what can be seen, we glimpse another world.
Róisín de Buitléar
Glass sculpture
Story Atelier
Story

Róisín de Buitléar is fascinated by glass as much for its beauty as the challenge of working with it. She is continually inspired by the endless creative possibilities that this medium has to offer. At the core of her work are stories of her culture, retold through alchemy. Glass objects that communicate ideas in different contexts.

Atelier

Métier

Maison

Contact

Róisín de Buitléar

+353 87 7751938
rdebuitlear@yahoo.com
www.rdebuitlear.com

Contact

Róisín de Buitléar

+353 87 7751938
rdebuitlear@yahoo.com
www.rdebuitlear.com

Métier

Biography

Róisín de Buitléar

Róisín de Buitléar is an artist, educator, curator and writer. She has worked with glass since 1982, drawing inspiration from her cultural heritage. She has site-specific installations in public buildings throughout Ireland. Her artworks are represented in public collections in Ireland, Britain, Japan, France, China and the US. Her recent work focuses on sound objects for exhibition and performance. CAUTION! Fragile Tradition in Transition, a seminal exhibition focusing on traditions of cutting and engraving glass in Ireland, is currently on view at the National Museum of Ireland, where she is the inaugural artist-in-residence for 2018. She is currently engaged in designing a national sound garden for Dublin City Council, and signature sculptures for the National Children’s Hospital Dublin.

Ireland  Skeletal Trace Glass vessel A blown-glass hollow form engraved with a wheel rim diamond point conjuring the image of a Viking ship navigating fjords. The piece evokes the cultural connection between Ireland and Scandinavia.
Róisín de Buitléar
Glass sculpture
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Connections between Ireland and Scandinavia are deeply rooted in our culture. Determination, ambition and design brought these invaders to our land. Therein lies a strange history of gifts as well as stolen treasure. These histories have played a strong role in the conceptualisation of Roisin de Buitlear’s works.

Atelier

Métier

Glassblowing, engraving, cutting

Maison

Contact

Róisín de Buitléar

+353 87 7751938
rdebuitlear@yahoo.com
www.rdebuitlear.com

Contact

Róisín de Buitléar

+353 87 7751938
rdebuitlear@yahoo.com
www.rdebuitlear.com

Métier

Glassblowing, engraving, cutting

Biography

Róisín de Buitléar

Róisín de Buitléar is an artist, educator, curator and writer. She has worked with glass since 1982, drawing inspiration from her cultural heritage. She has site-specific installations in public buildings throughout Ireland. Her artworks are represented in public collections in Ireland, Britain, Japan, France, China and the US. Her recent work focuses on sound objects for exhibition and performance. CAUTION! Fragile Tradition in Transition, a seminal exhibition focusing on traditions of cutting and engraving glass in Ireland, is currently on view at the National Museum of Ireland, where she is the inaugural artist-in-residence for 2018. She is currently engaged in designing a national sound garden for Dublin City Council, and signature sculptures for the National Children’s Hospital Dublin.

Ireland  Ballinskelligs Glass vessel The intense colour of the setting sun at the edge of the Atlantic on Ireland’s coast inspired this piece. Dimming evening light stretching out over an ancient landscape to worlds beyond. The surface of this deep orange, hollow, blown-glass bowl has been wheel-cut and engraved with a diamond point.
Róisín de Buitléar
Glass sculpture
Métier Story Atelier
Story

Connections between Ireland and Scandinavia are deeply rooted in our culture. Determination, ambition and design brought these invaders to our land. Therein lies a strange history of gifts as well as stolen treasure. These histories have played a strong role in the conceptualisation of Roisin de Buitlear’s works.

Atelier

Métier

Glassblowing, engraving, cutting

Maison

Contact

Róisín de Buitléar

+353 87 7751938
rdebuitlear@yahoo.com
www.rdebuitlear.com

Contact

Róisín de Buitléar

+353 87 7751938
rdebuitlear@yahoo.com
www.rdebuitlear.com

Métier

Glassblowing, engraving, cutting

Biography

Róisín de Buitléar

Róisín de Buitléar is an artist, educator, curator and writer. She has worked with glass since 1982, drawing inspiration from her cultural heritage. She has site-specific installations in public buildings throughout Ireland. Her artworks are represented in public collections in Ireland, Britain, Japan, France, China and the US. Her recent work focuses on sound objects for exhibition and performance. CAUTION! Fragile Tradition in Transition, a seminal exhibition focusing on traditions of cutting and engraving glass in Ireland, is currently on view at the Nation